Final Voyages

railroadbill
14th May 2007, 20:48
The 70's saw the majority of 'Oceans' fleet decimated, particularly after the fuel crisis late '73 early '74.
Kaohshiung and other breakers yards were very busy to say the least.
Looking through my discharge books, I was on a few ships that ended their days with 'Ocean'.

M.V. RHEXENOR after a final voyage to Australia, we proceded with the final cargo back to Singapore and for the final off-loading of company property & paperwork. The ships name was changed to M.V. Hexeno and we later proceded to Kaohshiung breakers yard and left the ship (after payment was cleared) on 23/05/75. I noticed also among those ships waiting for the cutters torch at Kaohshiung was the Gunung Djati, however I feel that this ship escaped the torch because I saw her back in service at a later date in the Far East still looking good.

M.V. GLENOGLE after her final discharge in the UK, we proceded from Immingham to Rotterdam where she was handed over to her new owners on 30/09/77 and was renamed to something like Aitodor.

M.V.MEMNON I sailed on this fine ship on the Blue Sea Service USA/Far East & Indonesia from 18/08/71 to 19/05/72. Later on to West Africa under the Elder Dempster funnel renamed as M.V.OWERRI. The ship got a battering loading unfamiliar cargo such as logs. After our arrival back to Tilbury on 14/04/78 we were told that she had been sold for further trading. Very sad.

M.V. ANCHISES & M.V.AJAX as mentioned in an earlier thread, these Bulkers got sold for further trading 21/12/83 and 27/03/84 respectively. These were the last two showing the AH Blue Funnel.(Thumb)

Hague
14th May 2007, 22:05
Understand how you feel. I felt the changes in 67 and got out with fond memories.

Trevorw
14th May 2007, 23:18
Did the same in '65, but it still 'guts' me when I think what they were! My last ship was "Glenfalloch" - God, she was a beauty!

Hague
14th May 2007, 23:32
Never sailed in the Glen Line although I visited many out East. The 'Glenogle' class whilst a new design but still managed to maintained the distinctive 'China' design. Almost like a natural progression.

makko
15th May 2007, 05:00
My first ship was the Phrontis ex-Pembrokeshire. Since I had seen the real thing and the model in Slatey Road Art gallery, I wanted to be on a Bluey - just like my Dad and Grandfather. For me it was a dream come true. It was a shame though that it was her last voyage - Laid up in Singapore Roads, shaft tunnel flooded no air-con or fresh water and buyers coming aboard.

regards,

Dave

quietman
15th May 2007, 18:03
Did my first proper voyage on the autolycus. Call it the first proper one as my first trip was on Oriana good memories but no real seamanship skills. After being with Blue Funnel for a couple of voyages and several coastal trips I was ready for anything the pool could throw at me.

Graham McMorine
18th May 2007, 23:06
Understand how you feel. I felt the changes in 67 and got out with fond memories.

Know what you all mean, got out in 67, last ship being Pembrokeshire. If only steps could be retraced !(Thumb)

raypawlowski
21st May 2007, 11:22
The good old days, I sailed on the Aeneas for three voyages befor taking her to the breakers in Taiwan, hard work buut a happy ship. My next trip was to take the Peleus to the same breakers yard. On returning home I was asked to join another ship on its way to the breakers but I declined the offer and sighned on the Glenlyon where I stayed for four or five trips, another happy ship.

kevinseery
29th July 2007, 13:42
Automedon went to scrap in Kaohshiung after being damaged in collision with a Greek ship (San George) in the River Scheldt off Flushing. It was my first trip after passing 2nd mates. We were sent to South Shields for repairs and spent Christmas there (1971) before sailing out to Indonesia then, briefly, Hong Kong and on to Taiwan. Captain was I.D.Jackson who didn't seem to have much luck, he was old man on Calchas when she caught fire and was gutted in Port Kelang a couple of years later. Happy days(K) (K)

RGascoyne
29th July 2007, 14:18
I sailed the very last regular voyages on my first two ships, both in 1965, the Stirling and Braemar Castles. I am glad I was able to do that, they were great and beautiful ships, and although only at sea three years, UCL's passenger fleet halved itself in my days, down from 12 liners.

