BP Tanker Company Ex-Seagoing personnel

Graham Wallace
16th March 2007, 23:55
I was a 1955 intake “BP Marine Engineering Apprentice”, I have been running a website with that title (in the plural) for about 7 years. I originally started it for two reasons, firstly to find information about the British Crown disaster in August 1966 and secondly to search for and make a database of all ex-engineering apprentices (named Engineering Cadets in 1965) from 1952 onwards. This list is now over 2100 names, 300 of whom I have located and have a little information on each of the remaining 1900. I send a copy of this list to each new apprentice contact I make. I am continually searching for new apprentice/cadet contacts.

About 5 years ago I expanded the database to include all departments and now have a total listing of almost 500 personnel sailing on 315 different BP tankers. (The basic information I require is vessel, rank/rating and joining/leaving dates). Once I get this information I will send you an updated copy

There are many here at SN who already know me and the website, I am always interested in any new contacts, friends of friends as long as ex BP. Any information I receive other than BP sea time is kept confidential and I have been occasionally successful in reconnecting old friends.

BP have never been able to help due to a variety of reasons. The ‘Alternative Marine Engineering Apprenticeship scheme’ only started in 1952 but it seems there are no official records remaining for any of those last 55 years, which is a pity. Over the years I have gained a full intake complement for 1952/59 and 1964 and numerous more individuals in other years up to one person in 1993, even D.G.Alcock’s son! (Though not located him, but still hoping). Some of you might remember Don Bootle?

I have been collecting copies/originals of Dry dock lists, Ships Movements, Apprentices Newsletters (Navigating & Engineering), Fleet News, “The British Tankers” book, editions of 1995 and 2005. I also have sources for other dates of Ships Movements lists; these lists have proven helpful to others at times. If you have retained any please send me a copy. In 2002 I found in a UK used bookstore a copy of the ‘Institute of Marine Engineers Centenary Handbook 1989’ which has been invaluable. I have a number of ships photos but really leave that to others.

If you are interested send me an email.

Graham Wallace

janathull
19th March 2007, 15:55
I started out as a deckboy with B.P. on the Judge. I was in the Statesman when she had the collision and a few others, good firm.

jim brindley
28th March 2007, 11:03
was on british promise 1946 went abadan aden then to freemantle .food awfull talk of a few juming .chief steward said food would be better now fed us steak eggs .when left it was back to crap again

John_F
28th March 2007, 12:11
I started out as a deckboy with B.P. on the Judge. I was in the Statesman when she had the collision and a few others, good firm.
Janathull,
What was the story of the Statesman's collision? Can you give me any details?
Kind regards,
John F.

gdynia
28th March 2007, 13:17
John
The Statesman had 2 collisions as I recall as follows

British Statesman
Shell plating of one tank buckled and tank leaking. Shell plating of poop for about 80 feet buckled, leak kept under control by pumping water from tank bottom.
Cause of collision
San Cirilo is of the opinion that British Statesman was off her course and not keeping a proper lookout, as she was abaft San Cirilo's beam. San Cirilo hoisted N.U.C. lights after collision to warn next astern.
British Statesman thinks the San Cirilo came across from her starboard side and considers that her showing N.U.C. lights after collision is a confession of guilt.
It is probable that both ships were steering slightly converging courses - wind and sea on beam made steering difficult, both H.M. Ships, King George V and California were in difficulties that night from steering trouble.
I would assess blame equally. The night was dark, but not excessively so, except during rain squalls. It was during one of these squalls that I had switched on a shaded stern light. San Cirilo had followed motions and was burning a shaded stern light at time of collision."

Reginald A. Fessenden 24.10.63 Damaged in collision with BRITISH STATESMAN near Lisbon. Towed to Lisbon but CTL.

janathull
28th March 2007, 14:45
The collision I am on about happened in Dec 69. We had arrived off Flushing fully loaded and went to anchor. There was thick fog at the time and the pilot decided to anchor us in deeper water, we came astern for 11 mins and smacked into the Indian bulkie Abkar Jayanti which holed her from no5 into her accommodation and knocked a lovely big hole in our stern, There wasnt much left aft of the F.D. fans. It all got a bit confusing after that, a Jap cargo boat hit us about 9 port, another lovely hole in us, went astern came ahead and demolished the boat deck, we swung around hit the flattie Shoram and recieved a hole in 2 stb for our trouble. Somewhere while things were rapidly going down the pan a Phillipino cargo boat drifted past us with a nice fat hole in her, god knows who did that but it wasnt us,there was also a Russian tanker with a hole in her. It was quite an interesting time and got us all home for christmas.Happy days, janathull.

John_F
28th March 2007, 15:18
Nev & Janathull,
Many thanks for that info - she seemed to have been quite accident prone. Where did the collision with the San Cirilo happen Nev?
I remember being in a similar position as the incident with the San Cirilo when I was Uncert. 3/0 on the Clyde Guardian. Motoring down the Red Sea there was a vessel very slightly abaft our starboad beam when I came on watch at 08.00. By 10.00 she was exactly abeam but much closer. Was she overtaking or should she be regarded as a crossing vessel? By 11.00 I chickened out & put the wheel hard over to port & did a full circle until I came up on her starboard side to resume our normal course. This must have coincided with the Old Man getting up from his desk to open the gin bottle & having a look out of the window to see the horizon spinning round at an alarming rate. I think he nearly had had a heart attack by the time he reached the bridge.
He did accept my explanation & that rather than slow the engine down & let the other vessel pass ahead of us, it was easier all round to take the action I did. It was one of those grey areas in deciding which rule applies.
Kind regards,
John.

gdynia
28th March 2007, 15:19
John
It was in the North Atlantic

janathull
29th March 2007, 07:16
Just to add to the Statesmans collision, I have had time to think about it and after we hit the Indian we came away from her and the Phillipino hit her entering through no5 and coming to rest against the accomodation. I still dont know who banged a hole in the side of the Philipino. There was only two casualtys, two indians jumped over the side of the bulk carrier andwere later picked up cold but O.K. I wouldnt fancy jumping into the water at Flushing in the winter. Regards janathull

luigi
14th April 2007, 08:11
Nev & Janathull,
Many thanks for that info - she seemed to have been quite accident prone. Where did the collision with the San Cirilo happen Nev?
I remember being in a similar position as the incident with the San Cirilo when I was Uncert. 3/0 on the Clyde Guardian. Motoring down the Red Sea there was a vessel very slightly abaft our starboad beam when I came on watch at 08.00. By 10.00 she was exactly abeam but much closer. Was she overtaking or should she be regarded as a crossing vessel? By 11.00 I chickened out & put the wheel hard over to port & did a full circle until I came up on her starboard side to resume our normal course. This must have coincided with the Old Man getting up from his desk to open the gin bottle & having a look out of the window to see the horizon spinning round at an alarming rate. I think he nearly had had a heart attack by the time he reached the bridge.
He did accept my explanation & that rather than slow the engine down & let the other vessel pass ahead of us, it was easier all round to take the action I did. It was one of those grey areas in deciding which rule applies.
Kind regards,
John.


John, Interesting bit about "rather than slow the engine down" - was this an aversion particular to BP do you think? I can remember many occasions in my early days as 3rd/2nd Mate in BP where slowing down would have got me out of a sticky situation, but instead ended up making major course alterations for exactly the same reason as you.

Regards,

Paul.

