Did Listening to Morse Code make You Deaf?

tedc
9th March 2007, 18:19
It's not uncommon for the Medical Profession to suggest that regular listening to loud sounds (i.e. Music) can have a detrimental effect on ones hearing.

Those huge headphones focussing all those dots and dashes straight into our eardrums- they'd never get away with it today!

I wonder how many Radio Officers and telegraphists now have hearing impediment when compared to other occupations. Was your hearing affected?

It seems to me that you always have to say things twice to old R/Os.

Furthermore, could there be a case for a massive claim for compensation?

The first one who replies "pardon" will be keel-hauled at 8 bells....!

(and maybe all those "bells" were damaging as well.......?)

treeve
9th March 2007, 19:04
And what about repetitive strain injury on that wrist and finger?
And all that running around with messages on clipboards,
hopping over all manner of obstacles, not very HSE.
I suppose nowadays all manner of risk assessments have
to be filled out before even going onboard a ship.

notnila
9th March 2007, 23:45
The reason everything had to be repeated,was to give Sparks time to translate what had been said into Morse,which he understood!

Moulder
10th March 2007, 00:00
Furthermore, could there be a case for a massive claim for compensation?


There could very well be if it is made within 3 years of working in the environment that caused the damaged hearing.

All the best,

Steve.
(Thumb)

K urgess
10th March 2007, 00:09
It's like going bald, becoming overweight, having to wear glasses and getting old. We don't admit to any of it so I'm not deaf.(EEK)

Seriously, I think more damage was done to my hearing working in factories and engineering works than listening to morse. Most receivers had AGC (automatic gain control) which worked very well. I never had the volume up very loud and could pick out faint signals in the background quite easily. Like listening to a conversation on the other side of a crowded room. Worst bits were those Pacific thunderstorms that looked lovely but gave you a headache on 500.

Biggest danger from all that listening was the distinct possibility that you could go mad. Most of us sparkies were slightly mad anyway. I relieved one guy once who regularly held conversations with the lifeboats according to those who had sailed with him.

Currently damage is probably being done to my hearing by the sudden increase in volume when the adverts come on in the middle of a program on TV. A very annoying habit all the TV stations have go into. (Cloud)

I just found a TV that has AGC, magic.(Thumb)

Cheers
Kris

benjidog
10th March 2007, 00:24
Kris,

I agree with you about that - it is very annoying indeed.

I have got into the habit of pressing the MUTE button on the remote as soon as the adverts come on. Works a treat and the stupid adverts look even more stupid without the sound (if that were possible). Ideally I would like a telly that switched the sound off automatically when the adverts start.

Brian

treeve
10th March 2007, 00:34
I have got into the habit of recording all tv when it is on commercial stations; that way I can fast forward through the ever increasing time that is wasted in throwing second rate moronic adverts at me; and it save 17 minutes an hour of my time every hour. Most adverts are an insult against intelligence and humanity. Anyway, (as Dom says ) what was the question?

tunatownshipwreck
10th March 2007, 05:29
Not deaf from Morse Code here, but a bit dotty.



Sorry.
Time to dash off.

Moulder
10th March 2007, 15:52
The Singapore Straits were famous for crashing QRN which didn't help the ol' lug'oles.

I had an audiometric test in 1983 (after 14 years at sea) and they could actually tell that I had regulary listened to static and were also on the button when the consultant suggested I had been shooting firearms without ear defenders.

Steve.
(Thumb)

marinero
11th March 2007, 16:43
I don't know about morse code making you deaf but I heard reading Port Said Bibles certainly was a cause of deafness.
Regards(Thumb)

tunatownshipwreck
11th March 2007, 20:30
I don't know about morse code making you deaf but I heard reading Port Said Bibles certainly was a cause of deafness.
Regards(Thumb)

I'm wondering if those are what was once known here as a "Tijuana Bible", eight page cartoon books of a sexual adventure, mostly made in the 1920-1930s?

Robinj
11th March 2007, 23:28
Luckily I didn't go deaf and I agree entirely about the adverts. Must be another grumpy old man.

Ron Stringer
11th March 2007, 23:40
Luckily I didn't go deaf and I agree entirely about the adverts. Must be another grumpy old man.

Can I, as another grumpy old man/RO, add another pet hate of the TV programmes? That is dramas with background music that is so obtrusive that the dialogue cannot be understood. For the commercial breaks I have the solution - the 'Mute' button of the remote control - but I can't use that to shut out the background music without also losing the dialogue that I want to hear.

This is a purely TV thing, because I listen to plays on the radio and they are never so stupid as to drown out the dialogue. End of today's grouse.

raybnz
12th March 2007, 10:11
When I first went to sea other engineers told me that Wireless Operators were always a bit strange due to the dits and dahs they had to listen too. Some how had an effect of the gray matter.

They always seemed to be able to drink the same beer, tell yarns and eat the same food as we did. But something I noticed was they all kept strange watches.

benjidog
12th March 2007, 11:45
Marconi Sahib keeps all kinds of strange things - not just watches! ;)

Brian

K urgess
12th March 2007, 12:51
I try, Brian.
The main aim to is to reinforce all the preconceptions about sparkies.
I enjoy being a bit strange. And I do have some strange watches.
Hence the nickname(LOL)

Rusty
12th March 2007, 13:06
To avoid going deaf one of the tips I was given on my first voyage to sea as a junior R/O was to place the headphones just in front of the ears, so that the sound came through the skull, rather than blasting directly onto the eardrums. For normal watchkeeping, I would leave the headphones plugged in and lying on the desk beside me.

Sparkies kept GMT watchkeeping hours rather than ship's time. I used to keep my wristwatch on GMT, so that no matter how good the party was I could always drag myself away in time to be on watch.

By nature sparkies were self-sufficient loners, responsible only to the old man and not part of a team, (except on passenger liners of course) as were the mates and engineers. Nobody really knew what we did. We had to keep our mouths shut and be on good terms with everyone.

Seven years at sea certainly didn't affect MY hearing, which at the age of 70 is better than my wife's - although she was a primary school teacher and the noise they have to put up with is horrendous.

As to the t.v. ads I, too, invariably use the mute button for the stupid adverts - the trouble is you have to watch the last few to avoid missing the start of the next section. There's a fortune waiting for some genius to come up with a device to do this automatically. If there are two programmes on at the same time, one on a commercial channel and the other on BBC, then I always record the commercial one, so that I can fast forward through the adverts.

Rusty

trotterdotpom
12th March 2007, 17:13
On Downunder TV, the adverts are generally better than the programs, so, when the volume goes up, I come out of the toilet and have a look.

I seem to have severe hearing loss in one ear. I put it down to those "tropical static crashes" - who can I sue?

I wonder if some of those old time "tropical clashes" are the reason I spend so much time in the toilet?

John T.

