Anyone sail with Captain Pem?

sparkie2182
16th May 2007, 23:14
captain pembridge???????????

Philthechill
17th May 2007, 06:55
I sailed with Pem, as S3E, on both the "Maipura" and "Mangla". He was an absolute gentleman and probably the best skipper I ever sailed with. I was extremely saddened to hear of his death. I'm quite certain that any other replies you get to this query will all be in the same vein as mine. Great skipper and a great bloke.

non descript
17th May 2007, 07:51
Phil, what a very pleasant and kind posting. Thank you. (Applause)

Nova Scotian
17th May 2007, 10:15
I sailed with Pem', as 2/0, on the Cunard Carronade in 1973/4. Excellent Master and respected by all on board. He possessed a great sense of humour and was, without a doubt, one of the fairest Masters I had the good fortune to sail with. I believe I have posted a thumbnail of him under Cunard Brocklebank Bulkers.

Cheers

sparkie2182
17th May 2007, 21:24
a pleasant and kind posting..................


and bang on.


captain pem was a seagoing gentleman. i remember he lived in the hereford area.........but did not know of his death. deeply saddened, sad loss.

Philthechill
18th May 2007, 10:57
Further to my remarks about Pem and what a complete gentleman he was, another contender for "All-round excellent skipper and good bloke" would have to be "Paddy" Jackson. I sailed with him on both "Makrana" and "Mangla". One particular "Paddyism" was that he would always thank whoever was on the engine-controls after "Finished with Engines" had been rung. I remember one particular time when we were entering KG V in Cal. I always took great pride in my manouevering and tried to answer the telegraph's commands as quickly as possible. However, on the water-tube boilered ships like "Mangla", too enthusiastic a shutting of the "Ahead" steam, or "Astern" for that matter, could result in a rapid lowering of the water-level in the steam-drum with, if you weren't careful, a low-water-level trip being enabled. I prided myself in being able to keep the water-level at "half-a-glass", (as displayed in the remote-reading Igema), no matter how rapid the demands from the telegraph. However on the particular occasion I am thinking about the barge traffic was much more than normal (if that was possible!!) and I was sorely tried to keep-up with the "Full Ahead/Stop/Slow Astern/Full Astern/Double Full Astern/Stop/Full Ahead/Stop/Dead Slow Astern/Stop etc. etc. etc." that were being rung ever more rapidly on Mr. Chadburns invention. Eventually all the mayhem subsided into more normal "requests" and we got "Finished with Engines" followed by getting shut-down. "Paddy" rang down to thank "whoever it was manouvering as we had come very close to sinking a couple of barges that were meandering around in the dock and to accept his apologies for the rapidity of the telegraph commands". A wonderful skipper and gentleman.

tedc
18th May 2007, 16:14
captain pembridge???????????

Yes, He was Captain of the Mahout in 1959. My wife came on that trip which was our first deep sea after our marriage.

In those days wives had only just been approved to travel with officers (R/Os were among the earliest!) and, since conditions on the Mahout were all male oriented, Pem needed a lot of tact & diplomacy - which he had in spades.

Pem was the perfect Gentleman and my wife remembers him with affection as much as I.

Roger Bentley
18th May 2007, 16:59
I agree entirely with the remarks re Pem, he was the best. Last year on a P & O Cruise I noted that the captain was called Pembridge. I contacted him wondering if he was any relation. He wasn't but told me that all his relations came from the Hereford area as the name originates there. I am pleased to say relative of Pem or not he exhibited the same politeness and kindly attention. I also got the impression that the Artemis was a happy ship. Salaams, Roger Bentley

Tony Sprigings
18th May 2007, 19:05
I will always have very fond memories of Pem. He was the Second Mate of the Magdapur when I was Apprentice (circa 1946/7)and I used to be on watch with him.
We had passengers at the time (60 of them) and he used to send me down to make the tea in the middle watch. I used to take about half an hour to brew the tea because I had a girl friend amongst the passengers. He used to ask why the tea took so long to be produced and I would tell him that the Engineers had just emptied the boiler and I had to refill it from cold. I know that he never believed me but he was always very kind. (With apologies to all my engineering friends for taking their names in vain) All's fair.....as they say!

Don A.Macleod
18th May 2007, 21:24
captain pembridge???????????

