Brocklebanks ex Cunarders/Port Line ships.

Stuart Smith
23rd February 2005, 23:36
As an ex Brocklebank Engineer who left the sea before the Brocklebank/Cunard tie up I am looking for information as to with what engines the following Brock's ships were fitted, ie steam turbine or make of Diesel. Any information would be most welcome.
Mahronda 1V (Saxonia)
Malancha 111 (Alaunia)
Manaar 1V (Port Chalmers)
Manipur 1V (Ivernia)
Masirah 111 (Port Alfred)
Matangi (Port St. Lawrence)
Matra 1V (Port Caroline)

Stuart Smith

japottinger
24th February 2005, 00:20
Manaar ( Port Chalmers) 2-6 cyl Sulzers; Masirah ( Port Alfred) 7-cyl B & W;
Matangi (Port St Lawrence) 7-cyl B & W; Matra (Port Caroline)2-6-cyl Sulzer
Manipur (Ivernia) 7-cyl Sulzer; Mahronda (Saxonia) as Ivernia
All grease driven engines I am afraid.
Hope that helps

Stuart Smith
24th February 2005, 10:14
Thanks for all that top info Jim, can now add that to my research log.

Marcus Cardew
24th February 2005, 18:19
Hi Stuart,
Malancha 111 (Alaunia)
It's many moons ago, but I remember that the Alaunia had an HP / LP Steam Turbine, Impulse, I think, and had quite a few 'Admiralty' nozzles that were sealed, but were occassionaly 'used' when the Chief had some bunkers 'in the bag', and we really wanted to be home on time. (i.e Christmas 1966). I'll see if I have a note anywhere on who was the manufacturer... The Saxonia and Ivernia were Sulzer 7-RD68's from 'changing liners at sea' memory... (The sort of occasion when us Deckies' were welcomed down below)

Stuart Smith
24th February 2005, 20:42
Yes, would be interested in info on Malancha engines, and brings back memories of having to change a crosshead in mid Atlantic while on Mahout. It was all hands to the pumps, so to speak.

japottinger
25th February 2005, 00:00
Alaunia was built by WM. Hamilton for Cunard, and had turbines built by David Rowan

john g
3rd March 2005, 20:17
Yes, would be interested in info on Malancha engines, and brings back memories of having to change a crosshead in mid Atlantic while on Mahout. It was all hands to the pumps, so to speak.

Would be interested re cross head problem (mid atlantic} We carried out cross head surveys on the Mahout early in 1969 during the longshoremens strike in Savannah. C/E Jimmy Grant 2/E Jim Wort. We had to borrow gear from the Makrana bearthed alongside. Not a good experience I remember it well................John G

japottinger
3rd March 2005, 20:24
Jimmy was CH Eng. on my last trip as 3rd on Matra Feb. 1961.
Nice lad, no great fuss about anything provided you knew what you were doing.
Not displeased either when we found our way into the cargo of 1,200 tons of prime Malt ex-Glasgow-New York, our bar bills were negilible, who wants to drink cans of beer when the nectar was flowing.

japottinger
4th March 2005, 13:56
I still say that sssshteam was better than grease driven any day!

Stuart Smith
18th March 2005, 22:35
Dear John G
The Cross Head problem came on Mahout's 2nd voyage and also my 2nd deep sea. It was April 1964 and we were mid Atlantic heading for Wilmington. The weather was non too good with a very heavy swell running, not being a deckie the correct terms escape me. Anyway I seem to remember it was on the morning 8 to 12 and I'm abed as one should be when the alarm went, meaning "get your a***e down here quick". On arrival in the engine room we found main engine stopped and everyone running around in a panic. Well that's how it seemed to me, just a second trip apprentice. My buddy Dennis Henshaw, also a member of this site, was also on his 2nd deep sea and can verify these facts and maybe even add to them if there is something I have forgotten.
Anyway it was suspected that a crosshead had gone on, I think, No 5 cylinder.
Even the chief was down there, that's how serious it was and we were told that the skipper would have to keep the bow pointed into the wind and sea until we could fix the problem. Again I probably got the terminology wrong.
We were split up into teams, and while one was taking off the cylinder head with the purpose of lifting out or supporting, I can't remember which, the piston and piston rod, Dennis and I undid the dog clamps on the crankcase door of the offending cylinder.
It was our job to undo the big end bearing nuts and bolts and extract the bottom end shell. When we got the door open the heat coming out from the lower end compartment was incredible and we couldn't see anything for a mist of hot fine lub oil particles. In we went armed with the big flat ring spanner and sledge hammer and after supporting the lower half of the bearing began to undo the nuts, one of us holding the spanner in place while the other swung the hammer. All this while we were trying to keep our balance on hot, extremely slippy surfaces and with the ship motion very erratic.
The rest is a bit vague as to what had exactly broken, it was one of the crossheads guides or xhead bearing that had gone. I also can't remember how long it took but I do know that we did a good job and were thanked by the old man for it.
The memory and taste of the heat and oil mist in that crankcase will stay with me forever.
If you read this Dennis, is there anything that I have missed?

