American Confederate Navy

Waterways
9th February 2007, 22:57
The Confederate navy's unofficial home port was Liverpool - in England.
The most successful man-o-war in history was the CCS Alabama, sinking more vessels than any other.
Alabama had predominantly American officers (not all, some British) and a predominantly Liverpool crew.
Alabama was built at Lairds at Birkenhead, was American owned, fought an American war, had a mainly British crew and not once berthed in an American port.

The first shots of the US civil war were fired by guns made in Lydia Ann St, Liverpool and the last official lowering of the Confederate flag was in the River Mersey between Tranmere and Toxteth. The last act of the war was when Captain Warddell walked up the steps of Liverpool Town Hall surrendering his vessel.

CSS Alabama was sunk off Cherbourg in France by guns made in Lydia Ann St, Liverpool.

http://www.csa-dixie.com/liverpool_dixie/index.htm

OLD STRAWBERRY
10th February 2007, 10:52
You were talking about the first shots fired in the American Civil War. That would have been on Fort Sumter at Charleston?.

Waterways
10th February 2007, 11:17
You were talking about the first shots fired in the American Civil War. That would have been on Fort Sumter at Charleston?.

There is always a debate by US Civil War buffs about the first shots. It is generally accepted a cannon made by Fawcett Preston in Liverpool fired the first shot that meant the war was fully under way.

North and South both used Fawcett Preston canons and steam engines. Lairds shipyard was making ships for the north and south at the same time. Other yards made men-o-war for the south too. However the city of Liverpool was overwhelmingly pro Confederate, with the Stars and Bars flying on many buildings. This disturbed the North who set up an intricate spy ring to detect ships and arms destined for the South, who would then protest to Westminster.

The city ignored London's rulings that no one should supply arms to an enemy of a friend, supplying ships, their crews and arms to the south. Lairds building the iron twin turreted rams prompted Lincoln to threaten war on the UK if they were delivered (they would have wiped most of the Norths fleet away) - the RN reluctantly took them into the navy - they made every warship instantly obsolete, yet the RN didn't want them because they never designed them.

Bill Lambert
15th February 2007, 06:03
Well, I once shook the hand of the granddaughter of Raphael Semmes.

p44
15th October 2007, 15:58
I'm an enthusiast of the American Civil War and I highly recommend this book, it tells the complete story of the CS Navy:

http://www.amazon.com/History-Confederate-Navy-Raimondo-Luraghi/dp/1557505276/ref=sr_1_1/002-4747349-3917663?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1192456531&sr=1-1

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41M3HZAJF2L._BO2,204,203,200_PIlitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_.jpg

History of the Confederate Navy is probably the only important book on the U.S. Civil War that was first written in Italian and then translated into English. Nonetheless, historian Raimondo Luraghi offers the fullest account to date of the South's naval activity. He challenges the popular notion that the Confederate navy was a failure because it did not break the North's blockade. Busting the blockade was not its main goal, Luraghi argues. Instead, the Confederate navy primarily wanted to prevent an amphibious invasion of the South--a mission in which it mostly succeeded. This particular interpretation is disputable, but the facts and figures of Luraghi's history are not. He shows how an agrarian people built a navy that managed to continue fighting several months after Lee's surrender at Appomattox, and on the whole made a good showing on the seas against an industrial superpower.

Chouan
15th October 2007, 21:12
"they made every warship instantly obsolete, yet the RN didn't want them because they never designed them."

The RN didn't want them because they had no purpose for them, more like. They weren't particularly good seaboats, as far as I'm aware, either.