Tai Pan
2nd August 2007, 10:47
My last deep sea was on Glengarry, now that was a ship, what say you Trevor

Trevorw
20th August 2007, 23:28
I left Blue Funnel in 1965 and came ashore. In retrospect, it was a good move, particularly as I was an R/O.
Were any of you ex Blue Flu'Sparkies at their demise, and if so, what happened to you?

kradford
3rd September 2007, 00:43
I did my first 3 FG trips on the Autolycus 72-73

Bill Davies
6th September 2007, 13:14
First trip as Deck Boy in 'Memnon' ( 08/55 - 07/56) signed off as JOS.

hwyliwr
1st October 2009, 20:03
I was on the Alcinous for her final voyage, we left Liverpool fully laden with Hong Kong being the final discharging port on the third of September 1974, all the goodies were stripped off the ship then a skeleton crew took her to Taiwan to be scrapped, the remainder of us were put in a hotel in Kowloon to wait for the rest to return from Taiwan then we all flew home together, that was my last conventional ship, after that it was those horrible box boats under OCL colours.

Hugh Ferguson
3rd October 2009, 21:03
I think all who have contributed to this thread should seriously consider treating themselves to a book which I rarely ever hear mention made.
The title is:- In Time of War, but it is in fact not just the war-time history of the ship, it is a highly detailed account of the entire life of that ship, the Glenearn, from construction to demolition.

The author was Alex Aiken and the book was written to commemorate his father who died in a tragic accident at the time when he was her Chief Engineer. Alex himself died some six years ago and his widow, Janet, is offering copies of the book at a modest £18. I can guarantee that, if you decide to purchase a copy, you will be more than satisfied.
If anyone should wish to contact Janet (she lives in Glasgow) to learn more, send me a PM and I will give you her address and telephone number.

Bill Davies
4th October 2009, 14:59
It is with deep regret that I have to inform fellow 'China Boat men' the passing of Dick Williams, AB from Edern on the Lleyn peninsular. Dick died recently at the age of 80 and was a well known and much respected sailor in Holts from just after the last war until retirement.
On a personal note, I sailed with Dick in the late 50s. ABs together, he was forever taunting me about my studies albeit in a positive manner.
Last time I saw Dick was in 65 when I was Mate of one of Jacobs Ore Carriers discharging at the Bidston Dock Birkenhead and he just knocked on my door extended his hand and said ‘ I always knew you would do it’. That meant a lot coming from a man I had enormous respect for.


Bill Davies

rothesian
4th October 2009, 20:36
Sailed with Dick 1964 on Maron - he was a ldg seaman at the time

Trader
4th October 2009, 23:27
It is with deep regret that I have to inform fellow 'China Boat men' the passing of Dick Williams, AB from Edern on the Lleyn peninsular. Dick died recently at the age of 80 and was a well known and much respected sailor in Holts from just after the last war until retirement.
On a personal note, I sailed with Dick in the late 50s. ABs together, he was forever taunting me about my studies albeit in a positive manner.
Last time I saw Dick was in 65 when I was Mate of one of Jacobs Ore Carriers discharging at the Bidston Dock Birkenhead and he just knocked on my door extended his hand and said ‘ I always knew you would do it’. That meant a lot coming from a man I had enormous respect for.


Bill Davies

Bill,

I sailed with a Dick Williams from Pwlleli on the Bellerophon when I was a deck boy in 1952. It must be the same Dick Williams. He was in his early twenties then and very concerned about losing his hair and used to try lots of remedies such as rubbing a raw onion in his scalp and also rubbing palm oil in his hair.

He got the palm oil from the Middies after they had taken the daily temperatures with the chain sounding line, the chain was coiled into a bucket and a little oil accumulated in it which Dick used.

He was good with the palm and needle and taught me how to patch dungarees.

R.I.P Dick.

Alec.

jmcg
10th October 2009, 11:07
I seem to recall Dick as LS on Antilochus with Tony Casson as bosun. A good crowd. Only did one trip on her and rejoined Hector.

Farewell.

John

hwyliwr
15th October 2009, 20:16
Dick was well known in Blue Flu as a great shipmate and character, I sailed with him and I live in the village of Edern where he was born, It was great to see so many of his old friends travel some distance to attend his funeral, we had a drink and a chat about the old days afterwards, Dick would have been made up with the turnout, his family wish to thank you all for your kindness. stan.