Stuart

R58484956
4th June 2005, 17:08
Malancha 8195 tons built 1937 3 steam turbines single reduction geared to one screw shaft

john g
8th June 2005, 20:47
Dear John G
The Cross Head problem came on Mahout's 2nd voyage and also my 2nd deep sea. It was April 1964 and we were mid Atlantic heading for Wilmington. The weather was non too good with a very heavy swell running, not being a deckie the correct terms escape me. Anyway I seem to remember it was on the morning 8 to 12 and I'm abed as one should be when the alarm went, meaning "get your a***e down here quick". On arrival in the engine room we found main engine stopped and everyone running around in a panic. Well that's how it seemed to me, just a second trip apprentice. My buddy Dennis Henshaw, also a member of this site, was also on his 2nd deep sea and can verify these facts and maybe even add to them if there is something I have forgotten.
Anyway it was suspected that a crosshead had gone on, I think, No 5 cylinder.
Even the chief was down there, that's how serious it was and we were told that the skipper would have to keep the bow pointed into the wind and sea until we could fix the problem. Again I probably got the terminology wrong.
We were split up into teams, and while one was taking off the cylinder head with the purpose of lifting out or supporting, I can't remember which, the piston and piston rod, Dennis and I undid the dog clamps on the crankcase door of the offending cylinder.
It was our job to undo the big end bearing nuts and bolts and extract the bottom end shell. When we got the door open the heat coming out from the lower end compartment was incredible and we couldn't see anything for a mist of hot fine lub oil particles. In we went armed with the big flat ring spanner and sledge hammer and after supporting the lower half of the bearing began to undo the nuts, one of us holding the spanner in place while the other swung the hammer. All this while we were trying to keep our balance on hot, extremely slippy surfaces and with the ship motion very erratic.
The rest is a bit vague as to what had exactly broken, it was one of the crossheads guides or xhead bearing that had gone. I also can't remember how long it took but I do know that we did a good job and were thanked by the old man for it.
The memory and taste of the heat and oil mist in that crankcase will stay with me forever.
If you read this Dennis, is there anything that I have missed?

Stuart

Thanks for that Stuart I finally caught up with your reply....I guess those planks which fitted perfectly in the crankcase just below the crosshead/piston nut must have been quite new at that time. Q. Did you do the dry dock on her in Birkenhead around that time ? Was at college in Birkenhead at the time and got a saturday tour by an apprentice who gave us all the info on the company rules regarding alchohol etc !!!...john g

Stuart Smith
9th June 2005, 11:28
John

I paid off Mahout in London on return from deep sea around May 16th 1964 and went on leave before joining Makrana for deep sea. The only dry dock I experienced was with Makrana but it was in Govan Dry Dock. That was very handy for me as my father was from Govan and I had many relations still living there at that time.
I hope that the apprentice gave you the correct slant on company rules regarding booze for app's:-
You could drink as much as you wanted when coming off watch and up to and including 9 cans before going on watch provided you could do the rapid descent of engine room ladders (not touching stair treads between top and bottom plates) without falling flat on your face at the feet of the 3rd Engineer on the control platform. !!!! I think not.
Dennis Henshaw and myself had to wait until our third trip (Makrana) before we were allowed to drink beer. The 2nd (name escapes me but was a Welshman) allowed us to buy 2 cans per day and we were monitored as to our conduct with alcohol. At this time Dennis was just short of his 21st birthday!
We used to suppliment this allowance with cans of ginger beer mixed with the beer so that it seemed to go twice as far.
Certainly on our first two trips I do not remember being allowed to buy/drink beer in any form. On odd occasions a sympathetic Leckie or Chippy would slip us a free beer, especially after a gruelling day spent working with the said benifactor.
Even after all this "hardship" I wouldn't swop my experiences with Brocks for all the tea in China.
Stuart (Thumb)

Jim S
28th January 2006, 21:18
Alaunia was built by WM. Hamilton for Cunard, and had turbines built by David Rowan
Of same vintage as Mangla and Mathura and by same builder and engine builder. Andania and Alaunia were slightly smaller in tonnage and overall length than the Brock pair but were faster and more powerfull with output of 10,000 shp as opposed to Mangla/Mathura's 7250 shp.
That said I believe the Brock pair to be technically superior. eg the two Cunarders still had d.c power by 4 Ruston generators. The a.c Mangla/Mathura had 3 Allen diesels and a Brotherhood back pressure type turbo-alternator for use at sea. All had similar Foster Wheeler ESD boilers.
During my time as a Weir apprentice I worked on both Andania and Mangla and at that impressionable age preferred the machinery layout of the latter.