Buoy
12th March 2007, 17:50
I recall having to write a report as an "expert witness" for some legal eagles who were plying a case of industrial injury for an ex R/O who was claiming impaired hearing as a result of watchkeeping. I have to say that after 17 years of R/O watchkeeping I remain perfectly nominal!!!

mikeg
12th March 2007, 19:18
Seven years at sea certainly didn't affect MY hearing, which at the age of 70 is better than my wife's - although she was a primary school teacher and the noise they have to put up with is horrendous.
Rusty

Providing R/O's have been sensible regarding long term listening levels then I can't see any reason why their occupation should lead to any long term hearing empairment. In an engine room without ear-defenders would be a risk area but the radio room listening at sensible speaker or headphone volumes does not reach anywhere near those levels. I was 20 years as an R/O and my hearing is consistent with my age having some expected age related HF loss. There are plenty of hearing tests on the web that will give you a good idea about your hearing condition providing you can connect a reasonable pair headphones up to the computer. It is interesting to run tests for each ear, don't expect exactly the same results though.

Mike

gwzm
12th March 2007, 20:00
It wasn't listening to morse that did for my hearing, it was working in the final test area of a computer manufacturers with umpteen large tape drives, all minus their covers, with vacuum and pressure pumps sucking and blowing. That caused a horrendous level of white noise. My hearing loss was later corrected by an operation to replace the stapes (small bones in the inner ear) with plastic ones. That was done (goodness how time flies....) 30 years ago and still working fine.

John/gwzm

tedc
12th March 2007, 21:37
Of course, the "Singapore Ear" infection I picked up in, er, Singapore might have ultimately been the cause of my hearing loss.

Apparently the bugs are floating around in tropical swimming pools just waiting to get into ones lugholes!

I remember getting this massive pain in the inner ear just after we left Pulau Bukam and remaining in agony until arrival in Japan.

The Japanese doctors were terrific - they inserted a large roll of lint into the ear -soaked in some unction or other - and the pain went away.

I had never realised how long that ear passage was or how long the China Sea passage seems when you are in pain!!!

Keithbyatt
14th March 2007, 19:00
Hi Marconi wallah. Ref tv with AGC. Which one? I also hate the volumew increase on Sky when the Ads come on. Joined Royal Signals TA after leaving BI. Found we had radio D11/ R210, just like the HF set on the ship. Great fun.

K urgess
14th March 2007, 19:33
Keith

The TV is from Currys made by DMTech, who I'd never heard of.
The model number is LU20DV. Which means it's a 20" TFT LCD with a built in DVD
It's probably no longer stocked.
To confuse things even more the AGC is called AVL. I didn't find out it had this until I got it home.
Funnily enough it was the Memsahib's choice not mine.(LOL)
I would've gone for a widescreen even for a bedroom TV.
It's been good so far but as usual when you have a gimmick like a built in DVD you never use it.:sweat:

Cheers
Kris

Stuart
14th March 2007, 22:34
It's like going bald, becoming overweight, having to wear glasses and getting old. We don't admit to any of it so I'm not deaf.(EEK)


Cheers
Kris

Looks a bit like my CV

Check List
Going Bald No - (Gone Bald Yes)
Overweight No - (but my wife says yes)
Getting Old Physically, yes (Mentally still a teenager.)
Going Deaf Got fitted with hearing aids last week.
Drink too much Only when in port.
Ex - R/O Yes - shame about the ex bit!

marinero
15th March 2007, 18:48
I don't know about morse code making you deaf but I heard reading Port Said Bibles certainly was a cause of deafness.
Regards(Thumb)

I made a mistake, I should have said blind not deaf. I hope I didn't mislead anyone. I put it down to old age you know!
Regards(Thumb)

Robinj
17th March 2007, 01:44
I made a mistake, I should have said blind not deaf. I hope I didn't mislead anyone. I put it down to old age you know!
Regards(Thumb)

Definately reading to many Port Said Bibles.

A Wighter
17th March 2007, 08:37
Hearing loss may be one thing...but there appears to be no mention of a possibly worse potential problem....that being the big C. Imagine working for years next to high powered transmitters 100W..500W 1KW....anyone care to comment on that...my thought is the statistics may be a lot worse??

marinero
17th March 2007, 15:33
Hearing loss may be one thing...but there appears to be no mention of a possibly worse potential problem....that being the big C. Imagine working for years next to high powered transmitters 100W..500W 1KW....anyone care to comment on that...my thought is the statistics may be a lot worse??

Hi Andy.
That could be frightening.
I wonder if there are any statistics kept on that, or would that lead the way to litigation?
Regards
(Thumb)

Ron Stringer
17th March 2007, 22:36
there appears to be no mention of a possibly worse potential problem....that being the big C. Imagine working for years next to high powered transmitters 100W..500W 1KW....anyone care to comment on that...my thought is the statistics may be a lot worse??
Funny you should raise that question. Last time I was in the barber's shop I met an old colleague who worked in the marine transmitter test department at the factory. He has the same idea and reeled off a list of former workmates that have contracted cancer in later years. (I am one such.)

And out of five in our department when I retired, 4 got cancer. How anyone would prove a link between our illnesses and our exposure to radiation is another matter.

By the way, four of us have survived the experience so far, so a good lawyer (is that an oxymoron?) could possibly persuade a jury that we might have died had we not been protected by our prior radiation treatment!

benjidog
17th March 2007, 23:19
I think you have hit the nail on the head when you talk about proving a link Ron.

There have been mass studies done on whether cancer can be caused by radiation from all sorts of things - power lines, mobile phones etc. and they have been inconclusive. I can understand why you might be concerned about being next to high power devices though and there could be something in it for all I know. I guess land-based radio transmitter staff would be subject to the same or greater exposures.

To prove a case you would need damn good statistical proof. Anecdotal information about who has/has not got cancer from a small sample is statistically inconclusive and this type of result can easily happen by chance. There are also other questions like what other risks would you guys be exposed to in your line of business and whether the cancers are of the same kind.

You only have to think about how long it has taken to get acceptance of claims about asbestos to realise how difficult an area this would be.

It is great to hear that you and your friends have been successfully treated. I wish you all long and happy lives.

Regards,

Brian

Ron Stringer
17th March 2007, 23:32
You are so right Brian. However I was only commenting on the coincidence of seeing such a reference on this site so soon after meeting up with my former workmate (hadn't seen him for about 15 years) and discussing just that question. I've no idea what caused my illness and I don't suppose my colleagues have either. Whatever the reason, I have no intention of trying to blame someone else, seek compensation or investigate possibilities. Time is too precious.

Dave Woods
18th March 2007, 12:07
Following on from what A Whighter wrote a few ago.

I spent 30 add years in the radio room, albeit the last few with Satellite equipment and my hearing has not diminished. In 1973 I sailed with the first Conqueror transmitters (mine was No. 3) on Harrison’s W class bulkers. I started with blinding headaches whenever the transmitter was on especially after we had TOR fitted in late 73. At the time I thought nothing of them and never as far as I can recollect mentioned them to anyone as no sooner had I gone back to my cabin they stopped. Isn’t hindsight a wonderful thing) Whether it was the noise the transmitter made, or the high power radiation I do not know.



