Menus

BANKLINEBARRY1966
21st March 2007, 01:25
HI EVERYBODY,

iM LOOKING FOR ANY BANK LINE MENUS BETWEEN 1970 AND 1979 YOUR HELP WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED..

bIG BAZ

Tony Breach
23rd March 2007, 00:59
Hi Big BAZ,

Back in the 60's it was a piece of crumpled paper jammed between the tines of a fork with a load of lies scrawled by hand upon it by the butler. I seem to remember curry & rice thrice daily but no government warning that eating on a Bank boat may be bad for one's health. Beautiful ships though, especially the Harland ones!

Good luck with your search & hope you find a filet steak.
Tony.

kwg
1st April 2007, 12:44
Hi Big BAZ,

Back in the 60's it was a piece of crumpled paper jammed between the tines of a fork with a load of lies scrawled by hand upon it by the butler. I seem to remember curry & rice thrice daily but no government warning that eating on a Bank boat may be bad for one's health. Beautiful ships though, especially the Harland ones!

Good luck with your search & hope you find a filet steak.
Tony.

I don't ever remember seeing a steak, fillet or otherwise. As you say plenty of curry though and 2 eggs on Sundays and Thursdays...WoW....

ruud
1st April 2007, 12:57
I don't ever remember seeing a steak, fillet or otherwise. As you say plenty of curry though and 2 eggs on Sundays and Thursdays...WoW....

Ahoy kwg,
2 eggs, nope buddy, just 1,the other one was used for the cake, only given on Sunday!:sweat:

Duncan112
1st April 2007, 15:54
The thing that used to fascinate me was the chips for breakfast - only ever saw this on a Bank boat (Mind you I did a stint on one channel ferry which shall remain nameless and found breakfast for the passengers being cooked in the deep fat frier sausages, bacon, mushrooms, fried bread, eggs the lot and finished off under the IR lamps)

Question though, what caused the orangy/red grease round the mince in its various incarnations, never been able to replicate that!!

R58484956
1st April 2007, 16:16
Greetings Banklinebarry56 and welcome to the site of SN. Enjoy what you see and join in. Bon voyage.

marine master
1st April 2007, 17:54
At last some home truths about Bank Line! and the food (Food with a question mark) Worst 18 months of my seagoing career. Fortunately great crowd (Apart from the mate) and it was a H&W B&W,

Duncan112
1st April 2007, 18:13
Food was only a small part of the Bank Line experience, taken in the round I wouldn't have swapped my time with them for anything, great crowd, good runs. Really enjoyed the Bhandaris currys too - sorry Marine Master didn't enjoy his time with them.

cadet
1st April 2007, 21:33
Question though, what caused the orangy/red grease round the mince in its various incarnations, never been able to replicate that!!

GHEE.

K urgess
1st April 2007, 22:45
Having spent about a quarter of my 11 years at sea with Bankline I can honestly say I came away with a loathing for curry that took years to grow out of. Colman's curry powder is still banned from our kitchen but the above excludes crew curries for special occasions like Indian Independence Day.
The first trip I remember being famous for a lot of Irish stew. Captain Allen from Ballymena and family.
The second trip I didn't starve and at that time I was built like a racing snake with the appetitie of a rhino. Captain Newton from Richmond. This second trip ran into a third trip with an immediate signing back on in Liverpool.
The fourth trip I remember having cases of tins of baked beans under my bunk, especially the ones with small sausages in and lots of EHT milk. Captain McCaffery who came from somewhere like Lytham St Annes, I think.
I don't remember really bad feeding but then I had spent 7 months with Hungry Hogarth's so Bankline was luxury. I spent 4 Christmasses with them and they all were just normal Christmas dinners.
I seem to remember the bits of scrap paper doing duty for menus but I also remember properly typed ones on Bankline menu cards. Sometimes all three of the day's meals on the same menu with yesterday's on the other side which could get confusing. You could normally tell the day of the week from what was on the menu anyway. Centipede chicken on Sundays. They probably only had 7 menus that were re-used week after week.
Don't you wish you'd paid more attention and maybe grabbed a few when they were thrown away.
Didn't Bankine have a policy of having the menus available for inspection by the super when back in the UK?
Cheers
Kris

trotterdotpom
2nd April 2007, 01:23
I love those beans with the little sausages soaking up the juice - great.

John T.

cboots
2nd April 2007, 03:58
I always thought a Bank Line menu was "take it or leave it". Chips for breakie was also a P & O curio; experienced it when I sailed with Bulk Shipping Division. Not my choice but plenty wolfed 'em down with relish.
CBoots

kwg
2nd April 2007, 09:58
Ahoy kwg,
2 eggs, nope buddy, just 1,the other one was used for the cake, only given on Sunday!:sweat:

Cake!!! don't be silly...they were 'Yorkshire Pud' disguised to look like little cakes....you could play cricket with the things...LOL

Going back to the curry's...I remember that sometimes there was an 'egg curry' on the menu, can't recall what they were called, one consisted of half hard boiled eggs in a curry sauce and the other was full of little omelettes.

From what I can remember...the cold stores, meat etc looked OK when it came on-board, what the galley did with it beggars belief.

marine master
2nd April 2007, 23:03
On he Dartbank. Food was so bad, we called in the British consul in New Orleans (Or one of the gulf ports) to check the 'fridges. They were crawling and the meat was green, The old man (His bond) got wind and emptied the fridges overboard during the night. First job in any port was to find somewhere to eat ashore, and then hit the bars! 2 eggs a week, never saw salad except beetroot and onion. No fresh milk, it was GRIM.

avonbank
4th April 2007, 01:52
Hi everybody, I tend to agree that Bank Line food was take it or leave it.
I took the chips for breakfast because I did not like curries.
Barry you could try contacting Lossiemouth fishing museum as they had a Bank Line corner and may be able to help you. Or try to get hold of a cadets log book as the cadets used to write down the menue when there was nothing much else to write about. cheers,avonbank

JOHNKITTO
4th April 2007, 07:56
The food was fine, the service was questionable. On my first trip in the Pinebank in 1966 we were inthe Red Sea bound for India (where else) and the steward was serving potatoes from a tureen and a bead of sweat ran down his face and dropped into the spuds. As a sixteen year old apprentice the choice was stark. eat or starve. We couldn't wait to get ashore inplaces like the States, Aussie, South Africa to eat. We would even go on board other ships in port and hope we got invited to a meal. We took on stores in Port Swettenham, Malaysia, most of it had been condemned by the Australian Airforce.But how I miss such delights as Camel egg (fried bread with an egg in the middle) I still alive 40 years on so I suppose it could have been worse.

slick
4th April 2007, 10:43
All,
Then there was Hains, Harrisons, and Hogarths!!
Yours aye,
Slick

cboots
4th April 2007, 14:53
Some of the liner companies weren't too hot either. Sight of a PSNC boat still gives me stomach cramps.
CBoots

kwg
4th April 2007, 18:42
On one boat when I was 2nd Mate, down on the stern, late night, early morning docking European ports in mid winter, the old crew's cook would make hot 'Chapati' breads and strong tea for everyone...just the thing when Jack Frost was sub zero.

