Newcastle Star Suez 1964

Newcastle Star
20th April 2007, 11:27
Last deep sea trips May 1964 to May 1965 to Aussie/New Zealand as R/O.
Great ship especially with the "Stornoway contingent". First time I had seen a chippie on the foredeck winch playing the accordian coming into port. Capt Hunter was not too pleased!!

Rob Randle
22nd April 2007, 17:57
Hi Vernon,
I was senior cadet in the "Newcastle" the trip before you. Joined her January 1964 in Hobart ( transfered from the "Rockhampton Star" after a round trip from Oz to the east coast of north America on the MANZ run.)Paid off in Vic dock in December '64.I went out to "Oz" to join the "Rockhampton on board her sister the "Hobart Star", although the company had neglected to tell me I would be joining a "MANZ boat" and would be away for over 13 months.That was in the days when shipowners didn't like flying crew members out to join ships abroard, especially not cadets.My next ship after the "Newcastle" was the other sister the "Canberra Star", I sailed in her for almost a year. Happy days!If my memory is correct the "Chippy" the trip I did in the "Newcastle" was a guy from Kent who had spent many years in the RN.There was a strong Hebridean contingent on the "Hobart", all but 2 of the deck crowd,(I think), being from Barra.
Rob Randle aka "Henry"

Newcastle Star
29th April 2007, 12:26
Hi Rob,

As far as I remember, the Bosun was from Barra and he was the brother-in- law of Capt. Hunter, Chippie was the Bosun's best mate. Capt Hunter was from Glasgow. I saw him on a few occasions where he would dearly loved to have given them a good kick up the A**
Great ship to have been on and the cadets and myself were the best of friends, unfortunately lost contact now.

Cheers

Vernon

Hugh Ferguson
29th April 2007, 13:54
During a piloting career of 27 years there remain only a few ships that stand out in one's memory: the NEWCASTLE STAR arriving Dungeness Pilot station, and the subsequent passage into the Thames, on 3rd Jan. 1963, is one of mine. I boarded up an iced up pilot ladder at 0130 and headed off into an E.N.E. gale in moderate snow, and without benefit of radar, to arrive Gravesend a weary eight hours later with no trains operating!
The winter of 1962/63 could well have persuaded one to believe that we were entering a new ice age. How times have changed!

Pat McCardle
29th April 2007, 16:17
Hi Vernon,
I was senior cadet in the "Newcastle" the trip before you. Joined her January 1964 in Hobart ( transfered from the "Rockhampton Star" after a round trip from Oz to the east coast of north America on the MANZ run.)Paid off in Vic dock in December '64.I went out to "Oz" to join the "Rockhampton on board her sister the "Hobart Star", although the company had neglected to tell me I would be joining a "MANZ boat" and would be away for over 13 months.That was in the days when shipowners didn't like flying crew members out to join ships abroard, especially not cadets.My next ship after the "Newcastle" was the other sister the "Canberra Star", I sailed in her for almost a year. Happy days!If my memory is correct the "Chippy" the trip I did in the "Newcastle" was a guy from Kent who had spent many years in the RN.There was a strong Hebridean contingent on the "Hobart", all but 2 of the deck crowd,(I think), being from Barra.
Rob Randle aka "Henry"

A few McNiel's on board then?(Thumb)

Newcastle Star
30th April 2007, 14:43
Hi Hugh,

My next experience after leaving the Newcastle Star was working for Siemens/AEI in Woolwich. Being the ex R/O, I was sent onboard her to calibrate the D/F off Dover then down that same ladder onto the pilot boat. Bit hairy as it was blowing a bit but thankfully the ice age has passed.

Neil McInnes
7th July 2007, 02:30
I think Archie MacKinnon from Barra may have been the bosun at that time

Paul Sibellas
22nd July 2010, 11:49
I was on the "Newcastle Star" as EDH on a voyage to Aussie 1968.As stated ,it was one of the ships i was on that had no radar.I was on the wheel when the pilot boarded in an Ausralian port & Capt King told him we had no radar,the piot said,"Is it not woking",the old man replied,"No,we just have no radar".Capt.King was a kill joy not wanting women on board on the Aussie coast & not letting us have bar ect.but besides him we had a great crew & did have woman on board,the mates gave us passes any way,Capt king when he knew females were onboard,told the mates to make sure any woman on board were off by 11pm.,but they never enforced it.I have a photo of the ship passing the Sydney Opera house when it was still not quite finished.The bosun was a Gordie called Peter.