From Bendjidog “ I guess land-based radio transmitter staff would be subject to the same or greater exposures.”


I am not sure that the land based R/O’s would have had a problem; their transmitters were housed some distance from the operating point.

Best regards

Dave Woods.

Brian Twyman
18th March 2007, 14:05
Our eldest son was a Radio Operator for NZ Post (as it was then) in the 1980s and spent time at ZLD Auckland Radio, ZLC Chatham Islands Radio and ZLB Awarua Radio. He suddenly fell ill, was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia and died ten days later at the age of 20. We were told it had nothing to do with his radio work, but we have often wondered whether exposure to RF was a factor. I guess we will never know.
Brian

King Ratt
18th March 2007, 14:19
Brian..that is so sad to hear about your eldest son.
I often wondered if living and working in a fairly high RF environment was unhealthy. Naval vessels and RFAs paint a red ring on the deck around the bases of HF transmitting whips and specify that one should not linger inside the red marking. Radiation hazards in the naval service are well documented and I refer to non ionising radiation not the type from radioactive substances.
Regards.

R651400
18th March 2007, 15:24
After leaving the sea for the usual reason ie marriage, I followed my radio career through two then Government departments and was amazed as in my case, at how many of my colleagues MN and Services, fathered daughters only.

K urgess
18th March 2007, 15:32
First child born one year after swallowing the anchor - girl.
Second child born 4 years later after moving away from radio and into computers - boy.
Having been exposed to an awful lot of radar emmissions I'm suprised to have any offspring at all.
Practice makes perfect.(LOL)

King Ratt
18th March 2007, 16:22
My 3 offspring are all boys and all conceived in the fields (RF fields).

trotterdotpom
18th March 2007, 16:48
My radar instructor at Hull Tech was involved in the early days of radar with the army during WW2. He told us they had great times opening the waveguides and cooking sausages in them. Unfortunately, he didn't have the foresight to call them "microwave ovens" and get a patent. He was ok at that time, but voiced concerns about what they may have done to themselves and, even worse, their kids.

John T.

K urgess
18th March 2007, 18:47
This may have been the bloke that taught us instant tests for radar transmission.
Excellent place to have a radar course on the same floor of Hull Tech as the nurses.[=P]
Disconnect waveguide above transceiver unit.
(thereby flooding the metal box it's fitted in with RF energy)
Tape a neon lamp to the end of a ruler.
Push the ruler up the side of the waveguide and measure at what distance it goes out. (it'll strike when in the RF stream)
Failing the above or for a quick check us your finger to draw a spark of the inner edge of the waveguide. Not too often or frequently or your finger will go numb (cooked).
No neon light or no spark - radar not working - change magnetron then TR cell.(Thumb)
It hasn't effected me in the least(==D)

Derek Roger
18th March 2007, 21:04
Dont think Morse caused Sparks to go deaf ; Daft yes !!!!! Derek

benjidog
18th March 2007, 23:31
Following on from what A Whighter wrote a few ago.

I spent 30 add years in the radio room, albeit the last few with Satellite equipment and my hearing has not diminished. In 1973 I sailed with the first Conqueror transmitters (mine was No. 3) on Harrison’s W class bulkers. I started with blinding headaches whenever the transmitter was on especially after we had TOR fitted in late 73. At the time I thought nothing of them and never as far as I can recollect mentioned them to anyone as no sooner had I gone back to my cabin they stopped. Isn’t hindsight a wonderful thing) Whether it was the noise the transmitter made, or the high power radiation I do not know.



From Bendjidog “ I guess land-based radio transmitter staff would be subject to the same or greater exposures.”


I am not sure that the land based R/O’s would have had a problem; their transmitters were housed some distance from the operating point.

Best regards

Dave Woods.

Dave,

Good point about the R/Os on shore, but I was thinking more of the maintenance staff. I heard an story many years ago about some demonstrators climbing a radio mast somewhere in the Midlands and getting sterilised as a result. Not sure if there was anything in that of if it was just another urban myth, but I guess your goolies would probably not be too efficient after being microwaved!

Regards,

Brian

trotterdotpom
19th March 2007, 01:08
This may have been the bloke that taught us instant tests for radar transmission.
(==D)

Could well have been, Kris - think his name was Bill.

The neon on the ruler trick was ok, but don't use a ruler with one of those brass strips down the side!

Someone else told me that if you looked down a waveguide while the radar was transmitting it made your eyeball wobble - I never had the nerve to try that.

A few years ago, at Channel 9 TV in Brisbane an eccentric character climbed up the transmission mast to protest something or other. The station saw this as a handy bit of news coverage. Unfortunately, the broadcast resulted in a spate of climbers, including the original one, again and again. It was decided not to publicise further episodes. I worked there for a while and the general concensus amongst the engineers was that it was better to have completed your breeding program before climbing the mast.

John T.

BeerSailor
19th March 2007, 01:32
The radar instructor at Plymouth sea school recommended the open waveguide treatment for wart removal. I never had the nerve to test this.

Derek Roger
19th March 2007, 01:47
Not to make light of the subject of the big C as from what I have read in this thread there seems to be some statiscal connection .

However I was warned by more than one Sparks not to " Bronzie " on the monkey Island as there was a good possibility of becoming sterile from the Radar ; whips etc .

I noted however they " Sparks " were always up there for their " Bronzie " so concluded ( incorrectly or otherwise ) that it was a ploy to keep us lesser mortals out of their territory ( forward of the funnel casing was always quite a bit quieter than aft )

Strange thing was that when we had wives aboard they were always enticed to the "monkey Island " .

Once we knew that ( the engineers ) we on the 12 to 4 would take the unusual step of climbing up the ladder on the inside of the funnel casing ; open the hatch !! and check there was not too much smoke from the exhaust ( and take a look ! )

Remarkable what they would wear ( not wear ) when they thought they were out of sight . Never thought to take a camera ??? ( opportunity for a SN popular site missed )

Derek
The connection to deafness is I suppose somewhat linked to the fact the Monkey Island was quieter than the Boat Deck. As far as occupational deafness is concerned the engineers on Medium speed diesels had the worst of it . We had ear defenders but one could not wear them for long in the tropics as they would fill up with sweat . most of us had ( and I still do to this day ) have an abnormal build up of wax in the ears which is natures way of protecting the ear drums if exposed to too much high level sound .

Moulder
19th March 2007, 02:03
In 1973 I sailed with the first Conqueror transmitters (mine was No. 3) on Harrison’s W class bulkers. I started with blinding headaches whenever the transmitter was on especially after we had TOR fitted in late 73.

Dave Woods.

Hi Dave,

I sailed with No. 7 in 1974 - they could pack a punch! I could actually stop the ship when transmitting on 6Mhz.

