two of fat one of lean

jim brindley
2nd May 2007, 09:45
many years ago it was harsons of liverpool were hungry ships any i shiptout one the facktor .she turnedoutbe to the best i was ever on .got back to liverpool told mate i would be back to sign on again but i got sidetracked .and went elswhere ,cheers to all old jim the pom in oz .sorry lads i do my best.(Thumb)

Bill Lambert
2nd May 2007, 17:54
I sailed on the "Factor" in 1967 & again in 1970. Last November at the Adelphi in Liverpool, we had a reunion of former Harrison men. I met up with at least 5 former Factorites. She was a great ship, just that little something that made her a bit special.

jim brindley
3rd May 2007, 09:17
thanks bill you made my day.glad to hear she was still around 1967 1970,i was a.b. in her 1950 .old sinner jim in oz .your right she was a great ship.

lofty
3rd May 2007, 16:28
Hiya Jim I done three trips on the Factor 1959/1960 as mess room steward she was a good and happy ship and no matter how bad the weather I always felt safe and sound on her and by the way she was an excellant feeder cheers lofty

jim brindley
4th May 2007, 01:59
hi lofty she was allso pleasure to steer .cheers jim old sinner.

Allan Wareing
4th May 2007, 11:43
many years ago it was harsons of liverpool were hungry ships any i shiptout one the facktor .she turnedoutbe to the best i was ever on .got back to liverpool told mate i would be back to sign on again but i got sidetracked .and went elswhere ,cheers to all old jim the pom in oz .sorry lads i do my best.(Thumb)

Two of fat and one of lean brings back happy memories.
Made 4 trips as 3rd mate in the Comedian, one of the old coal-burners in 1949/50.
"Twin Screw" Wells was Master (So called because had just become the father of twins). Left her and did one trip in the Planter - what a joy to get away from the coal-dust and ashes. Both of them were very good feeders.
Dream on, Allan.

Keith Adams
6th May 2007, 05:07
Harrisons had such good conditions, food, reliefs,etc.. they were known as the Married Man's Company in the late 1950s ... one had to have a 1st Mates ticket to even get a 3rd Mates berth on a WWll Liberty of which I think they had 10 at the time ... served on the "Scholar" ex "Samidway" 3 trips in 1960 and proud of it. Snowy

Hague
6th May 2007, 10:41
Snowy,
Harrisons were similar to Alfred Holt in this respect.
4th Mate : Second Mates (FG)
3rd Mate : First Mates (FG)
2nd Mate : Master's (FG)
Ch.Off : Approx 5 year as Second Mate
Master : Approx 12 years as Ch.Off ( 45 was the average age for command)

makko
7th May 2007, 15:06
Hague,

And it was the same on the engineering side: Many 4/E's already had their Chiefs!

Rgds.

Dave

Keith Adams
7th May 2007, 16:09
They were great ships to sail on in peacetime (wartime fittings removed, etc.); I particularily liked the bunks !... lots of room compared to British ships, however, in heavy weather one had to cant the mattress up toward the bulkhead in order to sleep in place. Happy times ... I must also say that the Barbados crew members were the best all round guys I ever sailed with. Snowy

stan mayes
2nd June 2007, 20:58
Hello Snowy,
Re bunks in Liberty ships...Deck Dept..
I presume all cabins for seamen were in starboard alleyway as built,but it seems that some companies made changes after they were bought postwar...
In SAMPEP we were three to a cabin and the Bosun and Chippy were in a double berth cabin on aft end of the alleyway..
In CITY of ELY ex SAMARINA we were three to a cabin [ four bunks to a cabin as in SAMPEP ] The Donkeyman had the end cabin and the Bosun and Chippy had separate cabins on the poop - as you know that was the gunners quarters during the war...
I visited JEREMIAH O'BRIEN in Chatham Docks when she was over here for the Normandy anniversary but the accomodation area was out of bounds so I did not see how the cabins were - I think they must be as originally built..
Your voluntary work on that old timer is praiseworthy Snowy.
Stan...

stan mayes
2nd June 2007, 21:09
Liberty ships,
Another thing with those ships is that No 3 derricks were crossed when in the crutches,also there was a jumbo at No 2 with two derricks..Many companies who bought them added another two derricks to aft end of No2...

boats
3rd June 2007, 21:52
I visited JEREMIAH O'BRIEN in Chatham Docks when she was over here for the Normandy anniversary but the accomodation area was out of bounds so I did not see how the cabins were - I think they must be as originally built..
Stan...

I was on the JOB that trip. AB 1st half, bosn 2nd half. Here is a picture of the JOB in Chatam. The smoothest water I've ever seen. The passageways were always open to visitors. But as all the fo'c's'les were occupied the doors were usually shut. Sorry about that.
http://www.geocities.com/jeremiahobrien/jo5.jpg

stan mayes
4th June 2007, 00:57
I was on the JOB that trip. AB 1st half, bosn 2nd half. Here is a picture of the JOB in Chatam. The smoothest water I've ever seen. The passageways were always open to visitors. But as all the fo'c's'les were occupied the doors were usually shut. Sorry about that.
http://www.geocities.com/jeremiahobrien/jo5.jpg
Hello Boats,
I was on JOB at Chatham for four hours and as you say the passageways were open but cabin doors closed [that is expected as they were occupied]..
I talked with many of the crew,maybe had a word with you also..I showed the 2nd Mate my Seamans Discharge Book and he gave me a WW2 Sea Veterans Badge...I treasure it...
I took many photos of the ship from inboard and shoreside including passing Gravesend outward bound .. I am critical of the ship having two gangways outboard on the starboard side when they should have been turned in and secured after sailing from London..one hour before!.
For yourself,Snowy and all the other volunteer crews you deserve much praise for maintaining that ship in such a pristine condition..