John_F
14th April 2007, 11:41
Paul,
Welcome to the site.
As you say, reducing engine revs could get you out of tricky situations. Yes - I would say that it was a BP aversion. It seemed that once "Full Away" had been rung, slowing down the engine was an absolute last resort & this seemed to have been inbred in me on all vessels right from when I first started as an apprentice. Not being an engineer I'm not sure what was involved in reducing the engine revs but I was always led to believe, rightly or wrongly, that it involved the engineers in a great deal of extra work.
Kind regards,
John.

James_C
14th April 2007, 12:41
John,
Such an attitude is still prevalent today, with slowing down being a definite taboo, perhaps even more so in these days of 'must be maintained' Charter Speeds etc.
On some of the 70s/80s built ships (steam and diesel), if you pulled the stick back (bridge control) without giving the Engineers at least an hours notice and calling the Old Man, it normally meant the Engine would stop and the ship black out...
On the newer ships (still slow speed diesels of course), pulling her back will cause an awful lot of alarms and produce some abusive phone calls from the Engine Room, but she will keep going. Modern day non watchkeeping engineers don't like having their bar/Movie/sleep time disturbed by work related issues you see.
Thankfully, I'm now on ships which have CPP, so the Engines are at the disposal of the OOW 24/7. Very handy when you're cantering up Malacca, Hormuz or the Channel.
It did take me a little while to get out of the old mindset though!

John_F
14th April 2007, 22:20
Jim,
Interesting.......Glad to know that it wasn't just me who thought that way. I wonder how BP would have fared in a Court of law following a collision if this philosophy had ever come out?
Incidentally, what's CPP - sorry to be so ignorant but some of us 50s & 60s sailors are not too familiar with current nomenclature!
What type of vessel are you on these days?
Kind regards,
John.

Steve Hodges
14th April 2007, 23:14
Paul,
Welcome to the site.
As you say, reducing engine revs could get you out of tricky situations. Yes - I would say that it was a BP aversion. It seemed that once "Full Away" had been rung, slowing down the engine was an absolute last resort & this seemed to have been inbred in me on all vessels right from when I first started as an apprentice. Not being an engineer I'm not sure what was involved in reducing the engine revs but I was always led to believe, rightly or wrongly, that it involved the engineers in a great deal of extra work.
Kind regards,
John.

John,
I don't know if it was the same on all the VLCC steamers, but on the P-class, once you were FAOP you changed over from the main condenser circulating pump to what was called "the scoop". This was an inlet on one side of the hull and outlet on the other, and the ship's speed through the water sent cooling water through the condenser without using a pump. If you slowed down with the engine room unmanned, the condenser could overheat , lose vacuum and trip the turbines. Same thing happened if you made a sharp turn. I can recall being roused from my scratcher at dawn by the duty engineer's cabin alarm, to find all hell breaking out below, the mate having had to take severe measures to avoid one of our wandering flag-of-convenience brethren.
Best regards
Steve

James_C
15th April 2007, 17:05
John,
CPP stands for Controllable Pitch Propellers. What I'm on at the moment is twin screw, both medium speed diesels whirling round at a constant 500 rpm (or thereabouts). To alter speed/direction a hydraulic pump alters the pitch of the blades to suit your requirements.
Sailing with Foreland Shipping at the mo, a consortium of Bibbys/Andrew Weirs/Houlders/James Fishers, which run 6 ships for the MoD Strategic Sealift people. All interesting stuff carting the army around carrying Container/General and Ro-Ro cargo. London registered ships with all British crews, as due to the nature of the work the posts are 'reserved'. Bit different from a tanker!

Steve,
Now you mention it I do recall the scoop. I think the R class had them (steamers) and also the S class, which although diesels, had two massive boilers for the auxiliaries etc. Bit of an odd set up it has to be said.

Indie Boy
10th May 2007, 15:59
John, Interesting bit about "rather than slow the engine down" - was this an aversion particular to BP do you think? I can remember many occasions in my early days as 3rd/2nd Mate in BP where slowing down would have got me out of a sticky situation, but instead ended up making major course alterations for exactly the same reason as you.

Regards,

Paul.

This is almost like being back at sea!
Back in 1972, after an absence of 14 years, I was Third Mate on the British Mallard. One night, on the 12-4, (I was 2nd of 3 watchkeepers) during thick fog in the North Sea, I decided that it would be prudent to slow down in order to avoid a close quarter situation with another vessel that I was watching on the True Motion radar. After a while the 'Old Man' wandered out from the chart Room, and said," we don't do that anymore, it upsets the engineers, you'd be better off making a big alteration in course". Who was I to argue? Bear in mind that the Engine room was on Standby and fully manned. Incidentally, I possessed an OND in Mechanical Engineering, which was more than the 3rd Engineer had! Much to his annoyance.

HENNEGANOL
18th May 2007, 23:10
Indie Boy,

Quote "Incidentally, I possessed an OND in Mechanical Engineering, which was more than the 3rd Engineer had! Much to his annoyance". What were you doing back at sea as a 3rd Mate?

Didn't anyone tell you that Mechanical Engineering is only a very small part of Marine Engineering? Many of the "Professional 3/E's" had no qualifications at all, but by the same token they were Marine Engineers through and through and as an ex. Chief I'm not ashamed to admit that I learned a great deal from them as I progressed through the ranks and after wards. In fact I would have given my right arm if I had been able to employ some of them when I worked offshore.

At the age of 26, I was first trip 2/E on the British Commerce, Marmaduke Walton (he of the cloth cap), aged 52, was 3/E having spent over thirty years at sea, as against my six years. Obviously there was a certain amount of resentment, both from him, the Chief and the Lecky at this upstart!

Over the years the one thing that I have learnt is every man to his own, if one of my Indian/Phillipino/you name it, Fitters came up to me, when we had problems I would always listen to them and if what they said made sense, I would give it a try. Qualifications without hands on experience counts for nothing, which is why this country is in the state it is, because we have too many " Educated Fools" full of theory and no practice!

The point I am making is, do not condemm or mock people because ot their lack of qualifications, because when the chips are down it is hard won experience which counts.

Gerry.

Hague
18th May 2007, 23:36
John,
I don't know if it was the same on all the VLCC steamers, but on the P-class, once you were FAOP you changed over from the main condenser circulating pump to what was called "the scoop". This was an inlet on one side of the hull and outlet on the other, and the ship's speed through the water sent cooling water through the condenser without using a pump. If you slowed down with the engine room unmanned, the condenser could overheat , lose vacuum and trip the turbines. Same thing happened if you made a sharp turn. I can recall being roused from my scratcher at dawn by the duty engineer's cabin alarm, to find all hell breaking out below, the mate having had to take severe measures to avoid one of our wandering flag-of-convenience brethren.
Best regards
Steve

Steve,

Ref: avoid one of our wandering flag-of-convenience brethren
I assume you are referring to the brethren sailing under the Red Ensign.

twogrumpy
19th May 2007, 21:11
There was a story going around that a recently joined 3/O swung the telegraph at noon as used to be the custom in those long gone days.
This would not normally have been problem, however, the ship he had just joined had bridge control.
The story goes that there were strange noises from the engine room, not sure if this was the engine or the engineers..
How true??
twogrumpy

Fraserbetts
20th May 2007, 08:19
There was a story going around that a recently joined 3/O swung the telegraph at noon as used to be the custom in those long gone days.
This would not normally have been problem, however, the ship he had just joined had bridge control.
The story goes that there were strange noises from the engine room, not sure if this was the engine or the engineers..
How true??
twogrumpy

talking of swinging the telegraph, has anyone any details of one of the Irano/British River class alongside at Bandar Mashar, I believe someone decided to show a visitor how the bridge telegraph worked, unfortunately it was all hooked up and she surged ahead alongside the jetty ripping the hose off and badly damaging the accom, lifeboats etc etc. I also believe it was during the Iran/Iraq war when there were only Iranians on board; at that time, the brits were taken off mid Gulf and the ships were taken into Iran by all Iranian crews then handed back on the way South.