Regards,

Steve.
(Thumb)

Buoy
19th March 2007, 02:16
I think we are probably ok guys. After all, the tx's didn't radiate continuously did they? We only did the dots and dashes bit, and the short bursts for RTT. I guess full power R/T would be our longest exposure. I (somehow) managed two children - one of each - during my time at sea.

I always suspected that the guys who designed the gin palaces/fishing boats you see mainly around the USA coast had some sort of a grudge - just look at where they placed the radar scanners in relation to where the owners sit. Most of them would be directly in line with their tackle, and not fishing tackle either!

A Wighter
19th March 2007, 08:38
Well it was a passing thought but it seems to have provoked a few interesting responses....several of the vessels I was attached to were equipped with two 1kw transmitters in the Radio Rooms. They were very much in use, there was almost no such thing as immediate contact on HF even with the Commonwealth Area System, or afterwards when it was disbanded...and they were high volume vessels with W/T and R/T using both higher and lower sidebands!!. Ah happy days though!!.

mikeg
19th March 2007, 12:52
I think we are probably ok guys. After all, the tx's didn't radiate continuously did they? We only did the dots and dashes bit, and the short bursts for RTT. I guess full power R/T would be our longest exposure. I (somehow) managed two children - one of each - during my time at sea.

I always suspected that the guys who designed the gin palaces/fishing boats you see mainly around the USA coast had some sort of a grudge - just look at where they placed the radar scanners in relation to where the owners sit. Most of them would be directly in line with their tackle, and not fishing tackle either!

The only time I can recall the tx radiating continously other than r/t was on VLCC's for DF purposes on a helicopter drop and that was only till the chopper got a good bearing.

Mike

Dave Woods
19th March 2007, 13:17
Hi Dave,

I sailed with No. 7 in 1974 - they could pack a punch! I could actually stop the ship when transmitting on 6Mhz.

Regards,

Steve.
(Thumb)

Steve,

Funny you should say that about stoping the ship! from the back of my mind the one on the "Warrior" did the same thing on 22 Mhz, but I do not remember it happening on sister ships Wayfarer or Wanderer.

Best regards

Dave.

K urgess
20th March 2007, 01:31
I wrote this nearly 40 years ago on the radio room typewriter while we were in the middle of the Indian Ocean. I was reminded of it by this thread and thought it might amuse. If it doesn’t, tough, I enjoyed copying it anyway. Brought back some happy memories. I admit to being no Conrad or Hemingway.

“What’s the recipe to-day, Jim”.
Radio one sounding like it always does over a ship’s radio when listening at extreme range. Fading and clipped.
Cold winter day with shining sun and shiny sea. Bitterly cold but with that sort of washed out watery winter sunshine like after snow. Crisp, clean, salt tangy air.
Wearing a beautifully warm heavy blue uniform jacket and coming out of the warm steam-heated saloon onto a deck that smells clean and new for a change. Breath coming out in wisps of foggy steam.
The southern coast of Ireland on the port side or the low craggy outline of Wales on the starboard side. Or the white cliffs of Dover on any side, it doesn’t really matter. Although it’s usually more contentment making to be approaching Anglesey and thinking of wet/foggy docks and how in the early hours of tomorrow the “bums and stiffs” will be onboard trying to interest you in life insurance, taxis to Lime Street, clothes or anything but the only thing you’re interested in, which is paying off and leaving for a home that’s only existed in your dreams for two or four or seven or seventeen months.

Carrying a cup of hot, thick, steaming tea that would melt a spoon or at least, support one upright all the way from the saloon to the bridge. Climbing to the bridge up outside ladders ‘cos you’re a masochist and wouldn’t even mind freezing to death on such a glorious day. Going into the wheelhouse and greeting the third mate jovially who answers curtly because he’ll be glad when he sees the last of you after seeing you every waking minute and is immune to the glory of our mother the sea because he’s been at sea for six months longer than you and has seen it all before.

Looking at the chart as if it was a Leonardo da Vinci original and deciding that, no matter how hard you tried, you’d never understand how a ship could crawl around like a drunken worm and nobody know where it was. Especially when there was a personally sweated over and nurtured miracle of electronics on the bridge that you only had to glance into to know exactly, to the inch, where you were.

Going into a radio room lit only by yellow white sunshine pouring through the ports. A narrow room cluttered with a collection of obsolete cranky equipment that you love anyway ‘cos it was such a nice day and it couldn’t possibly break down now. By five past nine you’ve decided that even Portishead Radio isn’t such a bad bloke because he actually said “morning gents” or some such inanity before plunging into the tedium of a traffic list that for a sweet everloving change did not contain those four ghastly letters that you sometimes wake up thinking of in morse.

Taking the message from the Old Man without the usual pained put upon expression ‘cos, what the hell, it’s probably the last, he hasn’t been a bad old sod considering and you’ve got to send a TR to Anglesey anyway. Oh, the joy of sitting down and just sending GLV a couple of times instead of GKL forever. And then come memories of how, many months ago, when Northforeland wouldn’t answer a poor inexperienced young slob who wasn’t sure he was doing it right and must be doing something wrong ‘cos he’s not answering and everybody is carrying on normally as if you didn’t exist. So you checked aerials, transmitters, batteries, connections and even checked to make sure you were, in fact, listening to 500. Ah, the naiveté of youth!

You have now wandered the seven seas in true Conrad tradition for so long that, you hope anyway, your walk now contains an element of the classic mariner’s roll. You’ve acquired a suntan that’ll dazzle the dollies, it being mid-winter at home. You can’t wait to snag some poor defenceless wedding guest on some lonely road and, fixing him with your salty stare, tell him all that passed between you and the albatross.

Sudden excitement as Anglesey looms upon the horizon looking like a purple and green hump-backed Nessie. The gulls crying their delight at the unsurpassed delicacy of slops a la Irish Sea as the galley boy feeds the fauna with what’s left of breakfast.

And what is this? This light brown and grey, slate-roofed mansion that graces a nearby headland among forests of primeval radio masts and festoons of grey wire-like creepers? Could it be the source of the agonising screech that dits and dahs through your headphones every so often. Catching you unawares creeping up behind you and shouting in your ears no matter how low you turn the gain? So that’s where it comes from; imagining a return to Roman days and druids and human sacrifices on the altar of an operating position; before the carven image of a souped-up Atalanta.

White man’s magic.
Oh well two can play at that game.
Catch him all unawares, no need to tune since it is from the last call.
Not a silence period.
Now. Quickly, before he senses you creeping through the ether like a hunter at the stalk.
GLV QRU? Got you!
(Imagining operating personnel running around screaming in pain and trying vainly to tear ears from heads.)
DE GLV NIL.
Good God, have his ears got built in AGC?
So you long for the day that you can sneak up on him with the new transmitter and beat him senseless before reducing the whole island to ashes with the ultimate in transmitted power.

If only you hadn’t turned the receiver gain all the way up in order to hear every nuance of the agonised screeches that were to come. Oh well, maybe you’ll be able to hear again by time leave is at an end.