John Campbell
22nd April 2007, 20:57
One famous Bank Line Master when ordering Apples would always follow the entry in the order form sic Apples(small) so that there were more to the crate or kilo and more to go round at meal times.
I remember being given a severe bollocking by Capt Smith on the Southbank (1953) for leaving a small piece of mouldy cheese on my side plate at lunch. A cretinous "Butler" who hated us apprentices reported me. I can remember him bellowing at me yet. You "army dodger" we cant afford to feed you cheese anymore and your tap is stopped as far as cheese is concerned. I still never leave as much as a crumb of cheese on my plate.
When in Calcutta and working night shift it was the general practice for the Second Mate, 5th Engineer and the Apprentice to tuck into Bacon Eggs and chips cooked by the appentice around about midnight.
I was a first tripper, never used an oil fired galley before or cooked chips either and first night I overflowed the chip pan and set fire to the galley stove. Grabbing a foam fire extinguisher I managed to get the fire out but of course covered the galley in heavy foam and deciding to minimise the damage, as you cannot turn off an extinguisher ,I ran with it to the ship,s side and let the blessed thing evacuate down into the fetid waters of KG dock. I then had to sougee the galley and hopefully nobody would know.
Next day I was rudely turned out of my bunk by a red faced Chief Mate - Thomas Orford who was like an enraged bull. It transpired that Southbank had been newly painted whilst in port by the infamous Babalal and whilst Orford and Capt. Smith were rowed around the ship in a sampan to see the contractors work and approve payment and what did they see but a streak of dried foam all the way to the waterline.
As punishment Orford put me over the side on a bosun,s chair to scrape and sougee the foam as soon as we cleared the Hoogly. As the ship sped along here was I hanging on for dear life, no safety belts in them days, but all to no avail as the best I could do was to paint over the foam. Thinking back it was a most dangerous Bligh like thig to do and I marvel now that I did not disobey his lawful command
Orford was a real bully whom I detested - but learned to get the better of before I signed off - but that is another tale.
Anybody out there who knew T Orford of the Wirral, Cheshire?

12-4
22nd April 2007, 22:04
Bank Line Flag =
Red for the blood we spill,
Blue for the sea we sail on
and white for the thin line of starvation

Sums it up for me - food was bloody awful but the copra bugs made for good entertainment and added important vitamins together with the BoT lime juice at smoko.

Calm C
13th May 2007, 23:58
When I was on the Inverbank in '75 I think there was only one teaspoon in the saloon which the steward used to carry about in his pocket. He would hand it to you to stir your tea, then put it back in his pocket! The curries were OK though and I remember the one with the boiled egg(s). there was one they called "Country Captain" but I think that was a chicken leg-possibly Sunday only. Also remember the BOT lime juice served on the hatch aft of the accomodation at smoko.

tumble38
16th June 2007, 21:54
I always remember joining the Northbank as first trip junior engineer and the donkey wallah making the tea with that tin of condensed milk and sugar.
I still cannot to this day drink tea with milk or sugar in it.

Brilliant shipping line I enjoyed my six years with them.

Duncan Mackay
8th October 2007, 23:45
The food was awful ,us apprentices used to look forward to a Thursday and Sunday ,why ? we got 2 eggs. I remember the variety of duffs e.g. black cap duff,syrup duff,current duff,marmalade duff and the list goes on. On one vessel we ran low on fresh water and we were rationed to one bucket per day for 2 weeks, the reason , the master took on the minimum amount in Colombo to save Weirs a few pounds. He did not get any medals but a hell of a lot of abuse.The penny pinching that went on in Bank Line by the company and the masters was incredible and crews suffered as a result.

kwg
9th October 2007, 09:19
Well you couldn't say breakfast wasn't 'organic'....all those creepy-crawlies in the cereal (cooked if you had the porridge)...ughhh

K urgess
9th October 2007, 10:54
To quote the old, old saying on trampships.
"Don't knock it. That's the only fresh meat you're going to get".
Compared to some of the cardboard breakfast cereals today it was.a probably more vitamin filled.
Crunchy and nutty cornflakes.

robparsons101
11th March 2008, 02:01
I have just posted an mage of the only menu I have left, it is from christmas 1981 on the Streambank. I also have recurring memories of the egg curry, also something called fish kidgeree and being on watch when the donkeyman brought the tea and toast down in the morning but he always managed to soak the toast with tea, yuk, Whilst I was on the Corabank in Lae we had some t shorts made with a pair of legs sat on the toilet and the words CORABANK GASTRO ENTERITIS CLUB emblazoned across it. this was frowned on by head office and a memo was sent out that in future no more t shirts featuring bank line shipe were to be commissioned. I still have mine in the wardrobe

sparkie2182
11th March 2008, 02:17
all this about poor feeding on the "bank boats"............

it wasnt all "plain sailing" on the cunard passenger vessels either..........

i remember one evening i ordered a rather demure , yet vivacious ,chateau rotheschild 1952
champagne .......... and do you know.............???

it was barely chilled..............:(

trotterdotpom
11th March 2008, 02:28
Scandalous! I hope the company didn't expect you to "broach the cargo" after such an embarrassment.

John T.

Dozy
1st April 2008, 13:15
I sailed with a C/O called Eddied Docherty on the Carronbank in the 60's. Years later (1984) I was on leave from the RNLI station at Spurn Point with my wife and two young children. We had borrowed a friend's yacht on the Clyde and were berthed in Rothesay. On Sunday morning we took the children for a walk along the sea front and the locals were all very nice, greeting us with a cheery, "Good Morning", or a, "Hello, how're you doing?"
An old man passed us by having been to collect his morning paper and I said, "Excuse me, is your name Eddie Docherty?"
"Why yes!" he replied in some surprise, "Do I know you?"
I told him who I was and that I had been a first trip apprentice with him all those years previously. He asked how I had recognised him and I said that he had hardly changed. At this his chest swelled with pride and he stopped other locals to regail them with the story.
We bade farewell and I walked away laughing------ I hadn't the heart to tell him that it was only his mean piggy little eyes that gave him away!!
I think this man would be at least 95 if he is still alive so I feel fairly safe telling the truth now! (Jester)

Strath101
7th October 2008, 21:09
Have put a Bankline menu from 1975 on 'Life onboard'

pete
7th October 2008, 22:20
Now look fellow seafarers, I will not admit to anything but the Master's favourite sweet was Kippers and Custard and Bubble and Squeek appeared as Bopple Squeaker. Fine company and I really enjoyed my 15 years with them, as for weevils in you wheaties,, Hell just pour the milk on, wait till they float to the top, and scrape the devils off.....................pete

pete
7th October 2008, 22:29
Ohh shoot I forgot to mention the Masters name was David Jones (No joke)................pete

Duncan112
8th October 2008, 16:48
Ohh shoot I forgot to mention the Masters name was David Jones (No joke)................pete

Sailed with a Captain D L Jones in "Troutbank" 1986, and spoke with him from "Oriental Bay" in the Red Sea during 1992, asked after him at the Bank Line Association do in 2004 and was told he had passed on, remember him as a good feeder and a gentleman.

