Does anyone remember the "bazaar baht"

Philthechill
20th May 2007, 07:34
Not fully understanding the shipsnostalgia format (slowly, slowly getting to grips with it now) I posted a sort of request in my "profile". However realising, now, that these 'profiles' are probably rarely visited my 'request' may never be answered! So I will repeat it now, as a thread, and hope someone can provide the answer. Does anyone remember the "bazaar baht" version of "The Three Bears"? It starts-------"Ek upon a budgee there was teen bear, Burra Bear, Memsahib Bear and Chota Bear" Beyond that I'm lost. It really is of great importance that I manage to learn it as I want to show-off to my 6 year-old granddaughter!! Burra Salaams.

non descript
20th May 2007, 08:03
Phil,

I have taken the liberty of editing your thread title - that way you may get a quicker result.

Good luck and I hope it works for you.

(Thumb)

treeve
20th May 2007, 10:38
What is "bazaar baht"?
baht is the monetary unit of Thailand, I think, any connection?

K urgess
20th May 2007, 12:33
Treeve

Bazaar baht was the "lingua franca" or pidgin English/Hindi spoken by Indian and Pakistani crews on the likes of Bankboats etc.

Sorry Phil, the only things I can remember are not really fit for young ears.

Kris

treeve
20th May 2007, 13:56
Thanks for that Kris - I try and learn something new every day.

Philthechill
20th May 2007, 14:14
Phil,

I have taken the liberty of editing your thread title - that way you may get a quicker result.

Good luck and I hope it works for you.

(Thumb)
Cheers Tonga! By ommiting the title of my thread off I couldn't have illustrated my "feeling my way round the site" better could I?

non descript
20th May 2007, 19:01
Phil,

We have all done it... no worries and if it brings to thread up to the top again and gives it more air time, that's not bad either. (Jester)

Geoff Garrett
20th May 2007, 20:51
Hello Phillthechill,

Try to get hold of a copy of the "Malim Sahibs Hindustani". Some copies may still be available in any Marine/Seamanship bookshop. Hindustani for ships officers, standard issue on all British vessels with Indian crews. Bazaar Bhat, a trade language meaning literally, market-talk, the lingua franca of coastal India.

Rgds,
Geoff.

12-4
20th May 2007, 22:06
Brown, Son & Ferguson Ltd sell the book

The Malim Sahib's Hindustani

for £3.75
@

http://skipper.co.uk/catge.htm

K urgess
20th May 2007, 22:19
Thanks for that, 12-4.
I'd just ordered it from elsewhere 'cos I need a refresher course.
Managed to cancel it and get it from Brown's.
You just saved me 4 quid.(Thumb)
Cheers
Kris

Geoff Garrett
20th May 2007, 23:57
Hello Kris,
Some years ago, went into an Indian restaurant in Birkenhead (of all places) and ordered my meal in what I thought was pretty good Malim Sahibs Hindustani and the waiter got most upset with me, demanding that he be addressed in English(scouse?) and that he was'nt a dog.

From this, I would assume that the patois I learnt from the "book" would lack some of the delicacy of speech that would be required when dining out in Merseyside, so be careful with your refresher.

Rgds,

Geoff.

K urgess
21st May 2007, 00:44
Geoff,
Most of the Bazaar Baht learnt at the hands of Bankline involved strictly non PC racist remarks that wouldn't be tolerated today. I'm afraid sub-continent crews were not exactly treated as equals either by the officers or the company. Jildy, jildy you b......... b......... being a prime example.

I've already had that treatment from an Indian restaurant in South Shields while I was at Martec for my electronics ticket in '74 when several sheets to the wind and demanding poppadums to go! Ocean Road used to be lined with them.
Kris

Geoff Garrett
21st May 2007, 01:34
Kris, I would suggest that if Bazaar Bhat is not preferred for dining out in Merseyside then also rule it out for Clydeside.

I would have thought that it would have been quite acceptable on Tyneside and as for your Humberside or B.W.Hartlepool I would imagine that Urdhu be not only preferred but demanded?