A chipped and dirty mug appears at your elbow as if by magic. It contains the result of an advanced swimming party’s foray to the distant Mersey estuary suitably heated and sweetened. Personal steward service the brochure said. Well at least the thought was there and one could order impressively next time one went to an Indian restaurant.

(Just remember that this was the product of my over-active imagination and does not necessarily bear any relation to reality)

tunatownshipwreck
20th March 2007, 06:25
Great piece, thanks.

John Leary
20th March 2007, 12:34
Just for a brief moment I was transported back in time. The feeling of anticipation of a homecoming along with the sadness of a voyage nearing its end is captured beautifully and was sheer magic. Many thanks
Regards
John

ei6jf
21st March 2007, 17:03
Off-topic I know but this may be of interest to some of you http://www.radiomaritimeday.org/

Mark

hawkey01
24th March 2007, 18:13
Umm! deaf, what, shout up a bit. TV ads yes the mute button is fabulous. Also we watch BBC and record commercial progs so I can fast forward through the ads.

Well for those of you who can remember the Pacific Watch - we jokingly used to say that "You had to be able to hear a mouse fart in a bucket at 50yds to be any use on that sked."
Hawkey01

Chillytoes
25th March 2007, 08:52
Sparkies were always a little odd. I think it was part of the selection process to weed out the normal applicants.
A chief engineer I sailed with used to tell the (true) story of a man who had always been a "ham" whilst working at a bank or some similar institution. This fellow, late in life finally got to fullfil a dream by becoming a sparkie. Trouble was he had all sorts of trouble with the ship's installation, couldn't send or received with any reliability. One day the old man was, as usual complaining about the radio problem and this new sparky said "I don't know, but there seems to be a radio dead spot on this ship". The chief, standing nearby, couldn't help himself. "Yeah," be said, "And I know just where it is. Right between your bloody ears!"

NoMoss
25th March 2007, 11:14
Speaking as an old ex R/O I wondered the same thing and when I found it getting a bit difficult to hear speaking on the TV went for an ear test. I thought I might be able to blame my previous occupation. The test showed I had normal hearing for someone my age with a dip at one point on the range which when questioned the tester admitted was about the frequency of a woman's voice. My wife doesn't believe me but the tester said if I wasn't looking at my wife when she spoke I might miss the first few words. I believe speaking on modern TV production is not as clear as the old films where everything is clearly heard. And I am a grumpy old man!

NoMoss

NoMoss
25th March 2007, 11:22
I wrote this nearly 40 years ago on the radio room typewriter while we were in the middle of the Indian Ocean. I was reminded of it by this thread and thought it might amuse. If it doesn’t, tough, I enjoyed copying it anyway. Brought back some happy memories. I admit to being no Conrad or Hemingway.

“What’s the recipe to-day, Jim”.
Radio one sounding like it always does over a ship’s radio when listening at extreme range. Fading and clipped.
Cold winter day with shining sun and shiny sea. Bitterly cold but with that sort of washed out watery winter sunshine like after snow. Crisp, clean, salt tangy air.
Wearing a beautifully warm heavy blue uniform jacket and coming out of the warm steam-heated saloon onto a deck that smells clean and new for a change. Breath coming out in wisps of foggy steam.
The southern coast of Ireland on the port side or the low craggy outline of Wales on the starboard side. Or the white cliffs of Dover on any side, it doesn’t really matter. Although it’s usually more contentment making to be approaching Anglesey and thinking of wet/foggy docks and how in the early hours of tomorrow the “bums and stiffs” will be onboard trying to interest you in life insurance, taxis to Lime Street, clothes or anything but the only thing you’re interested in, which is paying off and leaving for a home that’s only existed in your dreams for two or four or seven or seventeen months.

Carrying a cup of hot, thick, steaming tea that would melt a spoon or at least, support one upright all the way from the saloon to the bridge. Climbing to the bridge up outside ladders ‘cos you’re a masochist and wouldn’t even mind freezing to death on such a glorious day. Going into the wheelhouse and greeting the third mate jovially who answers curtly because he’ll be glad when he sees the last of you after seeing you every waking minute and is immune to the glory of our mother the sea because he’s been at sea for six months longer than you and has seen it all before.

Looking at the chart as if it was a Leonardo da Vinci original and deciding that, no matter how hard you tried, you’d never understand how a ship could crawl around like a drunken worm and nobody know where it was. Especially when there was a personally sweated over and nurtured miracle of electronics on the bridge that you only had to glance into to know exactly, to the inch, where you were.

Going into a radio room lit only by yellow white sunshine pouring through the ports. A narrow room cluttered with a collection of obsolete cranky equipment that you love anyway ‘cos it was such a nice day and it couldn’t possibly break down now. By five past nine you’ve decided that even Portishead Radio isn’t such a bad bloke because he actually said “morning gents” or some such inanity before plunging into the tedium of a traffic list that for a sweet everloving change did not contain those four ghastly letters that you sometimes wake up thinking of in morse.

Taking the message from the Old Man without the usual pained put upon expression ‘cos, what the hell, it’s probably the last, he hasn’t been a bad old sod considering and you’ve got to send a TR to Anglesey anyway. Oh, the joy of sitting down and just sending GLV a couple of times instead of GKL forever. And then come memories of how, many months ago, when Northforeland wouldn’t answer a poor inexperienced young slob who wasn’t sure he was doing it right and must be doing something wrong ‘cos he’s not answering and everybody is carrying on normally as if you didn’t exist. So you checked aerials, transmitters, batteries, connections and even checked to make sure you were, in fact, listening to 500. Ah, the naiveté of youth!

You have now wandered the seven seas in true Conrad tradition for so long that, you hope anyway, your walk now contains an element of the classic mariner’s roll. You’ve acquired a suntan that’ll dazzle the dollies, it being mid-winter at home. You can’t wait to snag some poor defenceless wedding guest on some lonely road and, fixing him with your salty stare, tell him all that passed between you and the albatross.

Sudden excitement as Anglesey looms upon the horizon looking like a purple and green hump-backed Nessie. The gulls crying their delight at the unsurpassed delicacy of slops a la Irish Sea as the galley boy feeds the fauna with what’s left of breakfast.

And what is this? This light brown and grey, slate-roofed mansion that graces a nearby headland among forests of primeval radio masts and festoons of grey wire-like creepers? Could it be the source of the agonising screech that dits and dahs through your headphones every so often. Catching you unawares creeping up behind you and shouting in your ears no matter how low you turn the gain? So that’s where it comes from; imagining a return to Roman days and druids and human sacrifices on the altar of an operating position; before the carven image of a souped-up Atalanta.

White man’s magic.
Oh well two can play at that game.
Catch him all unawares, no need to tune since it is from the last call.
Not a silence period.
Now. Quickly, before he senses you creeping through the ether like a hunter at the stalk.
GLV QRU? Got you!
(Imagining operating personnel running around screaming in pain and trying vainly to tear ears from heads.)
DE GLV NIL.
Good God, have his ears got built in AGC?
So you long for the day that you can sneak up on him with the new transmitter and beat him senseless before reducing the whole island to ashes with the ultimate in transmitted power.