Jim S

Mike Wild
23rd October 2006, 14:30
Slow response as I've just seen your post, but I took the Alaunia, or Malancha as she then was on her last voyare as a Cunard-Brock vessel, handing over to the Malaysians in Rotterdam. She became the Humi Nasita and they had the new name painted on her by the time I'd paid-off on 19th May 1971.

Having sailed on the Mangla as well I'd agree with everything you say, although mine's a deckies perspective!

Steve Cameron
8th May 2009, 16:17
Mike
Just registered and found your posts on the site. Would you allow a Port Line and Camel hand to buy you a catch up drink or 3?
Regards
Steve Cameron

frankbutler
26th July 2009, 23:04
Steve Cameron im new to the SN site caught your name whilst trawling missed you in the meley at Vintage Port see you next year .regards.

Derek Roger
27th July 2009, 01:28
Dear John G
The Cross Head problem came on Mahout's 2nd voyage and also my 2nd deep sea. It was April 1964 and we were mid Atlantic heading for Wilmington. The weather was non too good with a very heavy swell running, not being a deckie the correct terms escape me. Anyway I seem to remember it was on the morning 8 to 12 and I'm abed as one should be when the alarm went, meaning "get your a***e down here quick". On arrival in the engine room we found main engine stopped and everyone running around in a panic. Well that's how it seemed to me, just a second trip apprentice. My buddy Dennis Henshaw, also a member of this site, was also on his 2nd deep sea and can verify these facts and maybe even add to them if there is something I have forgotten.
Anyway it was suspected that a crosshead had gone on, I think, No 5 cylinder.
Even the chief was down there, that's how serious it was and we were told that the skipper would have to keep the bow pointed into the wind and sea until we could fix the problem. Again I probably got the terminology wrong.
We were split up into teams, and while one was taking off the cylinder head with the purpose of lifting out or supporting, I can't remember which, the piston and piston rod, Dennis and I undid the dog clamps on the crankcase door of the offending cylinder.
It was our job to undo the big end bearing nuts and bolts and extract the bottom end shell. When we got the door open the heat coming out from the lower end compartment was incredible and we couldn't see anything for a mist of hot fine lub oil particles. In we went armed with the big flat ring spanner and sledge hammer and after supporting the lower half of the bearing began to undo the nuts, one of us holding the spanner in place while the other swung the hammer. All this while we were trying to keep our balance on hot, extremely slippy surfaces and with the ship motion very erratic.
The rest is a bit vague as to what had exactly broken, it was one of the crossheads guides or xhead bearing that had gone. I also can't remember how long it took but I do know that we did a good job and were thanked by the old man for it.
The memory and taste of the heat and oil mist in that crankcase will stay with me forever.
If you read this Dennis, is there anything that I have missed?

Stuart

Stuart ;
I may be missing something ? but how could the skipper keep the bow pointing into the wind until you fixed the engine when he had now power ? Sails perhaps .
Derek

Tony Sprigings
5th August 2009, 16:55
Derek, I was Mate on that voyage and Paddy Jackson was the 'Old Man'. The answer is we didn't! Cheers,
Tony

sidsal
14th August 2009, 21:44
The name Paddy Jackson brings good memories. He was a real gent and his wife who was from near Caernarfon was a nice lady too. Paddy was Mate on the Malakand (2) when I was uncertificated 4th Mate at the very end of ww2 or immediately after.
(Correction - acording to my discharge book it was Matheran and it was Oct 1945 to April 46)

Philthechill
15th August 2009, 08:44
The name Paddy Jackson brings good memories. He was a real gent and his wife who was from near Caernarfon was a nice lady too. Paddy was Mate on the Malakand (2) when I was uncertificated 4th Mate at the very end of ww2 or immediately after.
(Correction - acording to my discharge book it was Matheran and it was Oct 1945 to April 46)Absolutely agree 100% with you Sidsal re. Paddy Jackson. I sailed with Paddy on "Makrana" and, after one particularly "arduous" docking in Kidderpore, involving many, many rapid engine-movements which had reduced me, "on the wheels", to a limp sweat-soaked rag, Paddy rang down and thanked me personally for the rapid answering of the pilot's "demands" as we had been picking our way through the usual melee of barges etc. littering the dock!