Keith Adams
8th June 2007, 07:19
Hi once again Stan... we appreciate your comments and observations of our ship "Jeremiah O'Brien" ... I have been a member of "JOB"for many, many years but am only in my second year as a crew member, whereas "Boat" has been a crew member "forever" as they say, and is still our long suffering Bosun at this time. The ship only has one original Gangway and that is rigged on the Starboard side ( one day we will get around to spending funds for one on the Port side) ... in order to board and land passengers/visitors expeditiously, we have a larger (ex-Navy) gangway rigged abreast of No.4 starboard ( can board/land 2 abreast as it is almost twice as wide as the standard one...it has to lead forward since we lift and land heavy and/or cumbersome equipment at No.5, such as a 25 ft long mobile bar-b-que or a heavy mobile air compressor.To avoid conjestion on the pier/dock landing, we swung the main gangway around to also lead forward; it is secured alongside No.3 starboard. If expecting really heavy weather on the coast or on rare trips deep sea, we have to unship the No.4 gangway and secure it on deck abreast of No.4 and the main gangway has to be swung back to lead aft before it can be it can properly housed ... a lot of messing about when visitors expect to be able to board and/or land as soon as we are tied up and most don't even want to wait for that ! Actually, if they would just hold back a while, they would witness the most fun part of the day trip, which is to watch we bunch of old farts throwing heaving lines and handling moorings ! which we don't get to do a lot of on a regular basis, especially when many of the crew a just enthusiastic beginners ... "Boats" almost disappearing through a fairlead with his foot on the line when he asks for a bit more slack and gets the whole lot at once ! Or myself forgetting about the fwd gun-deck stantions being in the way of a clear lead when taking a mooring rope to the drum-end
... I agree Stan, it doesn't look good or seamanlike but that is how it is for us at the moment and it means we always have to tie up starboard side to... I also hate steaming with derricks/booms raised and all in seeming disaray, however we need the hatch tops clear for passengers to sit and/or move about and it looks "alive" for photographs ...so they say. Cheers to one who has forgotton more seamanship stuff than most of us will ever learn, Snowy.

stan mayes
8th June 2007, 12:06
Hello Snowy,
You have given a good and expertly explained explanation to my stupid criticism..I should know better than to think that seamanship ended when I left the sea...My humble apologies to you and all the volunteers who help to maintain JOB..
I am sure that your explanation of the use of the gangways will be of interest to other members..Stan

Keith Adams
9th June 2007, 06:57
Hi again Stan... forgot to mention that the reason we dont load anything but stores and engine room supplies at No.4 on the "J.O.B." is we have a small Reefer container sitting on the port half of the hatch-top and a 20 ft Generator on the starboard half of No.4 ... we only have steam up one weekend a month (except when we are Cruising) and need the generator for emergency power, and the box reefer is cheaper to operate than the ships own reefer storage spaces at tween deck level in the main accomodation ... method in our madness ! We have a similar generator set up in No.4 Tween Deck port side, and even though it has been there for well over a year we still haven't gained government approval to fire it up and rid ourselves of the one on No.4 hatchtop ... Lord knows when that will happen as we really need the hatch-top space to seat passengers ... something to do with installing it without first obtaining ALL of the neccessary sign offs. For those interested ... daily operation of normal steam powered deck machinery, when the Engine Room is shut down (most of the time), is accomplished by means a gasolene/petrol powered air compressor, which pushes compressed air through the steam pipe system ... that unit sits on deck on the stb. side of No.5 and is landed on the dock to free up deck space when on Cruises and normal steam power is available on deck. Our latest project of major importance, is the procurement and installation of a large fibreglass sceptic waste holding tank in No. 4 or No. 3 Lower Hold as we can no longer use the tank space we had taken for that purpose ... you may remember that such waste routinely went directly from the heads over the side, and in port, we rigged heavy wooden baffle boards over each outlet scupper to ensure waste didn't shoot out onto the dock/pier, gangway, barge,or whatever ... gone also are the "Thunder Boxes" we used to rig over the stern for Stevedor use in undeveloped ports or when working at anchor... most cargo ships were not built with sceptic waste holding tanks until the 1950s. I would add that we are scheduled for a 7 day drydock in San Francisco beginning June 18th, 2007 ... about a week from now ... to save money we will be sharing the dock with
some barges. "boats", a Shipsnostalgia member has a really neat photo of the "J.O.B." on this site of one of her previous drydockings. Cheers, Snowy
"He does go on, doesn't he!?"

stan mayes
9th June 2007, 15:52
Thankyou again Snowy for all the interesting information..
Your term of baffle boards had me baffled,then I realized you meant s..t chutes,those unsightly things hung accross the waste outlets on the ships sides......Best wishes Stan

Keith Adams
10th June 2007, 05:42
Stan, I was trying to be polite ! Best to to you, Keith (Snowy)