Duncan112
20th May 2007, 20:45
talking of swinging the telegraph, has anyone any details of one of the Irano/British River class alongside at Bandar Mashar, I believe someone decided to show a visitor how the bridge telegraph worked, unfortunately it was all hooked up and she surged ahead alongside the jetty ripping the hose off and badly damaging the accom, lifeboats etc etc. I also believe it was during the Iran/Iraq war when there were only Iranians on board; at that time, the brits were taken off mid Gulf and the ships were taken into Iran by all Iranian crews then handed back on the way South.

I was Engineer Cadet on "British Respect" 1983 and we recieved a telex about a similar incident on one of the R class involving the autospin malfunctioning and giving revs for slow ahead with the above results. Upshot was that autospin was not to be used alongside. One of the P's lost its turning gear with a similar mishap.

Just seen Twoogrumpy's photo of the Tridents Gearing and read that she was the ship with the T/G mishap - apologies for that.

Broady
21st May 2007, 09:48
talking of swinging the telegraph, has anyone any details of one of the Irano/British River class alongside at Bandar Mashar, I believe someone decided to show a visitor how the bridge telegraph worked, unfortunately it was all hooked up and she surged ahead alongside the jetty ripping the hose off and badly damaging the accom, lifeboats etc etc. I also believe it was during the Iran/Iraq war when there were only Iranians on board; at that time, the brits were taken off mid Gulf and the ships were taken into Iran by all Iranian crews then handed back on the way South.

I was on the Minab during the first Gulf war and we were not relieved before going into the so called war zone.We were under blackout during the night and the ships name was painted out for obvious reasons,it was a long 4 months but the pay was nice(Thumb)

connie
21st May 2007, 16:42
I was on the Minab during the first Gulf war and we were not relieved before going into the so called war zone.We were under blackout during the night and the ships name was painted out for obvious reasons,it was a long 4 months but the pay was nice(Thumb)

hi i was on the marun with iranian crew who insisted on sleeping in the life boats on the run up to bandarshah? THE PAY WAS GOOD £65 a day war bonus minimum payment £325 i still have my old pay slips, as an aside to this thread does any one know the original river boat names of the marun, minab, and i think the mokran??
regards connie(my pet dogs name,not mine!!)lol.

gadgee
21st May 2007, 17:04
Connie

Marun ex British Severn
Minab ex British Fal
Mokran ex British Neath

All renamed in 1976.

twogrumpy
21st May 2007, 20:11
Duncan
Never saw autospin left operating while on the berth, surely as soon as FWE, the turning gear would go in.
Did not know the full story behind the Trident incdent only saw the resulting damage, story was that somehow the engineer on watch put steam on the turbine while the gear was in, which sounds like a hickup with the interlocks.

Regarding the scoop system, on the R boats I seem to recall this was on auto. control, so that if for whatever reason speed fell below a certain level the main circ. would start and the scoop would shut down, thus maintaining the plant.
As all this was nearly 30 years ago, please correct me if I have got it wrong......
twogrumpy
PS Like the one about the Iranian opearing the telegraph while on the berth, how cool is that.

Duncan112
21st May 2007, 20:36
Just looked at some scribbled notes in my cadet correspondence course - the explanation I was given by the 2/E for the turning gear mishap was that FWE the practise was to shut the bulkhead stops then use the emergency manoeuvring valve to drain the steam from the line between the bulkhead stops and manoeuvring valve. The steam line drains would then be opened and the turning gear engaged. On this occasion there was a breakdown in communications and the turning gear engaged before the emergency manoeuvring valve was operated. Certainly on the "British Respect" (admittedly an oddball as Kawasaki built) there were no interlocks on the turning gear to prevent the emergency manoeuvring gear being used - they were only active on the main control systems.

As Twogrumpy says my experience also was that autospin was only used at anchor and turning gear used alongside but this was after the telex. Is it possible that there was the traditional confusion over sailing time and the engines were warmed through too soon?

Cheers,

Duncan

connie
22nd May 2007, 23:27
Connie

Marun ex British Severn
Minab ex British Fal
Mokran ex British Neath

All renamed in 1976.

thanks for the info paul, whilst serving on the marun whilst in lavan island ,the old man willie burns was taken ashore for questioning by the authorities as some one had reported him for taken photograhs of their navy.
in reality both him and the mate were using binoculars to check the forward mooring ropes. they later came onboard and confiscated the film out of our cameras, i was more wary of the iranians than the iraqies
regards con.

Franrob
8th June 2007, 16:06
I would like to contact people who were on these ships
San Fortunato 30th December 1958 to the 24th March 1959
San Wilfrido 14th April 1959 – 25th May 1959
San Eliseo 24th June 1959 to 23rd December 1959
San Gaspar 29th April 1960 – 8th June 1960 and 9th June 1960
to 30th September 1960

I wondered if anyone here could help.
Please send me a PM

Vital Sparks
21st September 2007, 13:20
Bandar Mashar, I think you mean Bandar Khomeni, wash your mouth out with soap. [=D]

Bill Neale
21st September 2007, 18:17
Indie Boy,

Quote "At the age of 26, I was first trip 2/E on the British Commerce, Marmaduke Walton (he of the cloth cap), aged 52, was 3/E having spent over thirty years at sea, as against my six years.
Gerry.

Marmaduke Walton, the Duke, what a character he was, regaled me of his life experiences during the night hours of the 12-4. I was his J/E on the Liberty in 1970. He broke his ankle but still did his watches prior to paying-off in, I think, Little Aden.

Indie Boy
30th September 2007, 18:47
Indie Boy,

Quote "Incidentally, I possessed an OND in Mechanical Engineering, which was more than the 3rd Engineer had! Much to his annoyance". What were you doing back at sea as a 3rd Mate?

Didn't anyone tell you that Mechanical Engineering is only a very small part of Marine Engineering? Many of the "Professional 3/E's" had no qualifications at all, but by the same token they were Marine Engineers through and through and as an ex. Chief I'm not ashamed to admit that I learned a great deal from them as I progressed through the ranks and after wards. In fact I would have given my right arm if I had been able to employ some of them when I worked offshore.

At the age of 26, I was first trip 2/E on the British Commerce, Marmaduke Walton (he of the cloth cap), aged 52, was 3/E having spent over thirty years at sea, as against my six years. Obviously there was a certain amount of resentment, both from him, the Chief and the Lecky at this upstart!

Over the years the one thing that I have learnt is every man to his own, if one of my Indian/Phillipino/you name it, Fitters came up to me, when we had problems I would always listen to them and if what they said made sense, I would give it a try. Qualifications without hands on experience counts for nothing, which is why this country is in the state it is, because we have too many " Educated Fools" full of theory and no practice!

The point I am making is, do not condemm or mock people because ot their lack of qualifications, because when the chips are down it is hard won experience which counts.

Gerry.
I wasn't mocking, there was no way I could have done his job. Just trying to emphasize the general reluctance to slow down which was prevalent in those days.