Duncan

johnmilne
9th October 2008, 10:34
Have been following this thred with interest, also the menus posted . It takes me back to 1964 with Capt JW Greig on the Ashbank. It was this time we started getting two eggs on Thursday and Sunday. The fancy listing eggs to order had everyone guessing, How is he going to deal with this? Simple scrambled eggs only mentioned for those two days.
Cheers
John Milne

David E
10th October 2008, 01:23
Have been following this thred with interest, also the menus posted . It takes me back to 1964 with Capt JW Greig on the Ashbank. It was this time we started getting two eggs on Thursday and Sunday. The fancy listing eggs to order had everyone guessing, How is he going to deal with this? Simple scrambled eggs only mentioned for those two days.
Cheers
John Milne

Two eggs and Greig !! We had him in the "Inchanga" in 1951.The basic menus in the White Ships were specified by the Company and were far better than those in the rest of the fleet. We were also lucky to have a Purser in the ship called Johnson.In the ship for decades, he insisted on very high standards.In later years he died in harness.
Joining the "Forresbank", in North Shields, for my last trip in Bank Line, in 1952,Greig again.Fortunately, during a rant at the Mate about something or other,he fell down to the tween-deck of No.3 Hatch,broke a leg and was removed before we sailed.He was replaced by Capt.King,seaman and gentleman.

David E

Alan Rawlinson
13th December 2008, 17:13
Greetings Marconi Sahib,

I spent the whole of the 1950's in the Bankline, FORTH/HAZEL/WEST/INCHANGA/WEST/ERNE/MAPLE/IRIS/EAST/CREST/BEAVER/SOUTHBANK
and shunned all of the delicious curry offerings. I liked the look of the ones with eggs cast adrift on the multi coloured surface. Lovely hues. Years later I came to regret it, and to love curry. - On second thoughts, it might have saved my innerds, though!
AL

Alistair Macnab
26th December 2008, 00:14
All you Bank Line Menu Boys.......
It is obvious that most of you detest curried dishes but if you lived where I do where there is not a decent Indian/Pakistani restaurant for 50 miles, perhaps you'd long for one of these decidedly unique offerings. There's no point in having an ethnic crew if you don't accept ethnic cuisine.
Some of you were surely on the chinese crewed Bank boats where the ethnicity of the menu was something completely different?
On the "Inchanga", officers ate in the first class dining room from the same menu as the passengers only there were discrete asterisks adjacent to some of the more splendid items that denoted "Not for Officers". We used to get a passenger to enquire in a loud voice: "Mr....x...., why don't you try the grilled kidneys on toast, they are very good!" and when the saloon steward hesitated, the passenger would say: "Bring Mr.....x.... some!" We always had our passengers well trained!
Being on the shoreside of victualling in the USA, I can assure you all that ship stores were good quality from reputable chandlers. If something happened on the way to the table, you could put it down to the "Calcutta School of European Cookery" (shared with Brocklebanks and Ellermans) or the indifference of the Master.
But in closing, moaning about the food is a sailors priveledge and one that I enthusiastically joined in when at sea!
Bon apetite!
Alistair/Hamish

Derek Roger
26th December 2008, 01:31
Did you chaps ever try " Newfoundland Round Steak ? " Fried Bologna .


Derek

pete
26th December 2008, 11:13
Interesting thread this. It was joining Bank Line that put me on to Spicy Food. I am now quite an accomplished Curry Creator with over 50 Herbs and Spices in the cupboard, my wife really enjoys them, however, on the down side I cannot for the life of me cook RICE. Once ordered an Egg Omelette and after much discussion in the Pantry I received a 2 egg Omelette with a scrambled egg inside (==D) .....................pete

Johnnietwocoats
31st December 2008, 04:06
Joined Bank Line July 60 until July 64. East,Foyle,Fleet,Stream and Cedarbanks. All as Apprentice.

Can't ever remember complaining about the food. Working out on deck all day not to mention the long 30 hours at a time Tank Cleaning for Coconut Oil etc etc gave us Apprentices a healthy appetite.

Loved the Chips in the morning. They had Carbs on every meal. Remember, to the watchkeepers on the 4 to 8 this could be their lunch.

Loved the Curries. Never refused one. Loved the Bhandaries food as well. Am quite an accomplished Curry Cook to this day.

What I remember most was the meaness of some of the Masters. I have already mentioned one who was infamous. When we had chicken on the Menu the silly old fool would always wave his arms like a chicken and go "Cluck. Cluck" to order his chicken.

Never ceased to amaze me that Deck Apprentices always had to clean up for meals no matter what shitty dirty work they were doing while the Engineers got away with eating in the Engineers mess.

I did sail with a Captain McLean from Stornaway I think. He was a gentleman.

Carl Wadkin
2nd January 2009, 20:33
I've just posted menus from Christmas and New Year for 70/71 from the Ernebank, shortly after the mutiny. Don't be fooled, it was up to the usual low standard.
Speaking of things falling into one's food: On the Ernebank we took a young guy from the States to Australia as a passenger, he was assigned to the cadet's table in the saloon so we got a closer look at him and some of his rather odd (to us) eating habits.
One mid Pacific lunchtime we were tucking into the latest rubbish when I noticed a large cockroach crawling across the deckhead in our direction. By this time we cadets were used to fried cockroach in the chips, so it was only natural that the above cockroach should choose to loose it's grip directly above our American friends plate!
Ha, I can see his face now as it struggled to right itself in the centre of his food!

jg grant
2nd January 2009, 20:54
Interesting thread this. It was joining Bank Line that put me on to Spicy Food. I am now quite an accomplished Curry Creator with over 50 Herbs and Spices in the cupboard, my wife really enjoys them, however, on the down side I cannot for the life of me cook RICE. Once ordered an Egg Omelette and after much discussion in the Pantry I received a 2 egg Omelette with a scrambled egg inside (==D) .....................pete
Hi Pete. Try uncle bens long grain rice. You have to try really hard to stuff that one up. Regards RFG

jg grant
2nd January 2009, 20:59
I don't ever remember seeing a steak, fillet or otherwise. As you say plenty of curry though and 2 eggs on Sundays and Thursdays...WoW....

do you remember the BOT parody. There shall be three eggs per man per week perhaps! Regards RFG

Alan Rawlinson
3rd January 2009, 10:08
Hallo All Bankline foodies....

