Does anyone remember....

thunderd
1st June 2007, 11:06
In the mid fifties on the ben vrackie I sailed with a pretty well known sparks called John Gilhooley. He was a real character and I wonder if anybody knows what happened to him.

K urgess
1st June 2007, 11:27
Derek
If it's the same one "Gilhooley J." was employed by Marconi through East Ham depot and was on leave in May-June, 1975.
Obviously one of the longer serving "characters" and probably a regular on "Benboats".
Beyond that I can't help

Cheers
Kris

roymuir
1st June 2007, 12:56
I sailed with an older sparks in either Benstac or Bendearg (late '70s) by the name of John Gilhooley. He was a bit of a character and always seemed to be in strife for knocking off the nightwatchmans supper (2 rashers of bacon and two raw eggs). I suppose this is the same bloke.

Regards, Roy.

Moulder
2nd June 2007, 11:42
Has anyone, per chance, ever sailed with an old Benline R/O - George Dickson? He was my boss for my first trip on mv Benhope in July 1971.

I last worked him later in 1972 when he was still on her for the scrapping voyage.

Regards,
Steve.
(Thumb)

K urgess
2nd June 2007, 11:49
Another one from Marconi's East Ham depot, Steve.
Also on leave in May-June, 1975, if it's the same Dickson, G.W.
The only one listed with that initial. The other one has the intials E. H. R.
Cheers
MS

Moulder
2nd June 2007, 21:35
Cheers Kris - seem to recall those were his initials. Would have thought he would have retired when Benhope was scrapped though - he was retiring age when I sailed with him in '71.

Regards,

Steve.
(Thumb)

EBenarty
2nd June 2007, 21:41
I knew John Gillhooly well , I sailed with him on the Bencairn for 3 voyages 1973 -1974. He stayed in Edinburgh area, a fine man but it was always a job to get him to put his hand in his pocket when it came to paying !! His wife did a trip with us, she was a lovely woman and great fun.

thunderd
3rd June 2007, 00:06
I knew John Gillhooly well , I sailed with him on the Bencairn for 3 voyages 1973 -1974. He stayed in Edinburgh area, a fine man but it was always a job to get him to put his hand in his pocket when it came to paying !! His wife did a trip with us, she was a lovely woman and great fun.

Yes I remember that he had very long pockets and short arms.

fitlike
10th June 2007, 02:57
I sailed with him on the Ben Attow 1975 or 1976,
He was allways in the crews bar when we were in Bangkok talking to the ferret
Eric Cardno

binliner
20th June 2007, 17:25
had the good luck to about six voyages on various ships with john- mainly the bencairn--the man could bring a tear to a glass eye with his tales of how hard his life was. Well known for his ' thrift' reputed to have floored the loft of his house with dunnage that he collected during voyages.

Paul Barford
21st June 2007, 13:04
Sailed with John on the 'Attow.
Nice man but as previously said,was well known for his thrift! Outbound just after leaving for the Far East, John appeared down below one afternoon with an old rusted and holed silencer box from his car.He says to me "Paul, I hear you weld, could you fix this up for me." I thought he was joking at the time and threw it in the scrap bin, much to his disgust! He retrieved it and said he would ask someone else!!

On another occasion, he comes to me and says he had noticed I got a lot of mail, a did I collect the stamps? So I gave him all I had but he say's no, they were not the ones he collected! Remember how Ben Line stuck on stamps for "insufficient postage" which were never franked?
These were the ones he was after.
He also went around the changing rooms looking for soap and soap powder he could use, the brass scrap bin also had to be hidden in the engineers workshop as he would be into it!
The story about him using dunnage in his loft I can well believe as he landed dunnage in Grangemouth from that trip!
Happy days!(Thumb)

thunderd
22nd June 2007, 00:45
Incredible stories of an unforgettable but lovable scrooge, I sailed with him as a young cadet on the Ben Vrackie and he was constantly scrounging drinks etc, we used to hate going ashore with him as he never....ever bought a round.

trotterdotpom
22nd June 2007, 12:44
Incredible stories of an unforgettable but lovable scrooge, I sailed with him as a young cadet on the Ben Vrackie and he was constantly scrounging drinks etc, we used to hate going ashore with him as he never....ever bought a round.

