'Diomed'- Middies Work Routine

Sow-Sow-La
15th March 2007, 18:59
Working Routine for the Blue Funnel Line Cadet ship – ‘M.V. Diomed’
1956 to 1963

The ship is manned by 22 Midshipmen, made up of 11 ‘seniors’ and 11 'juniors'. A ‘senior’ being one who has already made a voyage in the ship, and a ‘junior’ making his first voyage in the ship.

The amount of ‘sea time’ that each boy may have, has nothing to do with his status in this ship. In other words, if he has done one voyage in the ship he is a senior, if he has not done a voyage in the ship he is a junior, irrespective of how much sea time he already has in.

Of the senior 11, two are always the Bosun's Mate and Lamptrimmer. Another two are the 5th and 6th Mates, this is to say they work with the 2nd and 3rd Mates at sea and in port doing all the duties that those two officers do and taking their meals in the Saloon with these officers. The 5th and 6th Mates change each week. Of the remaining seniors - three are on watch and four are ‘daymen’.

Of the junior eleven - there are two in each watch, - three ‘daymen’, an ‘Accommodation Peggy’ and a ‘Mess Peggy’. Of the latter two, the ‘Accommodation Peggy’ works in the accommodation until 10am each day and then joins the ‘daymen’. The ‘Mess Peggy’ does no other job other than the Messroom.

When entering and leaving port the Bosun's Mate goes forward and the Lamptrimmer aft. The watch on deck supply men for the wheel, gangway and lookout. The last watch on ‘standby’ tend the forward springs. The next watch on ‘standby’ tend the after springs. Of the daymen, two seniors and two juniors go forward, two seniors and two juniors go aft, leaving the ‘Mess Peggy’ to ‘standby’ down in the Engine Room.

In port when the ship is working cargo there are at least five men aboard at all times. Either the 5th or 6th Mate, the gangwayman, and a derrick gang of three (one senior and two juniors). With the exception of the two leading hands all duties are changed once a week – i.e. on Sunday.

In addition to the 5th and 6th Mates who always dine in the Saloon, the two juniors of the 8 - 12 watch always have dinner in the Saloon at sea, thus ensuring that all midshipmen dine with the officers from time to time.

The new Bosun's Mate arid Lamptrimmer for the next voyage are selected at Singapore homeward. For two weeks, (usually between Port Swettenham and Colombo) these two leading hands assume control for a trial fortnight. This has been found to be a great help when they take up their new duties the next voyage. When the two newly selected leading hands take over, the two old ones become 5th and 6th Mates thus getting in their ‘Bridge Time’. At the and of the trial fortnight the old leading hands revert but the two newly selected ones, although not in charge, shadow their seniors and remain on day work for the remainder of the voyage.

On arrival at the first U. K. port. as a rule all midshipmen proceed on leave. For coasting around the U.K. ports, is left to the old senior and the new Junior eleven, thus leaving the old junior eleven (or as they are now, the new senior eleven), time to get in their leave.

It is clearly understood that if a Bosun’s Mate or Lamptrimmer proves unsatisfactory he can be disrated and replaced. This has occurred in the past.

A Landing Book is supplied and should be filled in by all midshipmen going ashore and also when they return to the ship. Similarly there is a Sailing Book to be filled up each time a dinghy is taken away. The Standing Orders concerning shore leave and sailing are contained in these books.

If a midshipmen wishes to change his watch he must first get permission from the Chief Officer.

Trader
17th July 2007, 00:58
Sow Sow La,

many thanks for that routine. I must pass it on to an old shipmate of mine, Charlie Nelson, who was on the "Diomed" when she first came out. He is with out a computer at the moment.


Trader.

Tai Pan
24th July 2007, 11:24
I sailed on Calchas when she was the middy ship. pain in the backside, worst voyages ever.

demodocus
30th October 2007, 02:18
I did the "Diomed" routine for a couple of voyages 1960/61.

The problem was that in subsequent ships if the Mate found out you were ex Diomed then he'd work the middies as though they were part of the crowd, but as a separate deck gang.

If you wanted bridge watchkeeping experience then you were "permitted" to do the 12 - 4 night watch, morning sights, and evening stars as well as 8 daylight hours on deck.

After this happening on both Antenor and Laomedon I denied ever having heard of a ship called Diomed on later voyages.

Orestes
12th November 2007, 01:17
I also sailed with Charlie Nelson on the Diomed, and was in touch with him until a couple of years ago, when my PXC crashed and I lost all my data. I would like to get in touch with him again, do you have his e-mail address?

Jim Quinn

Trader
12th November 2007, 21:03
I also sailed with Charlie Nelson on the Diomed, and was in touch with him until a couple of years ago, when my PXC crashed and I lost all my data. I would like to get in touch with him again, do you have his e-mail address?

Jim Quinn

Hi Jim, I will pass your message on to Charlie. He sometimes looks in on this site.

Trader

Bill Davies
12th November 2007, 21:47
Trader,

Does the name Charley Saynor ring any bells. He was Lampy in 'the China' with me. I am asking as he was a Welshman living in Salfard (I think). As to be expected he was an excellent seaman.

Brgds

Bill

Orestes
12th November 2007, 22:25
thanks very much for the message re Charlie Nelson, much appreciated
JIm

Orestes
12th November 2007, 22:30
I sailed with Jim Foley on the Nestor, Machaon, Orestes, and the Ajax. he went on to become master in a Singapore company. He was sailing up and down the Barrier Reef on a FOC called the Java Sea.We had lost touch, and here we were passing each other in the Reef and didnt know it. I visited him in Irby on a trup to UK in 98.
If any one here knew Jim ,he unfortunately passed away in 99. He was ill when I visited him, but there were no visible signs,as we had a few pints together.

Trader
14th November 2007, 16:49
Trader,

Does the name Charley Saynor ring any bells. He was Lampy in 'the China' with me. I am asking as he was a Welshman living in Salfard (I think). As to be expected he was an excellent seaman.

Brgds

Bill

Hi Bill,
I did several trips with Charley on the Bellerophon between 1952/54. A nearly all Welsh deck crew (6 Jones's) apart from me and a few Scousers. He was a good hand.

I bumped into him years later in a pub in Manchester,(my home town) he was with another Blue Flue AB. George Green, also from Manchester. I think that they were sailing together on the Pyrrhus at the time. I think that Charley married a Manchester girl.

Trader.