Coasted the MAIPURA for nearly 2 months in June/july 65 and a tale to tell!
We had two QM's(Murdo and Willie) who rejoined in Middlesbro' after their leave.We proceeded on our coastal voyage round the usual contintal ports with the customary visits to various watering holes!
During this trip our QM'S were sacked by the master(they were always misbehaving!in his opinion! ) and this did not appeal to him'.So they were to be permanently discharged upon arrival back in the UK.
Due to the long coastal, continuing deep staff rejoined. "Pem" saw red when he learned that two of his QMs were no longer "ships company"
This was soon rectified and Murdo and Willie were "reinstated" for continuing deep sea going duties.
As Phil will confirm they were still there with us in 67.
In the couple of weeks I was there with him he was so friendly and always stopped for a chat, a gentleman to the core.A pleasure to have met him.

Jim S
18th May 2007, 22:20
My last coastal voyage with Brocklebank was as 3/E on Maipura signed on at Glasgow on 27th Aug 1967 - signed off at Tilbury on 28th September.
Capt Pembridge was the master according to my Discharge Book but unfortunately with all the good things said about him I have no recollection of him.

Philthechill
18th May 2007, 23:06
Coasted the MAIPURA for nearly 2 months in June/july 65 and a tale to tell!
We had two QM's(Murdo and Willie) who rejoined in Middlesbro' after their leave.We proceeded on our coastal voyage round the usual contintal ports with the customary visits to various watering holes!
During this trip our QM'S were sacked by the master(they were always misbehaving!in his opinion! ) and this did not appeal to him'.So they were to be permanently discharged upon arrival back in the UK.
Due to the long coastal, continuing deep staff rejoined. "Pem" saw red when he learned that two of his QMs were no longer "ships company"
This was soon rectified and Murdo and Willie were "reinstated" for continuing deep sea going duties.
As Phil will confirm they were still there with us in 67.
In the couple of weeks I was there with him he was so friendly and always stopped for a chat, a gentleman to the core.A pleasure to have met him. When I saw the names "Murdo and Willie" I was transported back in time to "Maipura". They were such wonderful characters and I can see them now! Murdo with his very short haircut and little Willie in his "Empire-building" shorts! They were both from Stornoway, I believe, and had the beautiful "soft" accent associated with that neck-of-the-woods. I have a ships bell I "relieved" from a wreck in Jeddah which Murdo decorated with a bell-rope. The very intricate "Turks Head" he made is an everlasting tribute to long-lost (I suspect) skills. Fabulous days! Salaams, Phil

Don A.Macleod
18th May 2007, 23:50
When I saw the names "Murdo and Willie" I was transported back in time to "Maipura". They were such wonderful characters and I can see them now! Murdo with his very short haircut and little Willie in his "Empire-building" shorts! They were both from Stornoway, I believe, and had the beautiful "soft" accent associated with that neck-of-the-woods. I have a ships bell I "relieved" from a wreck in Jeddah which Murdo decorated with a bell-rope. The very intricate "Turks Head" he made is an everlasting tribute to long-lost (I suspect) skills. Fabulous days! Salaams, Phil

Ah! Phil there is more to tell about Murdo and the "bell". More to follow tomorrow.Don.

Philthechill
19th May 2007, 12:38
Oh Gawd Don. THAT sounds a bit ominous!!!

Jim S
19th May 2007, 17:17
I will always have very fond memories of Pem. He was the Second Mate of the Magdapur when I was Apprentice (circa 1946/7)and I used to be on watch with him.
We had passengers at the time (60 of them) and he used to send me down to make the tea in the middle watch. I used to take about half an hour to brew the tea because I had a girl friend amongst the passengers. He used to ask why the tea took so long to be produced and I would tell him that the Engineers had just emptied the boiler and I had to refill it from cold. I know that he never believed me but he was always very kind. (With apologies to all my engineering friends for taking their names in vain) All's fair.....as they say!

Tony,
Where did you accommodate 60 passengers on Magdapur?
The only time we had more than 6 passengers was as per attached photo.
Despite their big brown eyes - did not fancy any of them.