Can't really understand the obsession with eggs or lack of them. In my 10 years in the bankline, I was able to get an omelette nearly always on request, and as a replacement for the universal curry. What I missed! Today I would welcome some of the rainbow hued concoctions with eggs floating in the liquid.

I think I was a fussy eater in my youth, but genuinely have no complaints about the food on board in those days long ago. Can't remember feeling starving hungry, but must admit I look skinny in some of the old pics. Could it be that we all get obssessed with food due to boredom? There was a longing for fresh milk, and scampering ashore in the Gulf ports as soon as we berthed to raid the milk machine in the wharfside sheds.

What I also remember is the odd deep fried cockroach in with the chips, which was a source of amusement more than anything. and of course the copra bugs and weevils imbedded in the slices of bread. It was many years before I stopped lifting each slice up to the light before eating, in order to nip out the '' dark '' bits!

Re the discussion on how to cook rice - Basmati, in a largish pan with plenty of excess water and a touch of salt boiled up for 20 minutes will produce a lovely fluffy rice every time. Oh, for a Bankline Bundhary to provide the complimentary curry!

Charlie Stitt
3rd January 2009, 20:27
The first time I ever tasted a garlic steak was on the old Myrtlebank, they were cooked on top of the big coal fired range and were yummy. Can't remember getting one since however.What I would give now for a good Bank Line curry made from real curry beans and ghee. Madras, Kashmir,Dhall,Kopta,
Vegtable etc etc. How I loved the Smoko's when I was Apprentice, sitting on No 3 hatch outside the pantry door, a lovely cup of thick stewed char ( a spoon would stand up in it) a dollop of tinned milk AND a half a slice of home baked bread ( grey in colour) with some tasty marge. Did NOT do me any harm and we accepted it as a way of life on the ocean wave, Happy Days.

Waighty
23rd September 2009, 13:49
Bouli Hash, Kromeskie a la Russe, Potage Julienne - all memories from the past. You'd never see them these days. Overall, the food in Bank Line was first rate and plenty of it. The Tues, Thurs and Sun fry up with chips was a real treat. Remember one apprentice on Weirbank (circa 1972) on being offered the oval shaped serving bowl full of chips, took it out of the stewards hands and tipped the lot onto his plate! Another favourite - sauteed kidneys on fried bread - rich in onion gravy - delicious.

The most unusual food I saw was Devilled Heart - this consisted of thinly sliced, well cooked heart covered in hot picallili. Can't remember which ship but I think only two of us partook!

rcraig
23rd September 2009, 14:28
Minced collops, sheep's brains, condensed milk tea and when apples appeared at the Old Man's table we knew if we did not otherwise know that we were in Buenos Aires, 'cos they only appeared when he was entertaining his large number of German friends whom we knew came from a certain generation who had immigrated into B.A. from there in 1945. I never knew how we knew that, mind you, but we were more than happy to believe it as no apprentice ever put his teeth around one of these golden apples. And they and other goodies came out of the food kitty, we understood. As usual, there was always a conspiracy where food we could not get was concerned.
Took me years to like curries again. Far too many trips where food would be good for the first few days out of Calcutta and for the last couple of days coming back to it. Far too many meat curries where the green bits complete with gristle were supposed to be disguised by the curry sauce.
Made up for it since and make my own. But never, never a solid meat curry!

Alan Rawlinson
23rd September 2009, 16:42
I remember dragging sacks of brown Cuban sugar out of the No4 hatch and being instructed by the Master how to make terrific fudge. We simply poured tins of condensed milk over the sugar levelled out in huge trays on the galley stove - mixed it all up, and made it smooth and about bitesize thick. Cooked in a short time and delicious!!

All part of an apprentice's training I suppose.

jimthehat
23rd September 2009, 17:45
Was worked too hard as an app to worry overmuch about the standard of food,but from 3/0 onwards found the food great from isipingo thru ettrickbank and others have had a great love of curries since then,the ettrickbank was chinese crew and the food was great .We thought that being part of the inver trading co we received much better fare than the rest of bank line ,but maybe it was just down to being a happy ship.

jim

Johnnietwocoats
23rd September 2009, 22:02
Bouli Hash, Kromeskie a la Russe, Potage Julienne - all memories from the past. You'd never see them these days. Overall, the food in Bank Line was first rate and plenty of it. The Tues, Thurs and Sun fry up with chips was a real treat. Remember one apprentice on Weirbank (circa 1972) on being offered the oval shaped serving bowl full of chips, took it out of the stewards hands and tipped the lot onto his plate! Another favourite - sauteed kidneys on fried bread - rich in onion gravy - delicious.

The most unusual food I saw was Devilled Heart - this consisted of thinly sliced, well cooked heart covered in hot picallili. Can't remember which ship but I think only two of us partook!

Maybe the food was first rate in 1972..........They had years of practice on us that went before to perfect it.......

And of course the question could be, "First Rate compared to what"?

Someone said elsewhere that when we were hardworking Apprentices they could have offered us shite and we would have eaten it......

In the early sixties certain Masters ate well compared to the rest of the Officers......!!!!

Of course I have to say that I totally enjoyed my four year apprenticeship with Weirs in case someone thinks I have an axe to grind or am a whiner.....LOL...LOL

TC (Smoke)

Macphail
23rd September 2009, 23:04
Larchbank breakfast,

Grapefruit Halves, the Captains tiger would squeeze them to make fresh juice for the Captain, then top them up with water and put them on the table.
The steam puddings where top of the range, Bank Line sustenance, spotted dick should have been called copra bug pudding, the half cocky in the centre of the golden pudding added to the flavour.
I enjoyed every minute, never did us any harm.

John.

(Jester)

Johnnietwocoats
24th September 2009, 06:02
Larchbank breakfast,

Grapefruit Halves, the Captains tiger would squeeze them to make fresh juice for the Captain, then top them up with water and put them on the table.
The steam puddings where top of the range, Bank Line sustenance, spotted dick should have been called copra bug pudding, the half cocky in the centre of the golden pudding added to the flavour.
I enjoyed every minute, never did us any harm.

John.

(Jester)

How do you really know?