Sounds bad, Derek, but on a Ben Line ship he would have been with Marconis and probably only able to draw 12 pounds per month on the ship - not a lot to live on.

I remember being forever in debt and making restitution whenever the ship got to a port where there was a Marconi Depot. We had a pay book which you took in and could get a sub from the Manager. My unreliable memory tells me that on a Ben Line ship you could have been re-imbursed at Penang, Singapore and Hong Kong.

John T.

thunderd
23rd June 2007, 00:53
Thanks John but I'd reckon Mr. G. still had the forst penny he ever earned.

Now in your case, knowing your unflinching and dedicated quest to sample the wares of every pub in the universe, I can well understand your constant state of poverty......just joking John....cheers

trotterdotpom
23rd June 2007, 05:26
Thanks John but I'd reckon Mr. G. still had the forst penny he ever earned.

Now in your case, knowing your unflinching and dedicated quest to sample the wares of every pub in the universe, I can well understand your constant state of poverty......just joking John....cheers

Very true, Derek, they were difficult times! I nearly always went home broke and had to go away again after a couple of weeks. Nop that I was all that worried about it - so many bars, so little time....

Maybe your friend Gilhooley was one of the few that caused everyone over the border to have a reputation for "short arms and deep pockets".

John T.

EBenarty
23rd June 2007, 22:22
John may have had deep pockets, but on one occassion in Bangkok a crowd came on board collecting for Leprosay and he dug into his pocket and gave very penny he had !!
It was probably more than any other individual on board gave !

EBenarty
23rd June 2007, 22:41
Very true, Derek, they were difficult times! I nearly always went home broke and had to go away again after a couple of weeks. Nop that I was all that worried about it - so many bars, so little time....

Maybe your friend Gilhooley was one of the few that caused everyone over the border to have a reputation for "short arms and deep pockets".

John T.

Most Scottish people are very friendly and offer you a dink and join in their company if you are on your own. Wheras across the border you are ignored In the Norh of Scotland we are very generorous
.

trotterdotpom
24th June 2007, 11:13
Most Scottish people are very friendly and offer you a dink and join in their company if you are on your own. Wheras across the border you are ignored In the Norh of Scotland we are very generorous
.

I can't argue with that - I know it from my own experience. What's more, they exported their hospitality to that great Scottish colony, New Zealand.

Your story about Mr Gilhooley illustrates that maybe he was "just marching to the beat of a different drum", let's hope the leprosy collectors were really what they said they were - sorry to inject a cynical note.

John T.

K urgess
24th June 2007, 11:17
In the days of flow charts becoming the vogue for fault finding and such Marconi published one in the Mariner house magazine entitled "How to avoid buying a round in the bar".
So he was probably just following Company Orders.[=P]

I have a copy somewhere. If I ever find it I'll attempt to post it.

mikeg
24th June 2007, 14:12
Anyone in Shell sailed with an R/O John Connelly. He was a direct employed SRO/E like myself. I remember being on a technical course with John and relieved him couple of times on ships. He was quite a character, wrote poetry, certainly enjoyed a drink to two, full of zany fun and an excellent R/O to boot. Tales about John's antics used to circulate the fleet.
Mike

kate2finn
30th January 2009, 00:09
I have enjoyed reading about Jock Gilhooly.My husband sailed with him and always seemed to get on well with him.One time they were on leave John invited us over to his house in Bonnirig.His wife Cathy cooked us a lovely meal and we had a great day with them.They had a beautiful home . The house name was FIDDLERS GREEN. John was one of lifes characters

Gareth Jones
30th January 2009, 00:20
All this talk of Scots meaness reminds me that a Yorkshireman is allegedly a Scotsman who's lost his sense of generosity !

Waighty
1st June 2011, 18:02
All this talk of Scots meaness reminds me that a Yorkshireman is allegedly a Scotsman who's lost his sense of generosity !

I take all this with a pinch of salt. As an Englishman who served his time in Ben Line I experienced no animosity whatsoever. I lived and worked in Dunfermline, Greenock and Edinburgh for close on 17 years when I came ashore and loved every bit of it and the folk I met. If you treat folk right and with respect you'll be treated right in return.