The heat in the stokehold

carpenter
14th April 2007, 09:45
Hullo, everybody there
Have anybody ever heard the measure about the heat, there below in stokehold of a coalburning steamers,The real heat in Farenheat or Cels, taken in fornt of these furnace and under the stokhold-vents, when a ship was sailing, for example at Red Sea in April or off the marlbari coast.

John Rogers
14th April 2007, 13:06
It was very hot but never had a thought about taking the temperature, it was also very hot above the boilers.
Most of the time we were in shorts with a rag around our necks, the heat of the fires would dry off the sweat and we never worried about it.
John

carpenter
14th April 2007, 18:33
There was almost steady temperature as 40-47 degree on deck, in the mouht of the Gulf and no wind in April. I wonder, what it could be in stokehold. It must have been real purgatory there.

JoK
14th April 2007, 19:18
In front of the scotch marine boilers (oil-fired) on the ship I was on, must have averaged between 120-130*F during a Canadian summer. This was all natural ventilation. We never had thermometers there, but it was at least that.
It was hot enough above the boilers, that wooden staging that had been forgotten in the fidley burst into flames after it had dried out enough. The fellows that fought the fire (I was off at the time) told me that a fire extinguishers being handed up, discharged and handed back down would burn the hand of the person below they were that hot.
I sailed about 4 years later with a C/E who sailed in the PG on steamers who scoffed at my experiences, so I can't even imagine what temperatures the stokehold would reach there! (EEK)
I do know when I went to the diesel ships I darn near froze to death in the engine room. I couldn't imagine anybody actually wanting to work there.

billyboy
14th April 2007, 23:38
125° in the boiler room of the SS Londres. she was oil fired. we stood in a belt of high pressure air in watch by inflating our boiler suit from the fan above our heads. it was ok unless you reached up, soon brought your hand down again as i found out as a new boy! after shut down and a waiting time of an hour the fiddley door could be opened and a freshly washed shirt would be dried in 10 minutes. untill another guy new to the ship put his in there on a plastic coat hanger...LOL

JoK
15th April 2007, 01:36
If you wore a gold chain and leaned over, the chain would burn your neck when you straightened up.

Brian Twyman
15th April 2007, 04:50
Dunno what the temperature was, but our EO took the Defence Pay Review team (all colonel rank) behind the boilers whilst he blew soot :sweat: ..... fastest escape up the E/R ladder you ever saw (EEK) Dunno if the E/R crew got a pay rise either.

carpenter
15th April 2007, 07:36
no wonder, it made terrrible noice

jock paul
15th April 2007, 14:03
I can't remember ever recording stokehold temperatures, but in oil burners I believe the stokehold was actually more cofortable than the engineroom. The stokehold was more of a dry heat without the humidity associated with the engines. Coalburners, especially natural draught, were however another matter. When a firedoor was opened or with a pile of red hot ash on the floorplates it was sometimes almost an act of willpower to go anywhere near the boiler fronts. I saw quite a few firemen wear a sack as a hood while on watch to ward off the radiant heat from the boilers. The worst situation on these ships was a stern wind blowing the same speed as the ship's headway(paddy's hurricane). then there were desperate efforts by the hands to swing the stokehold ventilators (no fans) to catch the slightest breath of a breeze. Often the deck watch was very co-operative with this. They would station their Standby Man by the fiddley to swing the vents. Occasionally the course was altered a few degrees to try and get some air into the stokehold. This wasn't done for the comfort of the crew but to get a sufficient quantity of air to the fires for good combustion, and therefore full steam pressure.

carpenter
15th April 2007, 16:38
Thank you Paul, you really know what it was. I remember as the stokers poured wather on the hot ash on the floor plate, and then there was a cloud of white ash in air.

lakercapt
15th April 2007, 17:07
I had the "pleasure" of working in the stokehold when there were several of our firemen sick (think it was Ramadan).
There was always plenty of fresh air coming down the vents and the worse time was when dumping ashes as there was dust all over and had to douse them with water before sending them up in the ash hoist (worked from the vaccuum in the main condenser.
When you opened the furnace door to put it a few pitches it was very hot and your belt buckle got too hot to touch.
THe stokehold was not the hottst place but the boiler tops were dangeriously hot.
E/R was not too comfortable either.
There used to be a canvas bag hung under the vent and the water there was cool. No ice water machines the.
Great experiance but I was glad it was only for a few days.
Bill

Bob Preston
15th April 2007, 17:57
Reina del Mar engine room & boiler room were combined. At sea temps above 76 it 134! Coming back fro B.A. to Cape Town we had one of the 4 blower motors burn out. It got to hot to stay in the engineroom; we had it in turns to scutter round to check the job every 15 mins. It was 146 in front of the main switch board. We spent the rest of the watch in the Stabiliser compartment.
On the VLCC Casterbridge (originaly Bulford) the only thing that kept us going was babies nappy rash cream. Everywhere your boiler suit rubbed you raw.
Good old days.