TC....(Smoke) (Smoke)

johnb42
24th September 2009, 11:24
I remember on the Northbank the tomato sauce having an SG of about 1005, due to the Butla 'watering' it down with vinegar to make it last longer.
It was around the time that Heinz had an advert on the telly at home, showing someone seriously palming the bottom of a tomato sauce bottle and a whole tomato rolling out of the bottle. I remember it being the root of some black humour.

China hand
24th September 2009, 19:26
Me stoopid, what does LOL mean??Maybe the food was first rate in 1972..........They had years of practice on us that went before to perfect it.......

And of course the question could be, "First Rate compared to what"?

Someone said elsewhere that when we were hardworking Apprentices they could have offered us shite and we would have eaten it......

In the early sixties certain Masters ate well compared to the rest of the Officers......!!!!

Of course I have to say that I totally enjoyed my four year apprenticeship with Weirs in case someone thinks I have an axe to grind or am a whiner.....LOL...LOL

TC (Smoke)

Duncan112
24th September 2009, 19:43
Me stoopid, what does LOL mean??

Laugh out Loud

Used in SMS (text) messaging

http://www.smsdictionary.co.uk/explain-abbreviation-LOL

has some other definitions on

Macphail
24th September 2009, 22:09
How do you really know?

TC....(Smoke) (Smoke)

In the short term OK, In the long term, din'a ken.

John.

Johnnietwocoats
25th September 2009, 02:04
In the short term OK, In the long term, din'a ken.

John.

LOL....Probably never did us any harm....We became immune to most diseases as Apprentices......


TC(Smoke)

simomatra
28th September 2009, 21:43
I have fond memories of spices and lots of curry.

Twas taught by the crews cooks, on visits down aft, for steering inspections when 2nd lecky. The skill has stawed with me today and I get lots of compliments on my ability to cook proper curry.

Do remember the fish sanwiches that where a nightly event in the cabin as super though.

Sunday lunch was the high light of the week in the saloon, best food came from aft and a few rupees did wonders.

Strath101
29th September 2009, 13:14
Ah the nightly sandwiches in the plastic box yuk never liked any of them but it was that or go hungry.

rcraig
29th September 2009, 14:19
Plastic boxes!? How could they ever taste right when the edges were not curled up and dry and the cockroaches had the proper right of way privileges they were entitled to in the old days?
Or did they do that first and then put them into plastic boxes?

simomatra
12th January 2010, 05:48
Found this, New Years Day Menu Forresbank 1967

Hugh Wilson
12th January 2010, 06:03
I never had a problem with Bank Line food, although breakfast was a bit unusual on the old Beaverbank (Harry Allen was Captain), with egg(one) bacon and chips 3 days a week, beans, spam and chips 3 days a week and the on Sunday, liver, mashed potato and one fied egg. Curry was available every day for all meals. Much the same in F C Stricks.

Abbeywood.
17th January 2010, 08:43
4E on the Eastbank, on the Copra run in late 1963.
After watch hand over at mid-day and the necessary shower, too late for the saloon attendance, so the mess-boy would be on hand to bring 'din-dins' to the cabin, (no duty mess),
His best concoction was a Kopta curry, and believe me when I say it was a real 'ball-burner' but was never wasted, every last morsel devoured.with the sweat oozing from every pore. but, by god, I enjoyed them. and still remember them. fifty years on, and especially the mobile raisins, i.e. the copra beetles.
I quite enjoyed the chips at breakfast as well. They complimented the eggs, of which I cannot recall any restriction on the number of days availability.
Red to the mast, blue to fly, with the white streak of hunger from the deck to the sky. Alas, that flag flies no more.

Donald McGhee
18th January 2010, 01:43
I sailed on three Bank Boats, Teviot, Inver and Mara. I can say that I had no complaints about the food and thoroughly enjoyed chips for breakfast and always had two eggs, or the omellette.
I still love curries to this day, nice and hot and enjoyed them then too.
Maybe I'm weird, or have a cast iron digestive system, (probably the latter),but I thought all my feeding experiences with Bank Line were good.

Happy days when appies all thought the world revolved around their stomachs when at sea, elsewhere when ashore!

John Dryden
18th January 2010, 02:28
I,m the same thanks to Bank Line,stomach like a Belfast sink.Having said that I cannot believe that we ate grapefruit,porridge,eggs, bacon,chips and loads of toast and jam,then back to work until lunch and eat a huge curry,only to be hungry again to eat a big dinner about 6 and still find enough room for a case of beer!

kwg
18th January 2010, 10:13
There must have been 'two' Bank Lines, the one I sailed with the food was nothing to write home about....creepy crawlies in everything and I mean everything.

Charlie Stitt
18th January 2010, 10:54
In the 1950's and 60's we got bacon egg and chips for breakfast twice a week, Thursday and Sunday, we called them Board of Trade days, remember? But what about, Poached Egg With Mince Scollop, And Mashed Potatoes, first thing in the morning. We must admit, whoever made up our breakfast menue, had a great sense of humour. I thought LOL in TC's messages meant LOTS OF LOVE.(==D)

Joe C
18th January 2010, 16:13
In the 1950's and 60's we got bacon egg and chips for breakfast twice a week, Thursday and Sunday, we called them Board of Trade days, remember? But what about, Poached Egg With Mince Scollop, And Mashed Potatoes, first thing in the morning. We must admit, whoever made up our breakfast menue, had a great sense of humour. I thought LOL in TC's messages meant LOTS OF LOVE.(==D)

I found this in the archives

Charlie Stitt
18th January 2010, 18:09
Joe,I did'nt look at the date, but read the mouth watering menue, is this a wind up I thought, then my eye caught the date on top. Christmas Day. I just knew it must have been a special day as we did'nt normally get kippers.(Jester)

rcraig
18th January 2010, 18:30
Ah, the minced collops. Never had them since. And rarely the sheep's brains which we got and for some reason I identify them with Buenos Aires. I hold them directly responsible for the current state of my memory!

Most folk have remarked on fond memories they have of the curries and how good they were. But my recollection is of good curries on the way out of Calcutta when the Chief Steward (what did we call them again?) wished to impress and also just before returning again.

In between, curries were often disguising poor gristly meat and after I left Bank Line I did not touch curries for years although I returned to them and make my own now. But I still never have a meat curry in a restaurant.