If only you hadn’t turned the receiver gain all the way up in order to hear every nuance of the agonised screeches that were to come. Oh well, maybe you’ll be able to hear again by time leave is at an end.

A chipped and dirty mug appears at your elbow as if by magic. It contains the result of an advanced swimming party’s foray to the distant Mersey estuary suitably heated and sweetened. Personal steward service the brochure said. Well at least the thought was there and one could order impressively next time one went to an Indian restaurant.

(Just remember that this was the product of my over-active imagination and does not necessarily bear any relation to reality)

That certainly brought back memories. I wonder if I could use that in a newsletter I edit? I am the only ex R/O in the association and get fed up pandering to the other departments' needs.

K urgess
25th March 2007, 15:21
NoMoss

Help yourself.
I hope they enjoy it.

Cheers
Kris

NoMoss
25th March 2007, 17:09
Thanks for that - next edition due out in June.

benjidog
25th March 2007, 20:52
Nomoss,

I hope you will give SN a plug in your article and provide a credit to Marconi Sahib for his memories.

Regards,

Brian

steve Coombs
25th March 2007, 23:33
All the ROs I met or sailed with were mad before they started (including me) didnt go deaf though

NoMoss
27th March 2007, 19:12
Will certainly give SN a plug and urge our members to sign up. I might include a health warning that signing on can seriously damage anything else you want to make time for. It is definately addictive! Marconi Sahib will get full credit too.

benjidog
28th March 2007, 00:38
Thanks Ted,

Sorry my comment sounded rude, but we have had a few people joining recently who appear to just want to lift other people's stuff and give nothing in return. I find that both annoying and depressing. This site is all about giving and helping one another rather than taking as I am sure you can see from the content.

Regards,

Brian

Portred
31st March 2007, 19:24
On my first ship, it was build in 1941, the radio shack was in the engineers accommodation,
You could always hear that distinctive ''Buzzing'' sound of morse code being sent and received.

It was especially loud when the signal was good.

I was fortunate to be in a cabin on the opposite side of the accommodation.

Being a young fellow of 20 and somewhat naive about worldy matters, especially if you listened to all the yarns told at smoko.

I was greatly concerned about the consequences of my hormone driven solo nocturnal gratification sessions, insomuch as, one is reputed to become blind as a result of prolonged activity.

My thoughts then were turned to the young engineer who occupied the cabin next to the Radio Shack.

Poor sod, I thought, he could possibly end up both blind and deaf by the end of this trip!

Cheers,

Portred

tedc
26th October 2007, 12:24
"hormone driven solo nocturnal gratification sessions"

Hi Portred!

That made me laugh - Thanks!

It also reminded me of the times when R/Os would have to charge passengers by the word (i.e. each word cost money individually.) in telegrams back to shore.

You wouldn't believe how many words could be dropped out of a sentence to save a few bob...!

I guess some of the R/Os in here will have great examples of sentence shortening...!

[=P]

p.s. this was not a criticism - I really admire your phraseology!

Moulder
26th October 2007, 12:49
It also reminded me of the times when R/Os would have to charge passengers by the word (i.e. each word cost money individually.) in telegrams back to shore.

You wouldn't believe how many words could be dropped out of a sentence to save a few bob...!

I guess some of the R/Os in here will have great examples of sentence shortening...!

[=P]

p.s. this was not a criticism - I really admire your phraseology!

You'll probably remember when the charging regime was changed to allow 10 characters per chargeable word - the prudent RO could often save a couple of bob for the owners and crew by a little creative editing.

e.g. - ETA/PILOT 0800/12TH - 2 chargeable words.

HAPPY/BDAY LOVE/AND MISS/YOUXX - 3 chargeable words.


These kids texting nowadays know nuffink!!

Regards,

Steve.
(Thumb)

athinai
26th October 2007, 13:36
Hi Portred,
The Wife and I Enjoyed Your ''Dumbfounded piece'' Very Funny indeed,
She said she hopes you are still practicing for the real thing., Hi

Oh By the Way, you heard about the Chap who was told he would go blind if he continued with the practice,
Asked the Doctor if he could do it a little and wear Glasses.,


B/Gud

John Campbell
26th October 2007, 21:41
I try, Brian.
The main aim to is to reinforce all the preconceptions about sparkies.
I enjoy being a bit strange. And I do have some strange watches.
Hence the nickname(LOL)

Kris,
on my first trip as Master I had a most unforgettable experience with a R/O
.
Sparks and a new Chief Off joined in Singapore at the Anchorage, where we were taking stores and bunkers . The ship was a jumboised T2 bound for Bahrain in ballast.

Heaving up the anchor and ringing full away as we proceed up the Mallacca St. I went to my office to compose the departure cable to give to the Marconi Sahib to send. I had met him briefly as he joined and relieved the home-going R/O and gathered that he was a regular employee and had been with the Company before.
I heard a scraping outside my door and soon realised that Sparks was taking down inspection panels in the alleyway with a screwdriver. I asked him what was going on and he replied that he was hearing voices behind the panels and he started shouting to them.

I gave him the message and told him to send it to London. Soon he was back at my door saying that he had f....d the Receiver and following him into the radio office I soon saw that he had snapped the cord which moved the wavelength indicating bar on the Marconi Radio Receiver and he said that he would not be able to fix it so he could not send or receive.

It was dinner time and I told him go to bed and get a sleep as I thought he may be having the DTs. I started to eat my soup when the watch seacunny came into the Saloon saying "Captain- Marconi Sahib on deck come quick". Following the Seacunny I ran out and we found the Sparks fully dressed in shore going clothes with his bags walking up and down near the manifold amidships. It was pitch dark and we were at full speed. The Thrird mate had the Aldis on us. I asked the Sparks for an explanation and he said he was looking for the gangway to go ashore.

Back up to his room we went and I went for the Ship's Captains Medical Guide and ended up with Chloropromazine which I tried the Sparks with. He was reluctant to take it but he did. Then I decided to lock him in the radio shack but as you know. It cannot be done on a T2 so I decided to tie the door handle of his door to the door of his bathroom across the alleyway.

Just as the seacunny and I were putting the final turn on the lashings the Sparks gave us both a near heartattack by barging in tothe Alleyway through the mosquito door. He had got through the porthole and suffered a bruising by the considerable drop to the deck but was Ok. We told him we were untangling the heaving line and I then orderd him to strip off his clothes and get into bed. I put a watch on him all night and in the morning he seemed better but not able to do much. We had a 3rd Eng who was good with gadgets and he restrung the receiver so that he could tune in.

I had to alert the Company to send out a releif sparks and by good luck a sister ship was going the same way with us and you can imagine the painfully process with the morse lamp getting our story to London.