As any engineer, who served on "Makrana", (or her sister-ship, "Mawana"), will tell you they weren't the easiest to manoeuvre with their single FW watertube boiler!!! Rapid engine-movements could have the water either about to vanish out of the bottom of the glass or soaring dangerously close to the top!!! Certainly had your sphincter permanently puckered!!!!!!

Paddy's son Erin was the absolute spit of his Dad, too, being a similarly courteous, genuine gentleman in the truest sense of the word. Salaams, Phil(Hippy) P.S. I posted a photo of "Makrana's" crowd (Life on board in The Gallery) when we were in Vizag for Christmas (1962 I think) and you can see Paddy on it.

Pat Kennedy
15th August 2009, 13:17
As an ex Brocklebank Engineer who left the sea before the Brocklebank/Cunard tie up I am looking for information as to with what engines the following Brock's ships were fitted, ie steam turbine or make of Diesel. Any information would be most welcome.
Mahronda 1V (Saxonia)
Malancha 111 (Alaunia)
Manaar 1V (Port Chalmers)
Manipur 1V (Ivernia)
Masirah 111 (Port Alfred)
Matangi (Port St. Lawrence)
Matra 1V (Port Caroline)

Stuart Smith

Stuart,
I was on the Ivernia from new, joining her in the Caledon Shipyard in Dundee. All went well on her sea trials, but on her maiden voyage, Liverpool to New York, it became apparent that she was prone to heavy rolling, so much so that the cooling water intake would from time to time come clear of the water.
When that happened, all hell broke loose in the engine room, klaxons sounding, bells ringing and the main engine would shut down.
It must have happened seven or eight times a day on the eight day crossing.
On return to Liverpool she went into Gladstone Drydock and the water intake assembly was modified. After that it happened only now and again, (at least once a trip)
All things considered she was a fine ship.
Pat

david freeman
3rd December 2009, 11:23
As an apprentice engineer cadet 59-61 at Constantine Middleborough we often walked the Middlesbrough dockside. Many Stickline Ships (Mainly Doxfords, and a lot of Brocklebank Boats! Of which a few had 4 scotch boilers oil fired stokehold and steam turbines main engines and built in 1912-16. They were generally loading steel as an initial cargo before Hull, London and Rotterdam for onward voyage to India. The sailing engineers were great and showed us all around during our many visits to the docks. The accommodation for engineers was pretty tight on extras and space.

sidsal
3rd December 2009, 21:03
I could well be repeatring myself as I feel I have posted this experience before - but here goes. 1944 - Maihar - Taranto in the heel of Italy to Philadelphia. Completely light ship - no ballast. Rolled so much the intake came out of the water repeatedly and we were put at the rear of a column in the convoy. Slept in our clothes as the thump of landing on the sea in the stormy weather made it sound as if we'd been torpedoed. Because the engine was shut down so often we had to go full ahead to catch up with the 8 knot convoy. One dark night I was on the 4 to 8 watch and my relief said they had lost the convoy and were going full ahead when possible. I was told to keep a sharp lookout ahead for the convoy. As dawn was breaking a dark low shape appeared close to - we thought it was an u-boat. Turned out it was a 4 stacker US destroyer. Megaphone contact - " How far ahead is the convoy ?" Answer in US drawl - " You are ten miles ahead of the convoy, captain. We are the forward outer escort "
Later, as it got light we saw the convoy dead astern.
We had managed to sail straight through the convoy without seeing anything.
Bridge started to disintigrate too - concrete slabs fell and broke the bridge ladder and it was decided to pass wires over the bridge structure and tighten with bottle screws.
It had been intended that we called at Casa Blanca for sand ballast but it didn't happen.

WOMBLE
5th January 2010, 03:18
I was a Fifth Engineer on the Port St lawrence in 1980 then trading as the Matangi. I seem to remember she had a 7 Cylinder opposed piston B&W built under license by Harland and Wolff. He Sisiter ship Masira would have been the same spec.(I have more details somewhere at home).

Chalmers and Caroline were Sulzer RDs if memory serves, but I cannot swear to that!



As an ex Brocklebank Engineer who left the sea before the Brocklebank/Cunard tie up I am looking for information as to with what engines the following Brock's ships were fitted, ie steam turbine or make of Diesel. Any information would be most welcome.
Mahronda 1V (Saxonia)
Malancha 111 (Alaunia)
Manaar 1V (Port Chalmers)
Manipur 1V (Ivernia)
Masirah 111 (Port Alfred)
Matangi (Port St. Lawrence)
Matra 1V (Port Caroline)

Stuart Smith