Bob Preston

John Rogers
15th April 2007, 20:52
Lakercapt paints a real good picture of what went on down in the stoke-hold. Just to add to what he said about throwing a bucket of water on the hot ashes, some nasty firemen would play a trick on the oncoming watch and take a leak in the bucket,then they would stand at the top of the fiddley and wait until they threw it on the hot ashes and listen to the watch below scream threats at them because of the awful smell,believe me it was rotten.
John.

ChrisGLCole
15th April 2007, 21:34
Hi Carpenter
Only sailed on the British Kennet a Sulzer 6RND76 diesel with Babcock/Wilcox auxy boilers, in the Gulf and Red Sea, but we recorded the temperature by the turbocharge inlets at 50oC, in June, while passing Jizan, (just south of Jeddah) Of course the humidity made it worse, and we were under orders from the chief to only maintain the operational condition of the engine room. No extra maintenance work, while in the area. The Gulf was much cooler. In those days, early 80's, most of the BP fleet had A/C'd control rooms. Chief got very upset with the Juniors dripping sweat onto his logbooks! Asked us to stop leaking over his paperwork! ChrisC

jim brindley
16th April 2007, 03:39
hi carpenter was only on two coal burners .the bantria .and bayano .but never gave it thought .but i was on deck .

raybnz
17th April 2007, 09:04
Reading the water temperatures then the exhaust pyrometers on the Waipawa was one hot job. With the exhaust gases pouring out of the bottom of the liner skirts combined with the heat it was near impossible to get a correct reading for the log.

Then the chief would want a set of indicator cards. Now that was a art in itself trying to keep the cards clean and dry.

When I was on the British Osprey working around the gulf I would seek out a ventilator and spend a considerable amount of the watch keeping cool.

I found boiler rooms more comfortable temperature wise than in motorship.

billmaca
17th April 2007, 16:01
getting cracked lips for the first few days was one of the little annoying bits about working in a stokehold


Billy

Riptide
4th March 2008, 00:49
In front of the scotch marine boilers (oil-fired) on the ship I was on, must have averaged between 120-130*F during a Canadian summer. This was all natural ventilation. We never had thermometers there, but it was at least that.
It was hot enough above the boilers, that wooden staging that had been forgotten in the fidley burst into flames after it had dried out enough. The fellows that fought the fire (I was off at the time) told me that a fire extinguishers being handed up, discharged and handed back down would burn the hand of the person below they were that hot.
I sailed about 4 years later with a C/E who sailed in the PG on steamers who scoffed at my experiences, so I can't even imagine what temperatures the stokehold would reach there! (EEK)
I do know when I went to the diesel ships I darn near froze to death in the engine room. I couldn't imagine anybody actually wanting to work there.
Changing steam smothering valves,less than two mins.sit outside & it looked as though you had wet yourself,all sweat from your body.Kenny.:sweat: (MAD)

Derek Roger
4th March 2008, 01:42
In my experience on Steam Ships and Motor the temperature on the floor plates near to the fan vents was always over 120 degrees f East of Suez .

The boiler tops was something else and to go up and open the soot blower master valve was a chore in itself which only took about 4 to 5 minutes ( That was enough !!) after blowing soot ( which took place from the Middle level of the boiler ; still very hot but not as hot as the tops . of course one had to go up and shut it again .

Never took the temperature up there but one could not be there for more than a few minutes ..

If a job had to be done on the boiler tops ( Such as trying to stop a leaking gland or flange at sea in the tropics it usually involve two engineers spelling each other after about 5 to 10 minutes .
We would put all the necessary tools in a bucket of water to keep them cool as if you were to leave the tools on the open grating they would soon be to hot to handle .

Regarding the stokehold on the ships I sailed on they wernt to bad . A bit hotter than the control platform but well ventilated if one stood under the fan outlets between jobs such as changing burner tips etc .