Tony Sprigings
19th May 2007, 19:19
Jim,
Immediately after the War both the Manipur and Magdapur had to comply with the Ministry of War Transport requirements by providing accomodation for passengers so that the outposts could be serviced once again.
The accomodation on both those ships was situated in the Bridge Deck. It ran from the Bridge Front to the after end of that deck and were laid out with Males on the Starboard side and Females on the Port side. The cabins consisted of six and four berth rooms. You can imagine that on a trip to India or for that matter to the States from India a few problems occured when the married couples wished to spend 'private' time together. One of my jobs on the 12-4 night watch was to ensure that they stayed within the guard rails on the boat deck because it tended to get a bit crowded!
The accomodation was all ripped out after a couple of years and became cargo space and known as No.3 Bridge Deck

Jim S
19th May 2007, 20:02
Tony,
Thanks for that explanation - Do you have a photo of her (Magadapur, not the girl friend) in that configuration? It must have been quite an ordeal providing for all these souls on board plus the ship's company.
I guess water rationing was a regular feature of those voyages.

Tony Sprigings
19th May 2007, 21:20
Jim,
The ship looked much the same as she did latterly except for a row of portholes on either side which were blanked off after the conversion. The portholes sat just between the white paint on the apron of the saloon deck and the white band that ran all round the vessel.
We carried extra crew to supply stewards for the passengers and also extra cooks. The public rooms sat across the fore part beneath the Officer's saloon and consisted of a lounge and a saloon for their use only.
As you say water supply was a big problem because it was before the days of low pressure evaporators. Water rationing began as soon as we left port and clothes washing as strictly controlled.
Mind you in those days no one expected much water to be available so there was never any complaints.

R798780
19th May 2007, 21:32
Tony, do I assume that war time tonnage - Malakand - which I sailed on - Martand, etc, were also rigged for this trade, or was that space used only for the gun crews? Or was it just the immediate post war tonnage, the black four, with it's "A/C".

Jim S
19th May 2007, 22:13
Tony,
Thanks again, I have to admit I was having problems visualising the arrangement but you have made it clearer. After the removal of this aditional accommodation she would have had the port and starboard alleyways that I remember - The Quartermasters and Chippy acommodation on Port side and engine room working alleyway/storage space on Starboard side.

Tony Sprigings
20th May 2007, 09:36
Hugh, It was the tonnage that was built immediately after the war that had the extra accom. fitted. All the pre-war ships were modified by having DEMS Accom. fitted into the 'tween' decks. I believe it was only the 'black' four that had this passenger accom. fitted and it was only used for a couple of years, until air transport became the norm.

Tony Sprigings
20th May 2007, 09:57
Jim, The accom. for the Chippy and Q.M.'s on the Port side and the Engine room working alleyway/storage space on the starboard side remained, as built but it was forward of those alleyways that the Passenger Accom. existed. After the conversion the trunking for No.3 Tween deck was cut away to open up the space and produce what became known as the Bridge Deck. Does that make sense to you? It is difficult to explain.

Jim S
20th May 2007, 15:23
Jim, The accom. for the Chippy and Q.M.'s on the Port side and the Engine room working alleyway/storage space on the starboard side remained, as built but it was forward of those alleyways that the Passenger Accom. existed. After the conversion the trunking for No.3 Tween deck was cut away to open up the space and produce what became known as the Bridge Deck. Does that make sense to you? It is difficult to explain.

Tony,

I think I have an understanding of the layout now. - Perhaps I should have paid a bit more attentiion at the time of sailing on Magdapur but the conversion seemed to have left little or no clues to previous usage and I never heard any reference to such a feature in her earlier life.

Thanks again

Jim

Tony Sprigings
20th May 2007, 18:33
Jim, Glad to have been of service. The conversion was very thorough and left no trace of previous use. To be fair it had only been fitted as temporary accom. and I am sure that it was a simple job to strip it all out again. I have a feeling that it was done in Port Glasgow.
Some of the last passengers we had were a bunch of Missionaries from Calcutta to the States. Not the most inspiring folk I have ever met!

Don A.Macleod
23rd May 2007, 14:38
Oh Gawd Don. THAT sounds a bit ominous!!!