Sarky Cut
12th October 2007, 23:31
Nifematic Bridge control.
Failure to understand this system was just not the preserve of Iranian Officers, on the Lagos-Okrica run for several weeks the master was taken ill and the C/O took over. It was on the approach to the jetty that the vessel began to swing to starboad and went "inside the tee.end"
The temporary master instead of pushing the emergency Highland Button marked clearly "Emergency" rang a double ring astern. The Bridge Engine Control attempted to respond but with airstart v/v's banging away but then shut down.
The vessel under the influence of a flooding tide slowly imbedded itself in the jetty and when stopped the bulbous bow rose up under the concrete platform leaving a indentation that some wag during the night christened the "Security Gulch".

Oh what fun we had on that run. Football games against the locals. Soap exchanged for fresh fruit and topend spanners were used in exchange for the local girls favours, alledgedly!
Whilst leaving Lagos the second engineer had been known to stand on the top of the monkey island playing his bagpipes.
The piper was a gentleman of the first order Bill Christie who died of a heart attack many years later.

Sarky Cut
20th October 2007, 18:03
A long long time ago once upon a time in a quaint dockyard/holiday town at the mouth of the River FAL a steam ship was having terrible trouble making water.
The watermaking machinery was there, the steam was there, the vacumn, was there but the Crockatt would not say yes. If I remember they were of Eytie manufacture called SCAMS, well named.
The ship put to sea under the command of Capt (Tinkle)Bell and would steam up and down in an attempt to make more water than was being used. The Eddystone Light was used as a mark as the ship steamed up and down.
All to no avail, during one of the berthing that often took place the telegraph in the engine room burst into flames. The rest of the standby was taken by voice over the Sound Powered phone. Yes you have guessed it, the handle broke on the bridge one.
Anyway to cut a long story short after about six weeks the problem was sorted and we were getting ready to sail. The engines had been warmed through and there was slight delay on getting the pilot or the tug and the turning gear was wound in again and everything was getting ready for the big goodbye.
Bridge rings down to say tugs are arriving and the watchkeeping engineer makes his way to pull out the turning gear, the J/E goes up into the boiler room and the 2/E is up in the LAB doing the boiler tests when like a dervish in a suit the super arrives on the plates and says to me is everything ready, as I strolled over from the switchboard to give him an upto date apprasial of the ongoing situation he opens the ahead valve to spin the engine.
There was a loud shriek from the turning gear as it started to speed up before it disintegrated, this was speedily followed by one aimed at me by the 3/E who had been pulling it out as he passed me to swing the valve shut.
The super just stood there as white as a sheet as his career or lack of it flashed before his eyes.
The ship stayed there for another week whilst this was repaired and I learned a valuable lesson in that it only takes a split second of wrong decision to really give yourself a bad day and that even tingods can make a mistake.

The ship was the British Light the year 1968 the month around August.
A grand bunch of engineers and apprentices on there for that trip.
.

Jim S
20th October 2007, 20:33
Sarkey Cut,
A great story - you painted a word picture that I can visualise

Sarky Cut
21st October 2007, 00:17
Sarkey Cut,
A great story - you painted a word picture that I can visualise

I do tend to go on a bit but things did happen in the engine room it wasn't all confined to 400 word messages and people opening or shutting the wrong cargo v/v's!

Graham Wallace
21st October 2007, 17:39
British Light 1961,anchored at Las Salinas ( lake Maricaibo). I was 4/E on watch alone in E/R, J/E in boiler room and frantic ringing on telegraph to get me to answer 'standyby'. 2/E (red haired 'Big Wullie' Mackenzie I think) due to arrive as other watchkeeper for manoevering but taking his sweet time ( probably still in his cabin).............. Finally 'told' to answer telegraph!

Suddenly realised in confusion that the turning gear was still in.
The Main Engine controls were directly aft above the gearbox. I remember jumping right over the handrails (there is a photo in my website in the British Crown section of that control location) onto the gearcasing and struggling to get that damn great big square block of steel out of engagement.
Delighted to read that someone else totally destroyed that same turning gear years later.
In my time ,January to November 1961 she was not a bad ship but certainly I would not liked to have sailed her in her latter years

Graham Wallace

ChiefCharles
21st October 2007, 22:02
Graham,
As I remember, it was customary at FWE on all the BP steam ships of that era to "lock" the ahead and astern manoeuvering wheels together with a large brass plate with the words "Turning Gear Engaged" printed on it. You and I served on the Light together in 1961 and I cannot remember if that was true of the Light.
Regards - Roger

Sarky Cut
21st October 2007, 22:48
Graham,
As I remember, it was customary at FWE on all the BP steam ships of that era to "lock" the ahead and astern manoeuvering wheels together with a large brass plate with the words "Turning Gear Engaged" printed on it. You and I served on the Light together in 1961 and I cannot remember if that was true of the Light.
Regards - Roger

Just shows that the best laid plans of mice and men go astray when the pressure is on. A lesson to us all that we are not perfect.

I would also direct you to my post where the system was working until some one interferred with the procedure.

Graham Wallace
22nd October 2007, 03:04
Roger , I had forgotten that detail and can no way recollect the plate.
We must have sailed together for some time on her and never shared a watch.
Actually I think that incident took years off my life and there were a few more as well. Bluddy block most probably resulted in my hernia 43 years later.
I disliked that 2/E and I am sure it was mutual. Do you remember G.O.T.B, It started getting chalked on the most unusual places.Thats what I called my horse in horseracing
I have been trying to remember the names of all E/As on her, Have photos of 2 others in E/R but names elude me.
Graham

offcumdum sanddancer
23rd October 2007, 17:35
See a picture of the controls of the Skill with the 'plate' referred to in the link below. It says turning gear out, and as we were full away at the time, that was to be hoped! When turning gear was in it would be as ChiefCharles says, hung between ahead and astern maneuvering valve handwheels.

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/504/medium/8443British_Skill_Me_in_engine_room.jpg

twogrumpy
24th October 2007, 20:53
Interesting perspective here from Sarky regarding engine room life on BP's Italian built ships.

They were a good example of style over substance if ever there was one.

These ships were known throughout the BP fleet as the Ey***s.

Beware Sarky, use of the word Ey***s to describe this class of ship is considered to be non PC , and if you use it you will be classed as a racist by the moderators, and possibly banned from the site. This is the warning I was given, thought I would let you know.

Much look forward to reading more of your comments on life at sea!!

Graham
I also remember the steel bar used to engage the turning gear, support it in the crook of the arm while attempting to slot it home, without falling off the gearcase, happy days.
Six inches square by about eighteen inches long if my memory is correct.

twogrumpy

John Campbell
10th November 2007, 18:38
This may not be the proper thread but here goes.
It may interest BP chaps
Sadly Captain Lewes McKay late Master in B.P. passed away today in Aberdeen. He started his sea going career in(1944) the "British Monarch" - not a BP ship but a Scottish Tramp owned by Raeburn and Verill Glasgow.
He was Marine Supt with Chevron Offshore in Aberdeen for a number of years

John Hunter
12th November 2007, 21:03
Graham,
I came across a ship movement list dated March 14th 1972. If it is of any interest I will try and e-mail a copy. Incudes 107 ships and all crews

John Hunter

paul0510
13th November 2007, 11:25
John,
I'm sure we have either studied or sailed together! And I, too, would love a copy of the movements..probably find me on the Valour for that month.

John Hunter
14th November 2007, 21:19
Paul,
you are correct. You are down as Temp 2/O. The Valour was sailing Kharg to Ravenna and left Kharg on the 13/3. I was 3/O on the Navigator and we arrived Kharg on the 12/3 ............so we must have been at Kharg at the same time. I will send you a copy when I figure out the best way to copy it.....its a bloody strange size so it might be in bits and pieces.