On one trip down the Red sea the temperature on deck was recorded as 132 degrees F during a dry sand storm .

Sea temperature in the Persian Gulf was often in the upper 90 Degrees F ; the highest I saw was 98 .

Oh Happy Days

HALLLINE
6th March 2008, 21:46
Try cutting out by hand, then expanding some fire row tubes in a Babcock boiler that has not long been shut down and emptied, while still steaming at slow ahead on the other boiler, and your in the back end, on your knees. Now that's HOT.
dave

billmaca
6th March 2008, 23:26
Derek Roger's post reminds me of a job on an Esso tanker it was either the Coventry or the Bristol, but we had to repack a top door on one of the boilers in the gulf, god knows what the temp' was but It was a case of doing a bit in relays ,one of you putting the packing in and the other hand belting it in , by time the next two got there most of the time the bit you had done was blasted back out again

albert.s.i
7th March 2008, 11:37
hi guys, i was fireman for a long time and knew all about heat but my worst experiance was on the lord gladson loaded with army stores from marselles to siagon for the french foriegn legion and although there were iron bars welded across the ventilators to stop broaching the cargo i at 10 stone vollinteered to go down number 4 hatch nearest to the aft quarters were firemen and sailers lived so down i went with grate diffigulty just after leaving suez in march 1949 it was hot and i started passing the parcels up to a couple of a,bs when we thought that was enough and believe i just had a pair of shorts on and i was saturated absolutly soaking with sweat the two A,Bs had an arm each to get me out then i realised i had swollen with heat they were shoe horning my backside and my testicles were hurting like hell after about half an hour i was outand was i glad!! that was hot!albert.s.i

Anubis
16th March 2008, 15:57
I was an electrician on the RFA Tidereach in 1967 sailing up the
Persian Gulf to Banda Shapoor. When we got past the Coins, the boiler room temperature got up to 140 F, but the temperture on the gantry above the tops was 170F. Needless to say I found work to do elsewhere on the ship.

japottinger
16th April 2008, 12:24
On the two ships I sailed on to India etc via Red sea, the Mahiar (I) and Manipur, the hottest I experienced was 138 on the platform in the engine room of the Manipur.
The fronts of two Foster Wheeler WT boilers backed right on to the man. platform and generated a lot of heat. I can only imagine what it was on the boiler tops but when we went up there to open stop valve to the soot blowers we were almost fully wrapped in asbestos lagging!
Yes asbestos !
By the time we had opened the valve and making for the ladder to come down to the platform we had to throw the wheelspanner and torch to the other watchkeeper as were too hot to hold.

Another pig was expanding the leaking economiser tube ends at the back of the boilers. A section of the outside casing had to be taken off for access and the hot gases were blowing on you when struggling with the expander.

I recall once CH eng. Johhny Macallum coming down once and thought he could do it quicker without muffling up in all the asbestos gear and gloves, as soon as he put his arms inside the casing and got a taste of the zephyrs wafting up he said Ouch! and dropped the expander toot quick I can tell you.

Right inside the casing, which meant that we had to strip off the bottom section to retrieve the expander, he kept mum about that episode.

The Maihar engine room was not bad, coollest pllace was through the bulkhead opeining between engine room and boiler room and in the narrow space between the bulkhead and the back of the two aftermost boilers, there was a good draught there.

Happy Days ?

twogrumpy
16th April 2008, 20:49
Suggestion was made to a engineering super in BP that the best way to improve the soot blowing facilities on one of their wrecks would be to run extended spindles into the firemans and seamens alleyways.
Found that there was little relief finding a job to do on deck in the hot weather. Down the pit it was stinking hot, and on deck it was stinking hot plus you had the sun beating down on you.
At least at the end of the day there were a few cold beers in the evening, in later years in air conditioned comfort.
Even with the heat, did prefer to be out east rather than running around NW Europe.
twogrumpy

brian hay
3rd May 2008, 16:44
Try cutting out by hand, then expanding some fire row tubes in a Babcock boiler that has not long been shut down and emptied, while still steaming at slow ahead on the other boiler, and your in the back end, on your knees. Now that's HOT.
dave

What ship guess it was an Ellerman..Had same trouble on City of Manchester
and on City of Liverpool.Cutting tools on board were about as good as
chocolate fire guards,but got them out after a bit sweat etc Have bit of trouble now getting into the back end!!