Catching up Phil,just back from Stornoway at the weekend(Paradise!).
As your geographical knowledge is rather limited,I suggest you seek your 6year old grand daughters help in assisting you!
Lewis and Harris are the same island(bit like Scotland and England!)
Stornoway is the "capital" of Lewis whilst Tarbert is the capital of Harris.
Murdo came from Harris and Wiliie came from Barra many miles to the south.
They were a couple of characters without a doubt.
There was a tendency for Western Islanders to say they came from Stornoway, myself included.
Will come back on the "bell" story in relation to Murdo and his time on MAIPURA. Salaams

Donald

Derek Roger
23rd May 2007, 15:48
Coasted the MAIPURA for nearly 2 months in June/july 65 and a tale to tell!
We had two QM's(Murdo and Willie) who rejoined in Middlesbro' after their leave.We proceeded on our coastal voyage round the usual contintal ports with the customary visits to various watering holes!
During this trip our QM'S were sacked by the master(they were always misbehaving!in his opinion! ) and this did not appeal to him'.So they were to be permanently discharged upon arrival back in the UK.
Due to the long coastal, continuing deep staff rejoined. "Pem" saw red when he learned that two of his QMs were no longer "ships company"
This was soon rectified and Murdo and Willie were "reinstated" for continuing deep sea going duties.
As Phil will confirm they were still there with us in 67.
In the couple of weeks I was there with him he was so friendly and always stopped for a chat, a gentleman to the core.A pleasure to have met him.


I joined the Maipura 22 July as engineer apprentice for my first trip deep sea . Pem was the Old Man Taff Roberts the Mate and Derek Peters 2nd mate QMs were Murdo MacLeod Willie Mc Kay and a big Cockney " Charlie "
You must have been relieved by Harry Allison as he was Lecky .
Chief was Pat Morris ; 2nd John Bateman ;3rd John Hutchison ( Chief with Ropners doing his steam time with Brocks ) Jun 3rd John Batty ; 4 the Eng Ray Palfreeman ; 5th John Smith myself and Paddy ( Martin ) Clarke as Engineer apprentices . Cant remember the 3rd mate or deck apprentices names although I have a photo somewhere taken in Trincas in Calcutta.
Harry Jefferson was Sparks ( forget the 2nd Sparks name and also the Chippie?) Ben Fennimore was the Chief Steward and Mike Voisey was 2 nd Steward .
Murdo was also the ships barber at 2 cans of Tennants a shot .


The 2nd Sparks was 18 and allowed beer while apprentices were not ! Having done a reverse phase 3 at Stow before going deep sea I was 20 ! After being egged on by the Engineers I approacked Pem when we were in Gan Island explained the situation and requested a beer ration which he readily agreed too ! He allowed all the apprentices a beer ration and I instantly became a hero to my Peers .

Derek

Derek Roger
23rd May 2007, 15:59
Grey matter is coming alive again ; 2 nd Sparks on Maipura in 65 was Pete Madden . and I think the 3rd Mate was Alex Pritchard .

Don A.Macleod
24th May 2007, 18:07
I joined the Maipura 22 July as engineer apprentice for my first trip deep sea . Pem was the Old Man Taff Roberts the Mate and Derek Peters 2nd mate QMs were Murdo MacLeod Willie Mc Kay and a big Cockney " Charlie "
You must have been relieved by Harry Allison as he was Lecky .
Chief was Pat Morris ; 2nd John Bateman ;3rd John Hutchison ( Chief with Ropners doing his steam time with Brocks ) Jun 3rd John Batty ; 4 the Eng Ray Palfreeman ; 5th John Smith myself and Paddy ( Martin ) Clarke as Engineer apprentices . Cant remember the 3rd mate or deck apprentices names although I have a photo somewhere taken in Trincas in Calcutta.
Harry Jefferson was Sparks ( forget the 2nd Sparks name and also the Chippie?) Ben Fennimore was the Chief Steward and Mike Voisey was 2 nd Steward .
Murdo was also the ships barber at 2 cans of Tennants a shot .


The 2nd Sparks was 18 and allowed beer while apprentices were not ! Having done a reverse phase 3 at Stow before going deep sea I was 20 ! After being egged on by the Engineers I approacked Pem when we were in Gan Island explained the situation and requested a beer ration which he readily agreed too ! He allowed all the apprentices a beer ration and I instantly became a hero to my Peers .

Derek

Old names again Derek,brings back memories.Signed off on 19th July and Harry would have rejoined as lecky(that was his ship).
Re the QM's they were Murdo Mackay and Willie Macneil a great pair!
Was on MAHOUT with Martin(4th eng)in 68 a very nice guy.(mad Irishman!)
Knew Alex Pritchard very well as we coasted with each other for quite a while on various ships.(Eric Lorimer was always there,do you recollect him?)
He knew every ship "down below" and was an asset to the company no doubt when ships came in from deepsea.