Philthechill
21st May 2007, 07:14
Hello Phillthechill,

Try to get hold of a copy of the "Malim Sahibs Hindustani". Some copies may still be available in any Marine/Seamanship bookshop. Hindustani for ships officers, standard issue on all British vessels with Indian crews. Bazaar Bhat, a trade language meaning literally, market-talk, the lingua franca of coastal India.

Rgds,
Geoff. Geoff! Shukria for the bit of info re. "Malim Sahibs Hindustani". "12-4" suggested a place to purchase and I've duly fired-off the necessary "pice" to their Cassab to get one sent! Next time you (or any of us who read these hallowed pages!) are in contact with an Indian call-centre wait until you are about to break-off your conversation with them and, after they've asked if there's anything else you want to know, say "No that's fine. Shukria". "Shukria" is, I think, Urdu (possibly Bengali) for "Thankyou". Usually, if it's a girl you're talking to they will be chuffed to bits and ask where you learned to "bolo the bat". Then you can bore them witless about your time as a hairy-a***d old seadog! Salaams, Phil

Tony Selman
21st May 2007, 12:53
This is good news. I have been meaning to buy a copy of this for a while now but have at last done the same as everyone else. A quick purchase of Brown, Son & Ferguson shares might be in order if the orders keep flooding in like this!

David Davies
21st May 2007, 16:34
abi nay, humra malim sahib chitii tut ghia taura peechi pukariga. hum ka bolo

R58484956
21st May 2007, 16:47
Was the ER log book called "burrah kitab" ??

K urgess
22nd May 2007, 11:37
Humara kitab punchner a fudja!(Thumb)
Juldi bi atcha.
Mirbani
Burra Marconi Sarb.

PS It may take some time to reply to Phil's starter question for ten![=P]

David Davies
22nd May 2007, 15:09
Humra kitab kida geer? um nay mulum, ducera admi kapas. sorry my spell check tutgeer

K urgess
22nd May 2007, 16:57
We're going to get told off soon for not responding in English.(EEK)

Sorry David but my copy only has one of those words in it so I didn't get any of that except "mine".

Must admit that I remember Bazaar Baht as being more mixed with a lot of English as well as some Urdu thrown in.
Maybe that was the Bankline version.[=P]

Kris

David Davies
22nd May 2007, 19:26
Ok Cris I'll "chupa row" My BI batt is 50 years old and only phonectic translation "were has my book gone? I don't know.the other man has it. my spell check is broken" chupa row means be quiet

Keith Adams
28th May 2007, 04:15
I always thought that the Bazar Bhat language was used among all India and Pakistan coastal peoples and seafarers as a bastardized single language inorder to communicate ... there being a multitude of languages spoken as a first language in those countries, with Bazaar Bhat secondary, but needful ... English seems to have taken over the secondary language role nowadays. No jokes about Welsh accents as I bet we sound equally funny speaking Hindi ! Snowy

Nick Jones
28th May 2007, 05:34
Ah! the Bombay Welshman.

Cheers.
Nick Jones

Derek Roger
28th May 2007, 22:07
On Maipura in 1965 we had almost all the nursery rhymes translated literally word by word . It of course made no sence to the crew at all . Harry Jefferson and Ray Palfreemen seemed to be the most adept at the recistations .
BaaBaa Cala Mesh ( Ba ba Black sheep etc )

Little Red Riding Hood was quite good ! Chota Lal Jigagig Tope ; and so on .

On that trip the war broke out between Pakistan and India and we went to Rangoon to change crews so we could enter India ( Visak )
Unfortunatley the customs would not open the bond so we ran out of beer etc during a somewhat protracted stay.
The engineers decided to have a "tea party " every afternnon in what became a long " Smoko " during which we all in turn recited that rubbish much to the amusment of all .
The crew really thought we had totaly lost it !!! I suppose we had ! .

An amusing incident occurred during our stay in Visak when one evening all the guns on the hill top opened up ; supposedly at an Pakistani plane which in the end turned out to be a satelitte .