Steve Hodges
4th May 2008, 16:39
I recall having to expand some tube ends in the water drum of a Babcock boiler, lying on top of the desuperheater tube nest and working the expander about an inch from the end of your nose. Not desperately hot but rather claustrophobic. Anyway, the Chief decided that he was going to check out our handiwork. We thought that wasn't really a good idea, as he was a big fat old boy, but he was a real know-all so we thought we would just let him get on with it. Anyway , he managed to wriggle himself in feet first through the drum door, but when he tried to get out he found that he had expanded as well as the tubes. He managed to get his upper torso out but his belly was well and truly wedged. He was getting hotter and hotter and more and more agitated, and that just made things worse. There were some muttered suggestions that if we started filling the boiler we could flush him out! Anyway, we got him out eventually by pouring iced water over him followed by washing up liquid, then with a donkeyman pulling each arm he came out like cork from a bottle.
Happy days!

HALLLINE
15th May 2008, 22:58
What ship guess it was an Ellerman..Had same trouble on City of Manchester
and on City of Liverpool.Cutting tools on board were about as good as
chocolate fire guards,but got them out after a bit sweat etc Have bit of trouble now getting into the back end!!

Hi Brian, it was the Singapore. I was a long time on the Manchester in the 60's but had no trouble. Half the bother was the open feed system and only 4 fire Babcock boilers in the Birkenhead class
Dave

spongebob
15th May 2008, 23:25
Has any SN member ever crawled up the furnace tube of a Scotch marine boiler to blank off a leaking tube?You are old if you have!
A few old timers around when I was younger used to tell tales of this horrendous effort. Draw the fires, swathe the body in a multitude of clothing layers as insulation and crawl up the furnace to reach into the combustion chamber to get the sealing washer and the the nut started on the rod that had been fed through the leaking tube from the smoke box.
They used to say that this had to be done in a matter of seconds and with a rope around your ankle so they could pull you out if you passed out. All this with a bit of steam pressure still on the boiler.

surfaceblow
16th May 2008, 01:45
I plugged a tube in a American Pacific Marine Scotch Boiler with my father when I was seven years old (1960). The boiler was used to heat a apartment building and for hot water. The boiler was off for a few days. I had a lot of fun walking in the furnace area and climbing up to find the tube with the rod. We rebricked the floor that summer so my job was to run the bricks and water to the men placing them on the floor. At my height I never had to crawl.

Stuart Smith
16th May 2008, 10:51
On Brocklebank's Maidan on my first deep sea, Dennis Henshaw and myself had to re-pack a valve gland on the boiler tops. We did it in 5 minute stints and each minute the one outside the door opened it and yelled OK?
The temperature was recorded at 146F......
Stuart

HALLLINE
17th May 2008, 21:49
Bob, CITY of NEW YORK, Bombay docks, 1965, taking funace deflections with a poker gauge.The boiler was still full of hot water and this was my first job on nights,as a junior.Only tube plugging job at sea was on Babcock boilers.
Dave

david freeman
1st June 2008, 20:27
In the red sea and the gulf in the stokehold and boiler tops was rather hot on a steamship especially if one was the one sent to blow tubes, or in a motor ship with exaust gas fired scotch boilers between the boilers of ontop or in the stokehold it was the dryness of the exhaust gas and the ambient temperature which made things unpleasant.

Pegleg Horace
2nd June 2008, 00:20
While I never served on coal fired ships, I can say that as a young engineer cadet in 1967, I was fortunate enough (thanks to a kindly old Chief!!), to be given the job of sootblowing the two Babcock & Wilcox oil fired water-tube boilers every morning at 07-00, with the assistance of the other engineer cadet.

I too wondered at that time what the temperature was on the boiler tops, and therefore left a thermometer up there one morning. The following morning it read 165 deg Farenheit. However, the vessel was passing through the Panama Canal at that time, so the boilers were only lightly loaded - presumably at full load, the temperature may have been even higher.

Contrast this with a recent experience on a twin engined, medium speed motorship. We were rebuilding No.1 alternator from the bedplate up, located on a platform that was at the same level as, and ran alongside the exhaust manifold trunking for the Port main engine. The air temperature here was a mere 63 deg Centigrade. This sure illustrates one of the advantages of motor ships!

Pegleg Horace
2nd June 2008, 00:52
Has any SN member ever crawled up the furnace tube of a Scotch marine boiler to blank off a leaking tube?You are old if you have!
.