Regarding Pem. I can imagine he would have responded to your request very positively. That was the impression I got of him.I'm sure you had a good trip with him.
Donald

Derek Roger
25th May 2007, 23:01
Old names again Derek,brings back memories.Signed off on 19th July and Harry would have rejoined as lecky(that was his ship).
Re the QM's they were Murdo Mackay and Willie Macneil a great pair!
Was on MAHOUT with Martin(4th eng)in 68 a very nice guy.(mad Irishman!)
Knew Alex Pritchard very well as we coasted with each other for quite a while on various ships.(Eric Lorimer was always there,do you recollect him?)
He knew every ship "down below" and was an asset to the company no doubt when ships came in from deepsea.

Regarding Pem. I can imagine he would have responded to your request very positively. That was the impression I got of him.I'm sure you had a good trip with him.
Donald

Sailed with Eric Lorimer on the coast a couple of times . I seem to recollect he was from Dundee.
As you suggest Pem was a " Gem " Very well respected .
and he was happy to let Taffy Roberts to do all the work ! Which Taff seemed to enjoy .

Don A.Macleod
26th May 2007, 00:31
Sailed with Eric Lorimer on the coast a couple of times . I seem to recollect he was from Dundee.
As you suggest Pem was a " Gem " Very well respected .
and he was happy to let Taffy Roberts to do all the work ! Which Taff seemed to enjoy .

Eric Lorimer
He was indeed from Dundee Derek.A Prof. 3rd but knew every" steamer" inside out.

Philthechill
26th May 2007, 08:12
Eric Lorimer
He was indeed from Dundee Derek.A Prof. 3rd but knew every" steamer" inside out. I am one of the rarer of the engineering species, Don. I actually sailed deep-sea with Eric!!! Not many people can say THAT! Eric seemed to be on permanent coasting duties and was the envy of quite a number of Engineers who would have appreciated a month, or several, 'going round the land'. I tried it on with 'Mr. Fraser', quoting one of my relatives as having some obscure life-threatening disease but, Mr. Fraser probably having written every medical excuse known to man would only say, "Unless it is your Mother, Father or wife, who has been struck-down with leprosy, I'm afraid I cannot grant your request therefore I would appreciate it if you joined "Malnutrition", (or whatever ship he was attempting to staff), in Tilbury on ------" and leave it at that You could virtually guarantee the bloke you would be relieving would be Eric which would make you feel even more hard-done by!!!. I can't recall which ship I went deep-sea on with Eric but everyone commented on the fact that he was actually being prised away from coasting, making comments about his not being able to cope once we had lost sight of land etc. etc. However he turned-out to be just as good fun deep-sea as he was coasting. Salaams

Don A.Macleod
26th May 2007, 09:32
I am one of the rarer of the engineering species, Don. I actually sailed deep-sea with Eric!!! Not many people can say THAT! Eric seemed to be on permanent coasting duties and was the envy of quite a number of Engineers who would have appreciated a month, or several, 'going round the land'. I tried it on with 'Mr. Fraser', quoting one of my relatives as having some obscure life-threatening disease but, Mr. Fraser probably having written every medical excuse known to man would only say, "Unless it is your Mother, Father or wife, who has been struck-down with leprosy, I'm afraid I cannot grant your request therefore I would appreciate it if you joined "Malnutrition", (or whatever ship he was attempting to staff), in Tilbury on ------" and leave it at that You could virtually guarantee the bloke you would be relieving would be Eric which would make you feel even more hard-done by!!!. I can't recall which ship I went deep-sea on with Eric but everyone commented on the fact that he was actually being prised away from coasting, making comments about his not being able to cope once we had lost sight of land etc. etc. However he turned-out to be just as good fun deep-sea as he was coasting. Salaams

I spent about a year on the coast 64/65 and Eric was on every ship I was on I think along with Alex Pritchard 3rd mate.Eric prided himself on living on his expenses as he went from ship to ship without leave!(I did 5 months myself without any leave).
I coasted the MAHRONDA in 66 when the seamens strike caused us to be relieved at Southend (fully loaded for deep sea)and I'm sure Eric joined then which dumfounded me.
Nice guy though and great fun to have around. Salaams!