Regards

John Hunter

John Hunter
16th November 2007, 20:10
Paul, can you send me your e-mail address, I dont seem to be able to do an attachment from this page.
John

John Cassels
17th November 2007, 20:16
Anyone know a Jim Little. He was on the same mid - apprentice course
King Ted's 1966.

Graham Wallace
23rd November 2007, 05:36
John,
Computer went on fritz a week ago ,just got a new one up and running in a tentative manner.I would appreciate a copy of the 1972 Ships movements.My email address is as in my profile.
Graham

gary meredith
23rd November 2007, 15:28
My Father Cliff Meredith was an EDH on the British Success, British Duke and British Resource during the 1950's and had many an interesting tale to tell about them all.

luigi
25th December 2007, 16:36
Anyone know a Jim Little. He was on the same mid - apprentice course
King Ted's 1966.

Sailed with Jim Little when he was 2nd Mate and I was 1st Trip Apprentice. Didn't get on unfortunately, but let's be honest it wasn't that unusual for personalities to clash - especially in the confines of a ship (and with a bit of judicious s**t stirring from another apprentice!!!).

Geoff_E
25th December 2007, 20:34
Sailed with Jim Little when he was 2nd Mate and I was 1st Trip Apprentice. Didn't get on unfortunately,

Don't worry, you're not alone!

capnrob
28th February 2008, 22:45
Saw "Tinkle Bell's name in earliier post.
Watchkeeper on " Clyde Corporal " in 1962-63 was occasionally required to head for rainstorms in Indian Ocean, with all tropical deck awnings already rigged.
My job as first-trip Deck Apprentice was to pull out the wooden plug in the middle of the awnings, when Capt Bell needed a fresh water wash-down.
Happy Days.

Allan Gallop
4th December 2008, 22:19
Hi, My name is Allan Gallop, My Dad (Same Name ) was a Bosun on BP ships for meany years, I didnt realy get to know him and now he is dead iv no chance, so if there are any old timers out there who knew him id realy apreciat any information about him you may have, Regards.

chrishandel
5th December 2008, 17:26
The British Statesman must have been jinxked from day one! I joined her when she was loading and the Catering Officers first words to me were that the Captain wanted to know if I drank. The previous R/O has been paid off at RAK. We sailed towards the Cape and were struck by a freak wave in the Mozambique Channel which smashed free both anchors. Dragged them up in the shallows at Durban and the engineering team cut them off with hand hacksaws. Sailed to Milford Haven and had new anchors fitted. Then dumped oil in the water. Sailed to Rotterdam and dumped more oil in the water. Sailed to La Verdon in France and then they found large hole in side of ship. Sailed back out to the Gulf and broke down with salt water in the boiler for 20 odd days in high summer. Sailed for USA and as I was leaving, large bang from engine room and lots of steam from the skylight. 6 Months to treasure forever!

arfabuck
11th December 2008, 20:26
hi i was on the marun with iranian crew who insisted on sleeping in the life boats on the run up to bandarshah? THE PAY WAS GOOD £65 a day war bonus minimum payment £325 i still have my old pay slips, as an aside to this thread does any one know the original river boat names of the marun, minab, and i think the mokran??
regards connie(my pet dogs name,not mine!!)lol.

Wah! How things have changed! We thought we had it good when we got triple pay for being in the war zone, ( Vietnam ) Loading Singapore for .........Mind you as a 4 pound 10 a week apprentice it still did not add up to much.

Art

david freeman
11th December 2008, 20:51
What a pity Oil and water still do not talk, and talk sense. 'Full Away on Passage' to me in my day ment putting the engines up to maximum power, and all the auxilary equipment one could to sleep, for the duration of the voyage. That was an engineers job of work and it was part of The BOT Examination questions, of which there where many.
The deck/Bridge officers duty was to keep a lookout and navigate the vessel in a safe manner? Places like the Channel/ lower north sea, malacca Straits or inter island navigation 'Straights of Messina, the officer of the watch was expected to anticipate ship engine movements, and manouvering tatctics, and as such have informed the master who would issue standing orders for a 'Stand By Engines condition of operation'.
Steam Turbine ships and vessels on Heavy fueled diesel engines either cathedral types or medium speeds, need about an hour to change over to diesel fuels-(operate the engines on naturally apirated cycle) or bring the temperatures of the turbines its steam take offs and boiler superheats into a range where permanent damage is not sustained by the plant, or even more catastrphofic total engine failure under movement conditions. So engineers are not bunk bound or lazy, it just needs a carefull watch by the all seeing and doing deck officer. I thought in your BOT exams you had an engineering paper in which you discussed with the examiner the pro's and con's of a being a good deck officer while in command and on deck watch'.
The engines will respond in an emergency to a stop command, but again as a deck officer have you thought your next move through.
The deck boys above seemed to have a winge, but its not legitimate and it does not embrace you to the oily rags of this world; If you reach the dizzy heights of nautical superintendent of marine operations manger: Think about your cargo and the investment it represents, and then if you dare curse your fellow colleages below decks.
By that was a goody to let go?

stewart4866
12th December 2008, 18:43
Well said david, chaps on the bridge thought standby just happened. stewart

arfabuck
12th December 2008, 22:10
Well said david, chaps on the bridge thought standby just happened. stewart

Branding us all with the same brush?(Thumb)

Whilst FAOP and FWE were log entries for the bridge, my experience with SBE, kicking the motor over on air, pulling the log or any other action requiring hands on activities down below always had a phone call preceding the order where practicable.

Where tight manouvreing was coming up with repeated forward/reverse telegraph orders were the plan, warning was always given beforehand and the chief would advise us well ahead when enough was enough. Not enough air or something. Can't remember that far back.

Maybe it was because as an apprentice I spent time below with scavenge fires etc I don't know, but it appears that you have sailed with some duff top dogs.

Art

winwillblue
2nd January 2009, 20:23
I Was On The British Lady In 1958 As 4th Eng Going Through The Suez Canal South Bound Lead Ship. We Had A Mishap A Junior Broke A Thermometer In The Lube Oil Cooler And Without Telling Anyone He Removed The Thermo Pocket Hence We Lost All The Engine Oil And Held Upthe Whole Convoy. At The Bitter Lakes We Were Placed Last To For The Rest Of The Passage And On Return From Bombay We Were Made To Wait Until Last Again Regards Bill, Other Ships
Crusader-fortune-merchant- Vision-resource. All Good Ships

boilerbill
2nd January 2009, 20:51
I think I sent you one a few days ago, Keith Chesworth and gave original home towns of a couple of my year.