Charlie Stitt
18th January 2010, 19:42
Ray,you old fusspot, the curries were yummy, so long as the guys ahead of you did'nt take all the juice. I can still hear the Officer's Boy muttering away to himself,as he held the bowl of egg curry to some inconsiderate yob who took out most of the eggs, yes there was always one on board, greedy yob, that is.The best curries come from down aft, on a long standby, a japatti ?? filled with hot curry was much appreciated by me, no I took no notice of the rough looking bhandarry with a rollup hanging from his mouth, and a big drip hanging from his nose, who served up this tasty morsel. That curry was so hot it killed all known germs.:sweat:

rcraig
18th January 2010, 20:11
Ray,you old fusspot, the curries were yummy, so long as the guys ahead of you did'nt take all the juice. I can still hear the Officer's Boy muttering away to himself,as he held the bowl of egg curry to some inconsiderate yob who took out most of the eggs, yes there was always one on board, greedy yob, that is.The best curries come from down aft, on a long standby, a japatti ?? filled with hot curry was much appreciated by me, no I took no notice of the rough looking bhandarry with a rollup hanging from his mouth, and a big drip hanging from his nose, who served up this tasty morsel. That curry was so hot it killed all known germs.:sweat:

Yes, yes, I'll grant you that. The egg curries were good but in old Stan's ship (even now the use of Holbrook's first name, used in another thread by someone who obviously does not believe in an after life, makes me look over my shoulder just in case...) I can't readily believe there was more than one egg for an apprentice.....but of course, the sheep's brains...

They were obviously good for windage.

Alan Rawlinson
18th January 2010, 21:58
Ah, the minced collops. Never had them since. And rarely the sheep's brains which we got and for some reason I identify them with Buenos Aires. I hold them directly responsible for the current state of my memory!

Most folk have remarked on fond memories they have of the curries and how good they were. But my recollection is of good curries on the way out of Calcutta when the Chief Steward (what did we call them again?) wished to impress and also just before returning again.

In between, curries were often disguising poor gristly meat and after I left Bank Line I did not touch curries for years although I returned to them and make my own now. But I still never have a meat curry in a restaurant.

Ray,

Was exactly the opposite for me! I wouldn't (and didn't) have a single curry in the Bankline days, and have always regretted it. I especially remember seeing the egg curries with the shimmering liquid on top. A sort of flourescent liquid over all. Works of art, they were.

Johnnietwocoats
20th January 2010, 06:49
Jeez I loved all the food during my Apprenticeship with Bank Line...

I can honestly say that there was never anything on any menu, Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner that I did not eat...

But of course when yer a young lad working all the hours that the good Lord above sends you need yer food....

Currys, Fish and Chips for Breakfast and the odd Japatii filled with Curry from the Bhandari made life bearable......

Made me appreciate the Beefie De Lomas in BA....Hope I got that right.

TC(Smoke) (Smoke)

Johnnietwocoats
20th January 2010, 06:51
Who was the Old Man who used to ask for Chicken by flapping his arms in a poor imitation of a Chicken with its head cut of.......?

I'll give you a clue tomorrow.......TC(Smoke) (Smoke)

rcraig
20th January 2010, 18:18
Remember the lime juice every day? A sliver of pure acid at the bottom of a glass. Without sugar it made your eyes water. And for some weeks with the Old Man, Holbrook, we were denied sugar on the basis that all they were required to do under BoT regs. was to supply lime juice.

What on earth inspired such tiny savings?

McMorine
21st January 2010, 13:11
It sure did make your eyes water, but I bet you never got scurvy!
Regards Mac.

Johnnietwocoats
21st January 2010, 22:21
Remember the lime juice every day? A sliver of pure acid at the bottom of a glass. Without sugar it made your eyes water. And for some weeks with the Old Man, Holbrook, we were denied sugar on the basis that all they were required to do under BoT regs. was to supply lime juice.

What on earth inspired such tiny savings?

Ahh...The powerful Old Men in the Bank Line.......(Smoke) (Smoke)

rcraig
21st January 2010, 23:28
Who was the Old Man who used to ask for Chicken by flapping his arms in a poor imitation of a Chicken with its head cut of.......?

I'll give you a clue tomorrow.......TC(Smoke) (Smoke)

The one I saw doing that had just gently run aground....So THAT is what he was doing!

Alan Rawlinson
8th October 2010, 18:30
Who remembers the veg ' Silver beet' appearing on the Bank Line menu?

Another word for ' spinach beet' and so called because the chopped up stem glints silver among the green leaves.... Have just enjoyed some tonight, and it brought back fond memories.

ccurtis1
8th October 2010, 19:48
On the Irisbank, 1964 vintage, there were three tables in the saloon. The centre table was the Old Man, Chief Officer, Chief Engineer, Second Engineer and the Sparks. The Engineers table consisted of the 3/E, 4/E, 5/E, 6/E, Electrician and 2nd Electrician. The Deck crowds table was the 2/O, 3/O and the three gadgets. On the days when we had fresh fruit, say apples, (which was a cause for celebration), the Butla weighed out the said apples and we were allocated the weight, calculated against the number of people sat at the table. Not one apple per soul, but we would receive on the Engineers table, perhaps 3 and a half apples between 6 of us. Same for the Deck lads, but I am sure the centre table got one apiece. Perhaps "boatlarnie" can confirm or deny. We too had two eggs per week. Bacon egg and chips, Thursdays and Sundays. Curries were always better prepared by the Bandari aft, and we bought fresh meat ashore and asked the Bandari to prepare, with a little renumeration of course. Saying all of that, the food on board was always plentiful, but to this day, I still examine bread slices up to the light. Old habits die hard.

jimthehat
8th October 2010, 23:25
On the Irisbank, 1964 vintage, there were three tables in the saloon. The centre table was the Old Man, Chief Officer, Chief Engineer, Second Engineer and the Sparks. The Engineers table consisted of the 3/E, 4/E, 5/E, 6/E, Electrician and 2nd Electrician. The Deck crowds table was the 2/O, 3/O and the three gadgets. On the days when we had fresh fruit, say apples, (which was a cause for celebration), the Butla weighed out the said apples and we were allocated the weight, calculated against the number of people sat at the table. Not one apple per soul, but we would receive on the Engineers table, perhaps 3 and a half apples between 6 of us. Same for the Deck lads, but I am sure the centre table got one apiece. Perhaps "boatlarnie" can confirm or deny. We too had two eggs per week. Bacon egg and chips, Thursdays and Sundays. Curries were always better prepared by the Bandari aft, and we bought fresh meat ashore and asked the Bandari to prepare, with a little renumeration of course. Saying all of that, the food on board was always plentiful, but to this day, I still examine bread slices up to the light. Old habits die hard..
memory is a little hazy ,BUT I thought that on the isipingo 57/59 we got eggs on a daily basis.As i remember it the eggs were brought out on a tray and placed on a wall table ,they were so available that the stevedores (european ) in Mombassa would waltz into the saloon and shove 3-4 eggs on their plate without any concern for myself and the apps who would come in for breakfast after the mate had relieved us,anything from the Inchanga guys.