Don A.Macleod
26th May 2007, 11:31
I am one of the rarer of the engineering species, Don. I actually sailed deep-sea with Eric!!! Not many people can say THAT! Eric seemed to be on permanent coasting duties and was the envy of quite a number of Engineers who would have appreciated a month, or several, 'going round the land'. I tried it on with 'Mr. Fraser', quoting one of my relatives as having some obscure life-threatening disease but, Mr. Fraser probably having written every medical excuse known to man would only say, "Unless it is your Mother, Father or wife, who has been struck-down with leprosy, I'm afraid I cannot grant your request therefore I would appreciate it if you joined "Malnutrition", (or whatever ship he was attempting to staff), in Tilbury on ------" and leave it at that You could virtually guarantee the bloke you would be relieving would be Eric which would make you feel even more hard-done by!!!. I can't recall which ship I went deep-sea on with Eric but everyone commented on the fact that he was actually being prised away from coasting, making comments about his not being able to cope once we had lost sight of land etc. etc. However he turned-out to be just as good fun deep-sea as he was coasting. Salaams

Now Phil,don't knock "Mr Fraser" he was a very reasonable and sympathetic type who kept asking you for favours! to do a coastal when on leave from MAIHAR or MAHSUD. I was in Antwerp on the MANGLA when Bill Sherrat(Chief)
came and said to me take your pick!You've to go home ,pick up your gear and go to Colombo to MARKHOR and also go to MAIHAR in Seattle the next day.Mr Fraser always had his finger on the button! Happy days,of course we didn't have computers then to really confuse the issue.Don.

Philthechill
27th May 2007, 07:50
Now Phil,don't knock "Mr Fraser" he was a very reasonable and sympathetic type who kept asking you for favours! to do a coastal when on leave from MAIHAR or MAHSUD. I was in Antwerp on the MANGLA when Bill Sherrat(Chief)
came and said to me take your pick!You've to go home ,pick up your gear and go to Colombo to MARKHOR and also go to MAIHAR in Seattle the next day.Mr Fraser always had his finger on the button! Happy days,of course we didn't have computers then to really confuse the issue.Don. I thought I'd managed Christmas AND New Year at home, in 1965, but 'Mr. Fraser' had other ideas and I was asked (ordered?) to join 'Maidan' in Glasgow on New Years Eve. New Years Eve-------in Scotland? Me, as a Sassenach, was in grave danger of being chucked-off the train let alone making it as far as Glasgow---------------or so I thought. What I hadn't reckoned on was the EXTREME hospitality all Scots feel to all fellow human-beings on that most auspicious of Festivals! I got onto a packed, and I mean PACKED, train at York heading first for Edinburgh then crossing that fair city to catch the trian to Glasgow. I had to stand all the way to Edinburgh taking only token sips of the countless bottles of whisky thrust my way! I had been told that the agent, a Mr. Scott (would you believe!) would meet me under the clock near Menzies. What 'Mr. Fraser', nor the agent for that matter, hadn't thought about was that around five million 'Jocks' were all making their way home for Hogmanay and all five million were waiting under the clock 'near Menzies'! By a stroke of good fortune (as you will soon read I don't think it was 'good' fortune at all)) , similar to Man discovering Penicillin, we met each other and 'Mr. Scott' told me that, because the tugs would all be stopping work soon, as it was New Year, 'Maidan' had already sailed! "Whoopee", thinks I, "I'll just hop on a South-bound (probably completely empty) train and be home in time to celebrate New Year in my own boozer!" Ha! Wrong! Mr. Scott said we were going to Greenock, I would leap on the Pilot Boat and then join the ship mid-river (can you imagine the 'elf and safety Gestapo agreeing to THAT these days!?). We caught the train from Glasgow to Greenock, went to the Pilot Station where I boarded the Pilot Boat and went out to join the ship. What I hadn't been told was that 'Maidan' was light-ship having just come out of drydock and then loaded a small amount of cargo at Yorkhills. All I could see above me was a towering wall of steel with a cargo-cluster hung over the rail effectively blinding me. I started climbing the pilot-ladder, after lashing my case to the heaving-line lowered for that purpose. Half-way up, near crapping myself with fright and by this time in an ever-growing rage I heard a voice (the owner of which I couldn't see because I was blinded by the cargo-cluster) shouting for me to "Hurry-up! We've got to get down-river as soon as possible!" "I'm doing my f******g best!" I shouted back and eventually made it to the deck. Stepping out of the glare of the cargo-light I looked-up to see who the idiot was ho'd been shouting at to see the glowering face of Captain Arthur Baron (?) staring back from the bridge-wing! My problems were far from over though as, when I got to my cabin, Johnny Watt was waiting for me, "Get yourself down below as soon as possible! We've a hot bearing on the shaft and I need you down there to keep it cool!" I spent New years Eve and New Years Day morning down the 'shaft-alley' of 'Maidan' nursing a hot shaft-bearing. Happy days (?) M-m-m-m-m-m-m The jury is out on THAT particular memory!!!!!! Hilarious in retrospect really! Salaams