R396040
2nd January 2009, 22:37
I did my second trip to sea on British Might as galley boy joining her in Grangemouth I recall. Two month trip to Persian Gulf as we called it in those days. Abadan was about the only port in those days and at least you had the Seamans club there with big bottles of beer and a movie paid for with little books of prepaid vouchers, no cash accepted. Even though she was a relatively small tanker after loading we needed a top up of cargo supplied over the bar by two ancient funnel admidship tankers the British Soldier & British Sailor,real oldies..... Lands End for orders and we broke down in Bay of Biscay (again). BTC wouldnt send a tug but instead we waited a couple of days drifting till they un drydocked another BTC tanker ,forget name, which towed us into Falmouth where we signed off. After a well earned five days leave the Pool sent me back to Falmouth,being as they put it a tanker man now ! The ship I was to join was the Willowtree/branch ?,something like that,and as I approached her I saw the funnel was on fire and sparks floating into the sky. SHe was also very old,a Newcastle company I recall. Anyway I turned away without boarding and as I walked back up the dock there was the British Might in drydock so went on board for a cuppa. Got offered promotion to A/S so immediately accepted and spent a lovely few weeks in Falmouth followed by seven month trip Persian Gulf/Red Sea ports/ Kiwi.
I wouldnt call them the good old days though,bad feeder,shortage of water a regular occurence so tried my best to avoid the tankers after that. Not always successfully needless to say. Cest la vie....
Stuart Henderson

Hamish Mackintosh
3rd January 2009, 02:13
Much has been said about "Not" stopping the engines, but I have a tail about one that would not stop. On passage from Aruba to Bergen and Oslo aboard the British Splendour, I was second wheel on the twelve to four watch,and prior to going to the wheel had been instructed to "Give the old man a shake" as we were due to pick up the pilot at around three AM, he wandered into the wheelhouse a little after me ,and the pilot boat was hull down on the port bow,after a little while he instructed the second mate to "slow her Down a bit' the second rang for half ahead on the telegraph and the engine room answered, but nothing happened, the throb of the engine remained the same thru the duck board under my feet, so the second mate rang down again this time for slow, again the engineroom answered, and again nothing changed, the old man let out a squawk like a startled chicken ,and swung the telegaph about six times and left it on stop, again the engineroom answered, but again nothing changed, by this time we were close about the pilot boat ,and I could see the cutter in the water close in waiting to run the pilot to our ladder , then the cutter turned tail and made a run back for the pilot boat ,to escape our wake I should imagine, they could see we were not going to stop and didn't want to chance a swamping, the mountains were looming very close up ahead, and I could see the cleft that I took to be the fiord we were to enter, I guess the old man was thinking the same thing, and knew he was running out of time, so he asked the second mate,"we got lots of water here?"yes said the second, then to me "hard a starboard bring her round 180 degrees" and again to the second mate "Phone that gang and find out what they are playing at" keep in mind we were still thundering along at full speed and both telegaphs were on stop, we were shipping quite a bit of the north sea on our after deck too as I recall ,coming round that fast(we had quite a lean on), I was just starting to ease the wheel, the pilot boat was just coming into view off the starboard bow when the second mate got off the phone to the engine room, "They can't stop her"he said ,well I won't repeat what the old man said, but I thought he was about to have a heart attack he was so red in the face, after saying so much without taking a breath, just then the engineroom side of the telegraph rang and the engine stopped, we now had the pilot boat off the starboard bow but were still making way, the old man said "put her full astern, I'll shake some sense into **** *******" well I swear I thought that ship was going to break in half, on the wheel I was jumping up and down ,and I was amidships , it must have been quite a ride back aft, and he kept her going astern untill we were dead stopped,I remember thinking when he said "put her full astern"what if they can't stop her again?I never did find out what the cause was ,as the engineers were very subdued after a meeting in the old mans day room the following morning, and the second mate was a very silent sort of a chap ,we payed off a week or so afterwards in the Tyne. the engine by the way was a Doxford and had not caused a minute of trouble(no breakdowns) the whole trip

Minto
3rd January 2009, 11:13
I first went to sea on the British Mariner 9/12/66 to 23/5/67 as engine room boy. The engineers did not know what to do with me as the scheme was new.
Sailed on a couple of cargo boats & did not enjoy. Joined British Argosy 24/11/67 to 11/4/68 as JOER & was offered a BP contract.Joined British Kiwi 8/5/68 to 26/6/68 again JOER. Joined British Hussar 14/8/68 to 17/2/69. Promoted SOER. Joined British Poplar 30/5/69 to16/7/69. Having married in May 1969 I decided to leave the sea.

Minto
3rd January 2009, 11:31
Just noticed Arfurbuck's mug insignia. I still have mine. Anybody else kept their ironstone mug with houseflag?

eriskay
3rd January 2009, 11:49
Does anyone have any details of the incident in 1964 when M.V. 'British Envoy' ran onto the Avocet Rock, at the Southern end of the Red Sea, whilst outward-bound? I heard she sustained serious bottom damage and had to go back to a drydock (Genoa) for repairs. I believe the rock is named after a ship that struck it in the late part of the 19th century.

David Williams
3rd January 2009, 14:52
Hi Graham.
This may be of interest to you and your B.P. file.
I wasnt in the engine department,but catering,
but I thought that Id add my two pennyworth
anyway.Ships I served on during the 1950s were :-

British Pioneer (later the Clyde Pioneer)
British Resource
British Envoy (later the Clyde Envoy)
British Duke
British Hero.

Apart from the "Duke" they were not bad ships.

All the Best

Dave Williams(R583900)

Graham Wallace
4th January 2009, 03:59
Just noticed Arfurbuck's mug insignia. I still have mine. Anybody else kept their ironstone mug with houseflag?

Yup, But do not have the nerve to use it.

Graham

arfabuck
4th January 2009, 10:53
Yup, But do not have the nerve to use it.

Graham

Go on, don't be shy. You can always have the flag engraved on the mug when it finally washes off. I did. Its a real conversation stopper when you use it amongst land lubbers. They just don't know what to believe when you relate your experiences at sea. Real gullible.

Mind you, that 1/2 pint of coffee tends to have me running for the Khazi sooner rather than later.

Art

Minto
4th January 2009, 11:13
I use mine regularly. Been through dishwasher God knows how many times. Houseflag still as it was. Had to hang on to it when they introduced those horrible melamine ones. Also, untill I found the site, it was a reminder of my youth.

Minto

david freeman
7th January 2009, 20:45
I first went to sea on the British Mariner 9/12/66 to 23/5/67 as engine room boy. The engineers did not know what to do with me as the scheme was new.
Sailed on a couple of cargo boats & did not enjoy. Joined British Argosy 24/11/67 to 11/4/68 as JOER & was offered a BP contract.Joined British Kiwi 8/5/68 to 26/6/68 again JOER. Joined British Hussar 14/8/68 to 17/2/69. Promoted SOER. Joined British Poplar 30/5/69 to16/7/69. Having married in May 1969 I decided to leave the sea.
About this time on White crew and Indian/Parkistan crews BP employed GP Notation. The hiriechy of the engine room was still the Eng cadet through J/E To your tickets and C/E.
With the GP Crew the rating of greaser and fireman, and storekeeper were abolished (But the Donkeyman was kept), and the replacement ratings were JOER and SOER? The Seor was a PO, and lived and messed in the PO's cross alleyway. These ratings were employed basically to take over some of the maintenance duties of the J/E on daywork routines, and help the C/E and pumpman(Who was a PO). The new rating and their personal aspirations had not been thought out as they could not transfer to the Engineer stream career, for reasons of ?Educational qualifications/technical experience of an authorised apprenticeship or other reasons I am not sure about. On White crew life was difficult with this arrangement: But with a Karachi or Bombay crew the PO Fitters as employed with a GP crew on daywork or sometimes watches?) were outcasts both to their native crew members( By social standing/religion/caste, and they did not come under the Sharang's domain?) and the white officers, and all though they were very able persons, they again could not progress to the ranks of engineer, and they felt personally very agrevied, and voyages could be very fraught with the problems of human relationships.
I am not aware for how long these arrangements lasted but were in operation certainly in the late 60's and early 70's.
Maybe some of you who have sailed foreign flag have resolved some of these issues in other ways?

JohnBP
26th March 2009, 19:25
Graham, your site is great and i have been visiting it for a number of years, even before you moved out west. I have a number of names of X BP apprentices thet were in my intake, keep in touch with2 and they do not appear on your list, if you want I can send details for your database.