jim

David E
9th October 2010, 00:23
.
memory is a little hazy ,BUT I thought that on the isipingo 57/59 we got eggs on a daily basis.As i remember it the eggs were brought out on a tray and placed on a wall table ,they were so available that the stevedores (european ) in Mombassa would waltz into the saloon and shove 3-4 eggs on their plate without any concern for myself and the apps who would come in for breakfast after the mate had relieved us,anything from the Inchanga guys.

jim

In Inchanga,'50/'52, although we had moved away from the "Pound and Pint" regime evident in the rest of the fleet there were separate and shorter menus for the Mates and Engineers-even so the range of dishes listed was far better than the offers found in the rest of the fleet.
Moving to Fyffes in '53 the contrast in standards was staggering-one common Menu serving Passengers and Officers in the 12 passenger and larger ships-although in the latter the range of food was more extensive.A key to the excellence was that the Company controlled the victualling of the whole fleet and it was not in the hands of the Masters

Alan Rawlinson
9th October 2010, 09:54
In Inchanga,'50/'52, although we had moved away from the "Pound and Pint" regime evident in the rest of the fleet there were separate and shorter menus for the Mates and Engineers-even so the range of dishes listed was far better than the offers found in the rest of the fleet.
Moving to Fyffes in '53 the contrast in standards was staggering-one common Menu serving Passengers and Officers in the 12 passenger and larger ships-although in the latter the range of food was more extensive.A key to the excellence was that the Company controlled the victualling of the whole fleet and it was not in the hands of the Masters

What you never have, you never miss, I suppose... I can recall the ' Inchanga ' food being adequate, but the detail of the menus has gone. I was an omelette nut in those days, and I think the galley produced these in quantity!

On a different ' Inchanga' note, David, I wonder if you can help with something that has been puzzling me. When we apprentices were on deck supervising the water ration to the crew ( and deck passengers) there was a hand pump in the forward deckhouse, and when the crew were not busy killing chickens by slicing open the necks, they performed their ablutions. Teeth cleaning was carried out by dipping a finger in a wooden box of something screwed to the bulkhead and rubbing the teeth and gums. It produced a beautiful result, and I always imagined it was fine sand??? However, could it have been that. Too abrasive, I imagine. Any ideas?

Alistair Macnab
9th October 2010, 16:03
During 1958 to 1960 when I was Third Mate on the "Inchanga" we junior Deck wallahs sat at the round six-seater table in the First Class Dining Room to the right of the main stairway coming down from the Purser's Bureau where we were joined on occasion by younger single passengers. The menu was the same for officers and passengers alike except that there were asterisks adjacent to certain items that officers were not supposed to order as they were for 'passengers only'. I don't remember the forbidden items being particularly exotic except one which I always managed to obtain anyway. It was chilled asparagus with bearnaise sauce. Still drool over it to this day! Incidentally, Captain Harry Allan did away with the menu discrimination after he took command.

I aways felt that the effect of the grand descending staircase into the Dining Room flanked by the two gold art deco naked ladies was somewhat wasted as it was the only main means of internal access between the main and promenade decks meaning that all traffic had to pass through the dining room. I believe that this problem was resolved on the "Incomati" where, because this ship was longer by some 15 feet, the grand staircase descended into a cross alley with the restaurant entrance immediately opposite the foot of the staircase accessed through double glazed doors. Seems to have been a much better arrangement.

Interesting memory feature: Mrs. Bowness, the stewardess, always fitted knitted bras for the statuettes during high days and holidays. She seemed to believe that naked titties were OK for the rest of the year!

jimthehat
9th October 2010, 16:54
During 1958 to 1960 when I was Third Mate on the "Inchanga" we junior Deck wallahs sat at the round six-seater table in the First Class Dining Room to the right of the main stairway coming down from the Purser's Bureau where we were joined on occasion by younger single passengers. The menu was the same for officers and passengers alike except that there were asterisks adjacent to certain items that officers were not supposed to order as they were for 'passengers only'. I don't remember the forbidden items being particularly exotic except one which I always managed to obtain anyway. It was chilled asparagus with bearnaise sauce. Still drool over it to this day! Incidentally, Captain Harry Allan did away with the menu discrimination after he took command.

I aways felt that the effect of the grand descending staircase into the Dining Room flanked by the two gold art deco naked ladies was somewhat wasted as it was the only main means of internal access between the main and promenade decks meaning that all traffic had to pass through the dining room. I believe that this problem was resolved on the "Incomati" where, because this ship was longer by some 15 feet, the grand staircase descended into a cross alley with the restaurant entrance immediately opposite the foot of the staircase accessed through double glazed doors. Seems to have been a much better arrangement.

Interesting memory feature: Mrs. Bowness, the stewardess, always fitted knitted bras for the statuettes during high days and holidays. She seemed to believe that naked titties were OK for the rest of the year!
The table for the third mate ,sparks and the stewardess was right on the stb side of the saloon,the two statutes were Issy and Pingo.

jim

Alan Rawlinson
9th October 2010, 16:55
During 1958 to 1960 when I was Third Mate on the "Inchanga" we junior Deck wallahs sat at the round six-seater table in the First Class Dining Room to the right of the main stairway coming down from the Purser's Bureau where we were joined on occasion by younger single passengers. The menu was the same for officers and passengers alike except that there were asterisks adjacent to certain items that officers were not supposed to order as they were for 'passengers only'. I don't remember the forbidden items being particularly exotic except one which I always managed to obtain anyway. It was chilled asparagus with bearnaise sauce. Still drool over it to this day! Incidentally, Captain Harry Allan did away with the menu discrimination after he took command.

I aways felt that the effect of the grand descending staircase into the Dining Room flanked by the two gold art deco naked ladies was somewhat wasted as it was the only main means of internal access between the main and promenade decks meaning that all traffic had to pass through the dining room. I believe that this problem was resolved on the "Incomati" where, because this ship was longer by some 15 feet, the grand staircase descended into a cross alley with the restaurant entrance immediately opposite the foot of the staircase accessed through double glazed doors. Seems to have been a much better arrangement.

Interesting memory feature: Mrs. Bowness, the stewardess, always fitted knitted bras for the statuettes during high days and holidays. She seemed to believe that naked titties were OK for the rest of the year!

Brilliant anecdotes, Alistair and Jim!

Pity the Incomati was torpedoed so early in her career. Somewhere in these threads is a most interesting account of the sinking by, I believe, the Sparkie at that time. There was loss of life, but believe it was some poor soul, and not the whole lot.

Inchanga story: We had a fit, predatory, Leckie, in my time, accommodated in the adjacent cabin to us apprentices. There were frequent grunts and groans, and thumping noises as he serviced any and all of the likely females on board, most of whom seemed quite willing and appreciative........