The problem of the bond was solved when Ray Palfreeman found out the bond hinges were on the outside of the door and carefull removal of the pins allowed the door to be opened without breaking the seal .

Derek

David Byrne
29th May 2007, 18:07
I recall that dunnage, or indeed any timber, was 'lakri' when bollowing the baht. Hence, the broad translation of "oh you would, would you?", as "tum lakri, lakri tum?"

'Lakri' Woods would no doubt have approved.

Also, I have found that 'tora chini, tora char, tora dud and bot atcha' will often get you a free beer in a curry house, even in Liverpool, but especially in South Shileds. Or, alternatively, a clout round the ear.

Bot salaams.


David Byrne

rgrenville
29th May 2007, 18:42
That Ray Palfreeman was always a very enterprising chap!

Dick Grenville

David Davies
29th May 2007, 21:03
I sailed with a master Capt Woodcock known as "Lakri Lowra"
Also Toro cheeny tora char, Bombay Bibbi boht atcha,
Sola anna eck Rupee, Pundro anna eck buckshee.
Ah dulali sahib dulali sahib dulali sahib
Bombay boht atcha
The rest is so rude I've forgotten it
Does any one remember the working chant of the Indian kelasi when hauling on a rope? It started with the tindal acting as shanty man calling "he ha burra malem" the kelasis would reply then sodomising the Mate, next 2/0 then 3/0 and so on. The only one s excluded were the Captain and the Serang.
Humra lowra pukeriga, tumra chute merakaga or words to that effect.

joesoap
26th June 2007, 23:21
Not fully understanding the shipsnostalgia format (slowly, slowly getting to grips with it now) I posted a sort of request in my "profile". However realising, now, that these 'profiles' are probably rarely visited my 'request' may never be answered! So I will repeat it now, as a thread, and hope someone can provide the answer. Does anyone remember the "bazaar baht" version of "The Three Bears"? It starts-------"Ek upon a budgee there was teen bear, Burra Bear, Memsahib Bear and Chota Bear" Beyond that I'm lost. It really is of great importance that I manage to learn it as I want to show-off to my 6 year-old granddaughter!! Burra Salaams.

I don't supose a rendering of 'Twas on the goodship Venus 'would be in order Phil would it.

Derek Roger
27th June 2007, 03:01
In a previous thred I posted Burra Billie Lakeri . Nobody was able to translate ?? Seems to simple. Derek

Eric Walter
27th June 2007, 06:49
A couple more that I picked up:

lakri kakri - the sh...y end of the stick

tunda panne purriwallah - Coldstream guardsman

Eric Walter

Philthechill
27th June 2007, 10:25
Joe! Salaams! Provided your rendition of, 'twas on the good ship Venus is in fractured Hindi, Bengali, Urdu or any other of the multitude of languages that come out of India it will, indeed, be most acceptable! "Ag-wallah! Hitherao! Batti-engine tail! Juldi! Batti-engine boat gurrum! Tum bloody cootah! Juldi! Dos-number sahib will have your bloody guts for garters!" See I'm absolutely fluent after all these years!!! Salaams, Burra Teen-number-sahib!!

Geoff Garrett
28th June 2007, 00:27
I should really open up another thread up on Papua New Guinea "Pidgin", (another trade language similar to Bazaar Bhat/Swahili etc)a mixture of Island dialects, English and German and the one word that always amused me, was the word for Piano - "bigblakpellahiteminmowthmaksingsing".

K urgess
28th June 2007, 10:31
Have you heard the recording by the one time police chief at, I think, Kavieng, Geoff.
His descriptions are hilarious, particularly with respect to the arrival of the first piano.
The Pidgin varies a lot from island to island and depends a lot on the nationality of the first missionaries.
This (http://www.june29.com/HLP/lang/pidgin.html) is a dictionary of Pidgin as used in Port Moresby and is quite different from that spoken in the outer islands.
One of my favourites from the Kavieng area is "Bik akus bilong whiteman you pushim ee go you pullim ee come". = Wood saw

Kris