John

jAdUwallah
29th March 2009, 04:03
I was on the Trident when the turning-gear incident happened. I remember the Chief asking me to test the motor to see if we could still use it, he was joking of course.(Jester)

ernhelenbarrett
29th March 2009, 08:13
Re the ringing of telegraphs, can anyone remember the BP manned tugs up in the Gulf? I believe a double ring on the telegraph meant two cold beers required urgently on the bridge!! I can remember the chimney midship tankers up there when I was on BI's Dara
Ern Barrett

chrisk
15th April 2009, 14:51
Hi minto i was also an erb from 74-75 then joer 75-75 then soer same year then in 76 all changed to gp manning,gp1 76-79,po from 79-84, then transfare offshore thru bp to safe felicia,later to be renamed port regency from 84-95 as mech tech,went to sea with all 11 other erbs together !! can you imagine the mayhem when the crew saw us lot coming aboard!! they also didnt know what to do with us or make of us! had some issues with old timers who believed we were there to take their jobs(especially firemen when we had to do boiler watch) but in general had a great time,we had a professional 3/e who trained us in the main.

Chris Isaac
7th May 2009, 17:00
Did one voyage with BP as 2nd Mate on British Venture in 74.
Never had such a miserable time in all my days at sea.
Up and down the gulf round and round the Cape, never set foot on dry land for 5 months except to read the draft.

beverlonian
9th May 2009, 10:58
Did one voyage with BP as 2nd Mate on British Venture in 74.
Never had such a miserable time in all my days at sea.
Up and down the gulf round and round the Cape, never set foot on dry land for 5 months except to read the draft.


Hi Chris,
I think it was 73 not 74 - I was Junior Engineer whilst you were there. Agreed not the best of ships from an engineer's viewpoint and gulf runs were a bit monotonous. However, with lots of wives on board (including yours and mine, and unusual for the time) we had some good times, and towards the end of my trip we had a few Meddy ports which improved things. Good to see we're both still around. Cheers - Bill Neale.

macca57
10th June 2009, 23:33
John,
CPP stands for Controllable Pitch Propellers. What I'm on at the moment is twin screw, both medium speed diesels whirling round at a constant 500 rpm (or thereabouts). To alter speed/direction a hydraulic pump alters the pitch of the blades to suit your requirements.
Sailing with Foreland Shipping at the mo, a consortium of Bibbys/Andrew Weirs/Houlders/James Fishers, which run 6 ships for the MoD Strategic Sealift people. All interesting stuff carting the army around carrying Container/General and Ro-Ro cargo. London registered ships with all British crews, as due to the nature of the work the posts are 'reserved'. Bit different from a tanker!

Steve,
Now you mention it I do recall the scoop. I think the R class had them (steamers) and also the S class, which although diesels, had two massive boilers for the auxiliaries etc. Bit of an odd set up it has to be said.

In the late sixties and early seventies, steam turbines were driven by the boiler and the exhaust gas from the engine.
Speeds of less than 80 rpm would lead to a reduction in steam thus causing the steam driven alternator to fail, but deckies wouldn't understand these technicalities.

James_C
10th June 2009, 23:56
In the late sixties and early seventies, steam turbines were driven by the boiler and the exhaust gas from the engine.
Speeds of less than 80 rpm would lead to a reduction in steam thus causing the steam driven alternator to fail, but deckies wouldn't understand these technicalities.

macca57,
As far as I can remember the 'S' class of the early 80's (which I was referring to) didn't use any exhaust gas from the M/E for the T/A's. It was mainly a crap design/build which caused all the problems.

eriskay
11th June 2009, 00:41
" In the late sixties and early seventies, steam turbines were driven by the boiler and the exhaust gas from the engine. Speeds of less than 80 rpm would lead to a reduction in steam thus causing the steam driven alternator to fail, but deckies wouldn't understand these technicalities "

Did you mean to say " ...... early seventies, steam alternators were ....." rather than " ..... early seventies, steam turbines were ....." ?

Not familiar with the design you describe, i.e. T/A sets supplied by either steam from boilers or exhaust gas from main engine, and would have thought that the problem you describe would be averted by limiting T/A supply to steam only if the main engine was liable to reduce output and therefore gas supply to T/A.

Think you are getting a little confused, Macca 57, something not quite right or missing in your message, doesn't hang together for me ..... :-)

sam seymour
18th July 2009, 18:18
M V MINAB exBRITISH FAL

Satanic Mechanic
18th July 2009, 19:03
I assume we are talking about motor ships with T/As, in which case the auxiliary boiler would take over producing steam as the exhaust gas boiler steam production started to reduce with engine revs.

Assuming the damn thing flashed up of course, they were usually the object of extreme scrutiny (and occasional verbal encouragement) during the change over period.

Anyhoo something would have to have gone bizarrely wrong for exhaust gas to get into a turbine


James C

The S class did not have a scoop, they are only used on steam ships, but you are right the R class did.

Changes of speed - you should be able to change from full away all the way down to Full ahead with no problems these days, in fact it is one of the tests for UMS certification. I would be wary about doing it on a steam ship though, steam is slow engineering with an awful lot of interactions in the plant, if it gets disturbed from a settled position things can get out of shape big time

Dickyboy
19th July 2009, 19:08
Does anyone recall an air start bottle line blowing on one of the River or Titty boats in the 70s? On the way down from Antwerp I think. One hell of a bang which I heard from the Focs'tle. Within seconds two black balls went up, and we were towed back to Antwerp. Hell of a mess down aft on the lower plates area. Lots of cables cut, but thank god no one was in the area at the time.
I believe at the time the event was put down to traces of oil being in the bottle when the air start was used. Though the engine must have been started before on that day to get as far down the canal? as we did.

Bosun bill
6th August 2009, 18:10
graham wallace
idid my first trip to sea on the RESOLUTION [open focsal] 8 2 52 as deck boy
from Newcastle but was paid off in Bermuda after we called in with boiler troulde on 1 7 52. masg recvied dad had been killed in accdent the british sailor socity in bermuda was very good to me paid my air fare home [still have the ticket]. on RANGER 24/9/54 -14/3/55
bosun bill

Graham Wallace
7th August 2009, 05:34
graham wallace
idid my first trip to sea on the RESOLUTION [open focsal] 8 2 52 as deck boy
from Newcastle but was paid off in Bermuda after we called in with boiler troulde on 1 7 52. masg recvied dad had been killed in accdent the british sailor socity in bermuda was very good to me paid my air fare home [still have the ticket]. on RANGER 24/9/54 -14/3/55
bosun bill

She was an oldie, built 1948 and scrapped at Faslane 1963. I know of a couple of people who sailed her, one here on SN 1962/63 and a 4/E in 1957, both a little after your time.
Graham

thogan
22nd September 2009, 05:12
Does anyone know Clive Wright. He was a Bosun on BP Tankers in the 50,s and 60,s. I am a relation, but I have lost contact. I was at sea on NZ ships in th 60,s Kind regards Terry Hogan

twogrumpy
22nd September 2009, 10:49
Does anyone know Clive Wright. He was a Bosun on BP Tankers in the 50,s and 60,s. I am a relation, but I have lost contact. I was at sea on NZ ships in th 60,s Kind regards Terry Hogan

Is this the C Wright mentioned a number of times on this site famous for his paintings of ships?
(Cloud)

Sarky Cut
22nd September 2009, 11:40
Does anyone recall an air start bottle line blowing on one of the River or Titty boats in the 70s? On the way down from Antwerp I think. One hell of a bang which I heard from the Focs'tle. Within seconds two black balls went up, and we were towed back to Antwerp. Hell of a mess down aft on the lower plates area. Lots of cables cut, but thank god no one was in the area at the time.
I believe at the time the event was put down to traces of oil being in the bottle when the air start was used. Though the engine must have been started before on that day to get as far down the canal? as we did.