By the time we reached Bahrain he was sending and receiving but was very truculent towards all who spoke to him and we were rather afraid he might go over the wall or even attack us. The Medical Guide was no help and I could get no help via radio for obvious reasons.

At Bahrain the new Sparks was waiting with the white coated attendents for the of going lad and I heaved a sigh and was delighted tosee an end to that adventure but it sure was an experience.

I heard later a few years after that the poor soul ,who had resumed his career as a R/O, had been drowned ,falling between the ship and and quay on returning to the ship after a night out.

The Sparky was a very necessery cog and I appreciated their help during my time at sea. He was the only one which I could say was Strange(K)

JC

K urgess
26th October 2007, 22:06
A sad and sobering story, John.

Numerous occasions I would join and be told that they hoped I was better than the last sparkie who used to hold conversations with lifeboats or never sobered up enough to keep a watch.

Mad until proven sane I think you could call the majority of us.

I prefer to think of it as being easily led and proving to be just as mad as the rest of the people onboard in the end.[=P]

Cheers
Kris

boulton
26th October 2007, 22:39
I enjoy being a bit strange. . . .(LOL)

Marconi Sahib, you can put the inclination to "strangeness", down to your adoptive nationality of been a Yorkshireman.

Believe me, I know.

trotterdotpom
27th October 2007, 14:25
John Campbell, most people would end up like that after trying to re-string the cord on an Atalanta receiver - it's a wonder the 3rd Eng. didn't go the same way.

John T. (Quack)

tell
29th October 2007, 01:48
I did hear somewhere that playing with your instrument made you blind

tedc
31st October 2007, 21:44
Hi Steve!

I recall "alleged" transgressions aboard a very large passenger vessel, which must remain nameless - where it was "alleged" that some R/Os were booted for shortening the telegrams - in the days when cash was handed over for each word - and pocketing the difference.

I'm sure it was just a myth!

That would be in the late 1060s - anyone know more?

--. -... - - ..--..

K urgess
31st October 2007, 22:05
Just before or after the Battle of Hastings?[=P]
-.- .-. .. ...

AlexBooth
1st November 2007, 02:02
I don't know about deaf, a little bit wierd or loopy maybe - LOL
Actually I just heard a something yesterday from an 'old fashioned' Lecky who tells me that due to an accute shortage of electricians at sea it's become a 2nd profession for a lot of ex sparkies, well I guess hearing isn't necessarily a reqmnt, a touch of looniness maybe !
(Pint) (Smoke)

joller6
13th February 2008, 22:51
I was Radio Opeartor in the RAF and yes it did impair my Hearing after all those days and nights of ... --- etc,i now sufer from a constant ringing in the Ears have done now for over 42 years,but one seems to adjust to all these situations.
Mind you my Wife is now getting to talk louder and louder haha!!
joller6

jaydeeare
14th February 2008, 00:12
Some years ago I bumped in to an old classmate from when I was on my Sparks course. He was a virtual alcoholic. He claimed it was too much sea-time. He was with BP at the time

Whilst working in a previous Company, I met with two ex-Sparkies. Strange thing was that they both left the sea for more or less the same reason.

One because the vibration of the cutlery in the drawer in the Saloon seemed to be sending messages.

The other because of the vibration of the engines doing the same thing.

Did this effect affect anyone else?

Both were totally sane... well nearly. As for the first, I've never seen or heard of him since. I'd like to know if he's still about. I may check on the Missing Old Shipmates Forum to see if anyone knows his whereabouts.

K urgess
14th February 2008, 00:15
Hell yes.
Every creak was a morse message.
It was a lot better than counting sheep and got me to sleep a lot quicker on VLCCs fully laden with crude in the 70s.
Had to have something to take your mind off it. (POP)

jaydeeare
14th February 2008, 13:24
I wasn't aware they had sheep on tankers! Was it Welsh registered?

sparkie2182
14th February 2008, 23:20
the issue of high volume didnt really apply........ not for me, at least.
any strong signal would be immediately suppressed and dealt with in a straightforward manner.
the weak signals were distingished from their close "neighbours" by use of "fine tuning,bandwidth and, if applicable, b.f.o (a system of changing the tone of a morse signal) and, most importantly, the ability of the operator to concentrate on this weak signal to the exclusion of all others..........indeed...... everything else.

at college we were advised to listen to an orchestral piece of music, and pick out one single instrument, and concentrate on it alone.
initially, choose an obvious instrument, a drum maybe, then carry on over the months to distinguish one of the less clear intruments, light woodwind or whatever.
i found it to be a very good method of developing the concentration required to "pick out" weak signals when surrounded by the heavy stuff......:)

many of the r/o's here will be familiar with the almost "trance" like state which can be achieved sometimes when receiving morse.........particularly a long message......... news report or weather.
often i have totally "switched off"....... and watched my pen copying the incoming morse, having no idea what the message is about........the morse seemed to go directly from the ear to the pen or typewriter, apparantly without any deliberate mental process at all.
i particularly remember taking down a telegram which unexpectedly changed the language from english to german, then spanish...... it was quoting engineering manuals if i remember rightly.
the inclusion of "accented" letters brought me out of my reverie, and i noticed the flow of the pen on the paper wavered, but only for a second or two.....:)

happy days.............

steve Coombs
18th February 2008, 19:51
It was like being Hypnotized, then waking up and finding a message on the pad

K urgess
18th February 2008, 20:02
That's the way it should be.
Just like your automatic reaction to distress situations.
Having the gear ready for anything when things got a bit rough.
Jumping out of bed when the alarm clock went off for the first couple of weeks at home.

sparkie2182
18th February 2008, 21:16
thats just how it was steve................

Chris Isaac
19th February 2008, 00:07
As a deck officer I know that many cadets went partially blind from reading morse lamps...... or at least that's what they said made them almost blind[=P]

billyboy
20th February 2008, 23:11
An Anagram of "The morse code" is : "Here come dots "
(think i will go and lie down again now)

tunatownshipwreck
21st February 2008, 01:28
An Anagram of "The morse code" is : "Here come dots "
(think i will go and lie down again now)

You're dashing off?

Gareth Jones
21st February 2008, 02:18
I found that whenever I was either sending or receiving morse, if anyone spoke to me, I could understand what they said, and I knew what reply I wanted to make, but I could never speak until I stopped sending or receiving. Did anyone else find the same ?

Riptide
21st February 2008, 04:15
Can I, as another grumpy old man/RO, add another pet hate of the TV programmes? That is dramas with background music that is so obtrusive that the dialogue cannot be understood. For the commercial breaks I have the solution - the 'Mute' button of the remote control - but I can't use that to shut out the background music without also losing the dialogue that I want to hear.

This is a purely TV thing, because I listen to plays on the radio and they are never so stupid as to drown out the dialogue. End of today's grouse.