China hand
9th October 2010, 19:32
Nah, dont believe it. From first trip appy until I left (the first time) it was always ONE EGG per DAY except on Thursday and Sunday when there were TWO!! This is of course only breakfast, there were a few egg curries at lunch. We did not eat luxuriously, but we ate pretty well.[=P]

David E
10th October 2010, 00:46
What you never have, you never miss, I suppose... I can recall the ' Inchanga ' food being adequate, but the detail of the menus has gone. I was an omelette nut in those days, and I think the galley produced these in quantity!

On a different ' Inchanga' note, David, I wonder if you can help with something that has been puzzling me. When we apprentices were on deck supervising the water ration to the crew ( and deck passengers) there was a hand pump in the forward deckhouse, and when the crew were not busy killing chickens by slicing open the necks, they performed their ablutions. Teeth cleaning was carried out by dipping a finger in a wooden box of something screwed to the bulkhead and rubbing the teeth and gums. It produced a beautiful result, and I always imagined it was fine sand??? However, could it have been that. Too abrasive, I imagine. Any ideas?

Alan,
Sorry,I can't help on that one-I can remember most details even 58/59 years back but the teeth cleaning detail escapes me.

I do remember the Leckie-I used to borrow his suits-well meaning relatives inflicted a series of contacts ,who would appear and offer hospitality,usually in one of the Clubs,where suits were required.Two years plus out of the UK I'd outgrown everything I had.

Some of the best years I had at sea were in Inchanga

David

Alan Rawlinson
10th October 2010, 08:36
Thanks David,

Yes, the Inchanga days were memorable - For me, the Inchanga conjurs up:

days picnicking in Mombasa harbour - chugging out in the old cumbersome lifeboats to sandy beaches....

The spicy smell emanating from the big ventilators in the accommodation alleyways...

Hours in the makeshift wooden swimming pool, with the water sloshing in time to the ship's motion.. the beady eye of the 3rd Mate watching from the bridge above..

endless days in a noisy hell in Calcutta undergoing refit or in drydock.. why was she always in need of so much repair????

Anchor work in the muddy water off Sandheads - my responsibility being the wooden anchor buoy and wire...

Days on the bridge as makeshift 3/0 when we were short - not having a b... clue what was going on! Why did we always seem to transit through the Maldive channels at night on the 8 to 12.

etc



Alan,
Sorry,I can't help on that one-I can remember most details even 58/59 years back but the teeth cleaning detail escapes me.

I do remember the Leckie-I used to borrow his suits-well meaning relatives inflicted a series of contacts ,who would appear and offer hospitality,usually in one of the Clubs,where suits were required.Two years plus out of the UK I'd outgrown everything I had.

Some of the best years I had at sea were in Inchanga

David

boatlarnie
14th October 2010, 20:46
On the Irisbank, 1964 vintage, there were three tables in the saloon. The centre table was the Old Man, Chief Officer, Chief Engineer, Second Engineer and the Sparks. The Engineers table consisted of the 3/E, 4/E, 5/E, 6/E, Electrician and 2nd Electrician. The Deck crowds table was the 2/O, 3/O and the three gadgets. On the days when we had fresh fruit, say apples, (which was a cause for celebration), the Butla weighed out the said apples and we were allocated the weight, calculated against the number of people sat at the table. Not one apple per soul, but we would receive on the Engineers table, perhaps 3 and a half apples between 6 of us. Same for the Deck lads, but I am sure the centre table got one apiece. Perhaps "boatlarnie" can confirm or deny. We too had two eggs per week. Bacon egg and chips, Thursdays and Sundays. Curries were always better prepared by the Bandari aft, and we bought fresh meat ashore and asked the Bandari to prepare, with a little renumeration of course. Saying all of that, the food on board was always plentiful, but to this day, I still examine bread slices up to the light. Old habits die hard.

Jeez, cannot remember how many apples we used to get on the centre table but I have to say Len Thorne was a pretty fair Master so doubt if the Butler would have got away with that. Food was pretty good on the Iris although pretty much Bank Line standard. Eggs were always fried with 2 on a Thursday and Sunday; I could hardly look at a fried agg when I came on leave. Steaks were certainly at a premium so yes, whenever possible, we all took a run up the road and tucked into a good thick 'T' bone or something but what the hell, it was 1967/68 and we lived pretty well when compared to other companies. Worst feeder I was with was one Norman Kent (who does not seem to have been mentioned in SN). Anyone remember his nickname?? He used to boast he could feed each man on 1 and 6 pence a day and I believed him. The condensed milk was kept in his cabin, Chief Steward was issued so many tins per day for consumption and this was on the UK coast!!. One afternoon I woke prior to going on watch (I was mate) to find the Steward bringing in just tea as the milk ration had been used up. There was a bit of a carry on so the MNAOA was called in with the result we ddid get a fresh milk issue; one third off a pint per Officer per day, this being given to you in the morning to last all day.

Ian Harrod
15th October 2010, 02:35
Captain Kent; get the spelling right, it was with a "K" and "E".

Waighty
15th October 2010, 12:20
The thing that used to fascinate me was the chips for breakfast - only ever saw this on a Bank boat (Mind you I did a stint on one channel ferry which shall remain nameless and found breakfast for the passengers being cooked in the deep fat frier sausages, bacon, mushrooms, fried bread, eggs the lot and finished off under the IR lamps)

Question though, what caused the orangy/red grease round the mince in its various incarnations, never been able to replicate that!!

Chips for brekafast was a real treat and as you say exclusive to Bank Line. When on Weirbank circa 1972 I remember one appy taking thw whole oval bowl of chips out of the stewards hands and depositing the lot on his plate - he ate the lot too!

I have also seen the deep fat fryer breakfast (ashore) up to the point where the cook put whole tomatoes in straight from the fridge - the resulting explosion was spectacular but downright dangerous; it was a miracle no one got burnt by cascading fat. No risk analysis in those days.

boatlarnie
15th October 2010, 13:25
Captain Kent; get the spelling right, it was with a "K" and "E".

He was one of the Bank Line Eleven and his nickname, as I heard it, was Kent the (absolutely unrepeatable on this forum!!)

John Hebblewhite
15th October 2010, 13:47
Birchbank in Rosario near BA. We only had curry at Lunch, chips for breakfast was to fill you up as there was not much else and one egg does not go far. The menu( see attachment) was printed inside a Xmas card.

Rgds John

JOHNKITTO
18th October 2010, 12:46
Birchbank in Rosario near BA. We only had curry at Lunch, chips for breakfast was to fill you up as there was not much else and one egg does not go far. The menu( see attachment) was printed inside a Xmas card.

Rgds John

With regards to the crew list on the menu, Was H L Peens the 4th Engineer Louie Peens a short well built South African?