Did have the pleasure of being i'nvited' to expand tubes at the back end of a Scotch Boiler (on the City of London in 1964 if memory serves correctly) , when we called in at Aden for bunkers. There was about 10 to 15psi on the boiler at the time- ("so we can see where the leaks are" I was told) - and it was like being in Hell - so much so, that the Devil himself crawled in after me to show me what to do - in the person of the 'kindly' old Chief Engineer (NOT) - by the name of George Dunn! Jim Cree was the 2/E

and thanks for reminding me that I'm old!!!(MAD)

spongebob
2nd June 2008, 04:09
You were a brave man Pegleg, it sure is hot in there.
You mention Jimmy Cree, was he a tall good looking but prematurely greying Scot?

HALLLINE
4th June 2008, 14:45
Pegleg, I remember jimmy Cree, big belfast man,didn't need the engineroom telephone,just shouted down. I sailed with him on various 'City boats' both as 2nd and Chief,he'll have gone with the end of the steamers.
Dave

Pegleg Horace
5th June 2008, 06:49
Pegleg, I remember jimmy Cree, big belfast man,didn't need the engineroom telephone,just shouted down. I sailed with him on various 'City boats' both as 2nd and Chief,he'll have gone with the end of the steamers.
Dave


You've got it exactly right!! He was a man to be feared when I was a lad, though on reflection 40 years or so later, he probably had more to put up with from us cadets and juniors, than we had from him. However, as a callow youth I didn't see it that way at the time, and neither did the fiver, who was Mr Cree's particular whipping boy that trip. At the end of the trip, on pay-off day, minutes before he left the ship, the fiver armed himself with the biggest scissors he could find, and disapeared into the changing rooms.

On his return, he grabbed his bags and headed for the gangway, and waiting taxi. As he left, he casually informed me that he had cut the backsides out of all the 2/E's boilersuits!! I too left shortly afterward, so I never did hear the outcome!!

The last I heard of "Big J.C. " he was Chief a number of years later - it may have been the C/O Manchester - when the ship had a bit of an incident in Lobito, Angola. I think it took the ground entering or leaving, and as a consequence of losing cooling water, suffered major condenser tube failure. I never heard of him again after that, which would have been somewhere between 1973 and '76 if my memory serves correctly (and as someone has remarked elsewhere in these forums, it often doesn't these days!!!:confused:

That period would also have coincided with the demise of steam in favour of motor.

chadburn
21st June 2008, 17:34
As has been previously written about jobs in the stokehold they were a fast means of losing weight especially on the fiddley tops and I never saw a fat Fireman!! most of we "steamies" were built like racing snakes at the time, however there was a series of ships that had their boilers at deck level with of course the engineroom down below. The idea I presume was to save space by reducing the engine/boiler room length to increase cargo capacity, did anybody out there work on them?

surfaceblow
22nd June 2008, 02:55
I sailed on quite a few steam ships with a combined engine and boiler room. The Bethlehem Steel ships had the boilers burners on the same level has the turbine controls. The DC heater and Forced Draft Fans up and the rest of the machinery down.

Philthechill
22nd June 2008, 10:14
I was J4/E on Brocklebank's "Matheran" in Port Sudan and, after a prolonged heavy-work-load-induced episode caused a build-up of heat in me, I flaked-out due to heat-exhaustion. My temperature was (apparently) 104F. It took me a couple of days of light-duties (lamping-up!! Har! Har!) to recover. I felt as weak as a kitten though.

On my very first trip I found out about the delights of prickly-heat and it was an RAF bloke in Aden, who was on board "tallying" some RAF stores, who told me about Asepso antiseptic soap. Next time I was ashore in Steamer I went to the chemist (was it Boots?) on the main drag and bought some. Absolute bliss after I'd started using it!!

Another problem I had was the inability to keep the "salties" down.

I mentioned this to the chemist in Aden, whilst buying the Asepso, and he told me that they stocked chocolate-coated salt-tablets which were targeted at people like me who had a problem with the ingestion of the uncoated "salties".

I bought the biggest f**k-off bottle they had and it lasted for months! No more problems though!!

Then there was dhobi-rash!!