Tony Selman
27th May 2007, 10:43
Great story that Phil. I was coasting Mahseer (I think) in the mid 60's and we were in Tilbury and early morning on 24th December I was just packing my bag to go home for the festivities when I was Shanghaied on to Cunard's Alaunia in Victoria Docks. When I protested as I had never had a Christmas at home I was told the R/O had gone sick and they were waiting to sail and I was the closest man available. Tilbury to Fenchurch Street by train, taxi to the Docks, sign on by ENG2 and we sailed at 13.00. Force 8 in the Channel on Christmas Day - those were the days eh?

Philthechill
27th May 2007, 12:09
Woweee am I on a roll to-day!!! Another posting!!!! We were leaving Jeddah on "Mangla" and, midway between the two reefs that had to be negotiated entering and leaving that God-forsaken place, we 'lost' the duty boiler feed-pump and the stand-by pump failed to cut-in. Because we were in a somewhat precarious navigational place it was deemed wise to "drop the pick", whilst we effected repairs, so Hugh Evans (Mate) duly sent that necessary piece of hardware plummeting to the sea-bed. The problem was found to be that the Weirs feed-pump had sheared the drive-shaft on the independent oil pump which not only fed the bearings it also, crucially, via its oil-pressure, kept the main steam valve open. As soon as the drive-shaft sheared oil-pressure failed and the steam-valve slammed shut, robbing the boilers of feed-water and shutting themselves down. Forward motion ceased, phone-call was made explaining we had no steam available for the mundane task of turning the turbines and, ergo, the propeller! Several "ring-pieces", on the bridge, went into half-crown/sixpence mode very rapidly!!! Whilst we (the "Black Gang") were slaving under extremely hot
(140-150F) conditions "Pem" was maintaining constant vigil in the Bar making sure that the newly introduced draught Tennents was in perfect condition!! Once we'd got the feed-pump squared-away and things back to normal we went out on deck for a bit of a blow. I was stood outside the bar looking hot and pathetic (all carefully stage-managed to gain maximum sympathy of course!) when Pem appeared at one of the bar-windows with a pint of Tennents. He opened the window (a/c was working as we still had electrical power) and thrust it through for me. Stupidly, because of my extreme body-temperature and the coldness (about 33F!) of the Tennents I 'downed it in one'! My stomach instantly rebelled and the Tennents was projected over the foredeck at huge velocity!! Pem didn't even blink, just went back to the bar, got me another, handed it through the window and urged me to "take better care of this one Phil!" Top man!! Salaams.

Don A.Macleod
27th May 2007, 12:54
Those were the days Phil!Spent a Friday getting from Glasgow to Southampton to join a "Port" job.I arrived there in the early evening to be told that I was to go up Middlesbro' and join the MAHOUT.So I spent Saturday getting up there on at least three trains and got there about 8pm sailed shortly afterwards.A long two days.

Allan Holmes
28th May 2007, 19:53
captain pembridge???????????


Very fond memories of Pem. First sailed with him on old Mahout in September 1959 as second R/O with Ted Cookson and his wife. Sailed with him again on my first trip deep sea as Chief R/O on Malakand in July 1962. Couldn't wish for a nicer Captain to sail with. Sorry to hear he has left us.

Allan Holmes

mahseer1
6th June 2007, 00:39
As a personal touch I am attaching Capt Pem's signature. I only coasted with him briefly but have only positive memories.

sparkie2182
6th June 2007, 12:10
nice touch mahseer

sparkie2182