Oh & sub titles.must be a speed reader to follow them.Two words there for minutes,a full paragraph gone in secounds.Kenny.

mikeg
21st February 2008, 11:02
Can I, as another grumpy old man/RO, add another pet hate of the TV programmes? That is dramas with background music that is so obtrusive that the dialogue cannot be understood. .....
This is a purely TV thing, because I listen to plays on the radio and they are never so stupid as to drown out the dialogue. End of today's grouse.

Ron, that drives me nuts also. The tech term is a 'music bed' and it's very much in use on radio as well, not only the commercial stations the BBC were particularly bad at loud music beds as well. Thankfully many stations are now seeing sense. It's a bit like musak in the lift or out of speakers in the supermarket - its an intrusion, who wants it!!
Grumpy old man also...

PS I'm in the process of setting up a radio station www.nessfm.org
no music beds there!

Moulder
21st February 2008, 11:15
I found that whenever I was either sending or receiving morse, if anyone spoke to me, I could understand what they said, and I knew what reply I wanted to make, but I could never speak until I stopped sending or receiving. Did anyone else find the same ?

I did - but, I wonder if a female RO was thus affected?

Remember - a bloke can only do one thing at a time! [=P]

Steve.
(Thumb)

K urgess
21st February 2008, 11:19
Am I allowed a grouse?
Do modern programme makers automatically assume that we have the attention span of a goldfish.
Why do they have to give you a precis of the programme after the commercial break as if we've all forgotten what the hell it is were watching?
Bah Humbug(Cloud)

sparkie2182
21st February 2008, 21:41
the sky sports commentaries also seem to have a bad sound mix..........
re....... two commentators ( one too many) and the sound of the crowd seem to be poorly balanced.
the commentators (who always seem to be chatting to themselves...... like those annoying people in the cinema) just seem to blend in with the crowd.

macrae
21st February 2008, 22:08
I`m Only Deaf In One Ear,
But I Unfortunately Cant Hear With The Other .,,,,(Jester)

freddythefrog
21st February 2008, 22:33
were we supposed to listen to morse code???
nobody told me!!.
I knew i had gone wrong somewhere.
Never knew what captain was talking about when he said "are we on the traffic list sparks??" hee -hee

sparkie2182
21st February 2008, 22:47
a bit of a technicality froggy.............:)

trotterdotpom
21st February 2008, 23:59
When the doctor suggested a cochlear implant, I thought "You beauty," but he went and put it in my ear!

John T.

Tai Pan
2nd March 2008, 11:15
Why is the music so loud, if the tv is set for conversation, the background music is twice the strength, especially on ads. stupid sound engineers.

K urgess
2nd March 2008, 15:07
The programmes are so boring, John, that the adverts are inserted at double volume to wake you up.[=P]
So that you don't miss the latest ex-household name extolling the virtues of funeral assurance. (Sad)

geobro
28th March 2008, 00:02
Are the advertisments deliberately louder than the program ? No, say the TV stations. It only appears that way because we alter the audio frequency. (They are not supposed to bump up the sig strength.)

Re morse and deafness. Well I was significantly deaf in one ear when I started.
But I remember On Cilicia in 1944 Chief and 2nd Sparks were striving to take down an important message under dreadful QSO/QRN (hope got them right!). 2nd was obviously struggling. Chief writing freely and smoking a cig in his elegant Rooseveldt type holder. At conclusion 2nd looked at Chief in amazement, "How did you manage to receive that?" "Eh?" responded the Chief!

Mick farmer
29th March 2008, 18:03
I remember in the sixties that one (or two) of the lecturers at Norwood Tech
got an MBE for research into this problem it could have been Mr Mayo
but the memory is fading

Mimcoman
25th May 2008, 07:15
Hi Dave,

I sailed with No. 7 in 1974 - they could pack a punch! I could actually stop the ship when transmitting on 6Mhz.

Regards,

Steve.
(Thumb)

Hello, dave:

Long time no see (or hear) - or Mike either. I took the Wayfarer out - can't remember the Conqueror's number, but I had to write a special report on it because it had been hand-assembled. I had a lot of trouble with the shorting link that went across the MF coil when you went on HF - a washer had been left out and it could jam before I sussed it out. These Conquerors were 1.8kW; the later ones (Strategist and Specialist and the container vessels) were 1.5kW.

I too have had cancer trouble - wonder if we should start a list? Nah - too late.

Brgds
Bill Smith

charles henry
25th May 2008, 14:42
Not deaf from Morse Code here, but a bit dotty.



Sorry.
Time to dash off.



Why are you dishing out this Pun Ishment
de charles henry(Pint)

tunatownshipwreck
25th May 2008, 20:06
Why are you dishing out this Pun Ishment
de charles henry(Pint)

Humor will CQ. (==D)

73's.

Shipbuilder
25th May 2008, 20:31
I certainly didn't go deaf although was R/O at sea between early 1961 & late 1992. I did develope tinnitus a few years ago, but although at times it can be quite loud, it doesn't seem to impair my hearing in any way (as I can "listen through"). Neither does it cause me the slightest aggravation or irritation. Sometimes it will stop suddenly or start suddenly, but as I say - doesn't bother me a bit. Funny thing though, it invariably stops altogether when we attend the Wray Castle reunions every two years & does not return until we get home! Maybe it is something to do with your QTH rather than the mind. Reunions at Ambleside, Lake District, but live in Preston, Lancs!
Bob

Dave Woods
25th May 2008, 20:57
Hello, dave:

Long time no see (or hear) - or Mike either. I took the Wayfarer out - can't remember the Conqueror's number, but I had to write a special report on it because it had been hand-assembled. I had a lot of trouble with the shorting link that went across the MF coil when you went on HF - a washer had been left out and it could jam before I sussed it out. These Conquerors were 1.8kW; the later ones (Strategist and Specialist and the container vessels) were 1.5kW.

I too have had cancer trouble - wonder if we should start a list? Nah - too late.

Brgds
Bill Smith

Bill, Long time no see, 1973 if the grey matter is still working correctly! If I remember correctly the Conqueror on the Wayfarer was either 3 or 5, I do remember that the Wanderer was numbered below perhaps as low as 2.
The one on the Wanderer blew up on me, (Maiden voyage going through the Med and could not get a spare to Gibraltar in time, so went across the pond on the Emergency Tx ) the big green resistors on the left hand panel got rather hot. MIMCO eventually found that there was something wrong in the synthesiser.

Best regards

Dave Woods

Tai Pan
26th May 2008, 10:33
being hard of hearing has its advantages, especially when moans from the kitchen about how next doors garden looks better.

charles henry
27th May 2008, 19:11
Kris,

I agree with you about that - it is very annoying indeed.

I have got into the habit of pressing the MUTE button on the remote as soon as the adverts come on. Works a treat and the stupid adverts look even more stupid without the sound (if that were possible). Ideally I would like a telly that switched the sound off automatically when the adverts start.

Brian
Unfortunately there is nothing in the make up of either the video or sound carrier of a TV signal that differentiates or warns of commercials as opposed to the standard signal. If there was, we would have had automating muting years ago. it is an imperfect world de chas henry (Pint)