Yes, it was at Imuijan (sp) Locks after the MV British Security left an extended DD in Amerstadam due to industrial action in Holland. A National Strike no less.

Oil from the bridge control hydrualic system leaked back into the ME start line.

The ME air pressure was used to maintain the hydraulic pressure and damp out any large changes due to demand during air starts of the engine.

The explosion was caused by a faulty airstart v/v, the "bang" was prevented from entering the airstart bottles when the pressure made a hole like a shell going through steel at the "tee" where the port and starboard bottles joined.

Both air bottles M/Teed through this hole into the engineroom where the pressure was raised considerably to match most of the engineers Blood Pressure.

The blast did very little damage, a few cut cables by the shrapnel from the hole and every floro tube was reduced to dust, NOT GLASS SHARDS, but dust within the area.

The ship was towed back to the yard for a few more days as investigations into the cause took place.

More horrific was the dreaded Lagos/Okrica run that followed :)

Binnacle
22nd September 2009, 12:23
was on british promise 1946 went abadan aden then to freemantle .food awfull talk of a few juming .chief steward said food would be better now fed us steak eggs .when left it was back to crap again

Sailed on British Dragoon 1946/47, similar misery, strictly BOT, "two pot" ship, tin plates, tin mugs. Abadan et al, two trips Haifa, two jaunts Aden, one trip to Melbourne and Genoa, then, Deo Gratias, Grangemouth. Used to think about her when I was studying for second mate's and the consequences of failure. Come the revolution or a ticket !

Dickyboy
27th September 2009, 21:15
Yes, it was at Imuijan (sp) Locks after the MV British Security left an extended DD in Amerstadam due to industrial action in Holland. A National Strike no less.

Oil from the bridge control hydrualic system leaked back into the ME start line.

The ME air pressure was used to maintain the hydraulic pressure and damp out any large changes due to demand during air starts of the engine.

The explosion was caused by a faulty airstart v/v, the "bang" was prevented from entering the airstart bottles when the pressure made a hole like a shell going through steel at the "tee" where the port and starboard bottles joined.

Both air bottles M/Teed through this hole into the engineroom where the pressure was raised considerably to match most of the engineers Blood Pressure.

The blast did very little damage, a few cut cables by the shrapnel from the hole and every floro tube was reduced to dust, NOT GLASS SHARDS, but dust within the area.

The ship was towed back to the yard for a few more days as investigations into the cause took place.

More horrific was the dreaded Lagos/Okrica run that followed :)
I rejoined her (The Security) in Amsterdam 24 Feb 72, having been in her on my previous trip.
That must have been just prior to the event. I recall that the actual Air Start Bottles hadn't blown up, but I thought there was more damage. I was a novice, being a GP1, and like blood, there seemed to be more damage than there actually was. As I recall no one was nearby when it went off thank heaven.
Ah! The Lagos Okrika run, a lot of tedium, with the odd good moment rarely thrown in. Cruises around the Islets and Creeks on the Bonny River in a lifeboat, little runs ashore into Okrika Village via kids in dugouts, football matches at the local grammer school up the pipeline. Even little diversions meant a lot around there didn't they?

Gordon Knight
27th September 2009, 23:07
New member just saying hello. I was a 1958 intake Engineering Apprentice.
Did the college bit at Bolton Tech and the shipyard bit at St Andrews Dock,
Hull. Served on Renown/Flag/Merchant/Signal.

Graham Wallace
28th September 2009, 05:33
New member just saying hello. I was a 1958 intake Engineering Apprentice.
Did the college bit at Bolton Tech and the shipyard bit at St Andrews Dock,
Hull. Served on Renown/Flag/Merchant/Signal.

Hi Gordon,

thanks for the note , I'll contact you direct by SN email

Graham

barnessteve
27th October 2009, 12:45
Hello Graham. I was a Radio Officer "Sparky" with BP from 1974 - 1979. I was 2nd RO on the British Norness for 8 months then on the British Maple. I was also on the Centaur and a couple of others but don't have the names or the dates with me. I'd like to get added to your database and I still have my log showing dates of the ships I was on but it's back home in San Antonio and I'm in Finland and about to get on the the Oasis of the Seas. (Were Putting in a new system and sailing it back to Fort Lauderdale. Not been to sea (working) for 30 years so really looking forward to it).

So in about three weeks I'll send you my full details.

Not been in touch with very many folks from back then but did get an email from a former cadet who left BP joined the Royal Aussie Navy, went on Submarines and is now a Sub base commander in Oz.

Hello everyone. Been reading some of the comments. Very interesting reading. Full agree that experiance counts, I'm 55 and in Wireless Networking Design, the amount of "educated" kids I come across who don't know dick is amazing.

Graham Wallace
27th October 2009, 19:33
Hello Graham. I was a Radio Officer "Sparky" with BP from 1974 - 1979. I was 2nd RO on the British Norness for 8 months then on the British Maple. I was also on the Centaur and a couple of others but don't have the names or the dates with me. I'd like to get added to your database and I still have my log showing dates of the ships I was on but it's back home in San Antonio and I'm in Finland and about to get on the the Oasis of the Seas. (Were Putting in a new system and sailing it back to Fort Lauderdale. Not been to sea (working) for 30 years so really looking forward to it).

So in about three weeks I'll send you my full details.

Not been in touch with very many folks from back then but did get an email from a former cadet who left BP joined the Royal Aussie Navy, went on Submarines and is now a Sub base commander in Oz.

Hello everyone. Been reading some of the comments. Very interesting reading. Full agree that experiance counts, I'm 55 and in Wireless Networking Design, the amount of "educated" kids I come across who don't know dick is amazing.

Hi Steve ,I'll look forward to that.
Graham

tom roberts
29th October 2009, 14:36
Did first trip deepsea on the Brit Supremecy as peggy,the bosun I think was from Cornwall Ithink his name was Fleming the cook was Polish the second cooks name was Mc Cabe? I remember an a.b. Les Jordan the donkeyman was Maltese I think his name was Debono the Capt was C.W.Uridge but my fondest memories of her have just been awakened by a couple of jars of melon jam given to me by my neighbour whos godmother in France made specially for me as on the Supremecy I ate loads of it on the best bread I ever tasted as made by the second cook and baker , on paying off Iwas given a £1 by all the deck and engine ratings all exept one a.b. who would have made Shylock look like a spendthrift I had more in tips than in wages I kept all that money pinned to my vest till I got home to Ruthin and when I put it on the table my mam and dad were blown away to see so much mind you it was a 5 month trip.

tom roberts
29th October 2009, 14:48
Forgot to say in previous comment this trip was in 1954

Graham Wallace
30th October 2009, 00:26
Forgot to say in previous comment this trip was in 1954

Hi Tom,

It was a long time ago but do you remember the approximate months. I know a Navigating Apprentice on her in 1954/55

Graham

tom roberts
12th November 2009, 12:00
Hi Graham, I was on the Supremacy from May to September in 1954,joined her in Birkenhead paid of in Grangemouth as I said I think the skipper was Capt C. W. URIDGE,the chief engineer hit me in the face one afternoon as I had awaken him by banging the watercan I used to take to the deck crew working forward ,it was a cowardly thing to do but I kept it to myself .