What a nightmare that could be, especially if you were attempting to impress some female! You would be ashore all dressed-up in your newly-pressed slacks, freshly dhobi'd shirt and (unseen of course!) "shreddies". Then, as the tropic night wore on and you were probably getting a little sweaty in the nether regions-----------the dhobi-itch would kick-in!! You would be trying your level best to carry-on with your best chat-up lines whilst fighting the irresistible urge to scratch your nuts! Eventually, of course, the dhobi-itch would win and you would excuse yourself and head for the bog to have a good ferret-around your "meat and two veg" almost weeping with relief at (1) getting some cooling air round your overheated "bits" and (2) almost scratching yourself red-raw to relieve the remorseless torment!!

Course when you got back to "the-light-of-your-life" you'd find your best mate had moved-in on her and carried-on where you'd left off! To add insult, to injury, he would then be giving you the eff-off sign behind her back!!!!!

The answer, of course, was to dhobi your smalls yourself and not send them ashore as it was probably the dhobi-wallahs who didn't rinse all the soap out caused the problem in the first place!!!

Happy days!! Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

chadburn
22nd June 2008, 11:39
Surfaceblow thank you for your input, like yourself I have sailed on vessels with combined boiler/ enginerooms, however my understanding of the vessel's that I am looking for working info on was that the boilers were in a housing at deck level with the engineroom below them. Phil the "Root" cause of the problems was most probably as you say to do with rinsing out "everything" correctly, if only we knew then what we know now!!!

HALLLINE
22nd June 2008, 11:59
As a junior, first trip to Bombay,I can remember being told by the 2nd to give our new 'made to measure' boiler suits a good wash first or would really know what prickly heat was all about. Anybody remember Gerimal the Bombay tailor, a run ashore suit measured one day pinned up the next and delivered the third !.
Dave

Philthechill
22nd June 2008, 18:47
Charles! Salaams! Sorry I never replied to your query earlier about boilers above engine-rooms. I was too busy recounting the heat-induced miseries we used to suffer in tropical waters!!

The two Ro-Ro ships "Atlantic Causeway" and "Atlantic Conveyor" (lost in The Falklands) had the configuration of boilers above the engine-room which, as you correctly surmise, was for cargo-reasons.

However not only were the boilers (Foster-Wheeler ESD roof-fired) above the engine-room they were also positioned fore and aft rather than port and starboard. This arrangement led to a remarkably narrow boiler-casing which was ideally suited for the carriage of Ro-Ro cargo.

The engine-rooms, which had two AEI turbines had quite a low deck-head as this was the bottom of the boilers so they tended to be extremely hot and noisy. Luckily we ran the engine-room from the comfort of a sound-proof a/c equipped Control Room. We would still go for a walkabout every so often though as, even with the high-level of sophisticated instrumentation, we older hands couldn't quite trust what we were reading from the instruments!

I posted an article on a Thread someone set-up asking for details about sailing on either the ACL or ACT ships about the night one of the superheated steam-pipe safety-valves "fell off" on "Conveyor" The Thread is "cunardbrock act 2/6 or acl atlantic ships"!! Cheers bud! Phil(Hippy)

chadburn
22nd June 2008, 19:17
Thank You Phil for the info, like yourself not keen on a lot of instrumentaion, it was always mark 1 eyeball for me, I went on a privately owned twin engined steam yacht last year moored in Monte Carlo both her aux and main boilers were for and aft, lovely pair of quad expansions in her and her American built engineroom was kept in superb condition. It was nice to sniff that unique smell that comes with a steam job again. Best Wishes

chadburn
23rd June 2008, 12:00
If you old steam hands want to see a nice little Triple Expansion with attached Condenser and "casually placed" oily rag go on to the S/T Rudokop site, there is a lovely shot of a Steam Tug that was built at South Shields.

waldziu
26th June 2008, 18:29
This reminds me of when I was up the Gulf in the late 80s on the Scylla. When we sprung a leak in the Stbd Blr economizer. We were in defense watches, 6 on 6 off. During the 6 on I would steam a pair of Y136 B & W steam attomisation boilers. With the Stbd Blr problem we shut it down and striped it down for an eternal clean prior to the chippy welding the leaking tube. So on my six on, I would either spent the first 3 hours steaming the working port Blr and and the next 3 striping down the other boiler, whilst my opposite N did like wise. Around 150 on the top plates. (certainly helped to keep me slim)

When we arrived in Mombasa a few weeks later the planed Blr cleans were reduced to 50% as we had already cleaned the Stbd one. More time on the beach. Boy did we have it hard in the RN. (Jester)