Paint finish

Plumber
2nd June 2007, 18:00
Hello all Modellers,
I am seeking advice on how to achieve a smooth finish to hull and masts.
I am building a plank on frame model of the Rhoda Mary, but unable to rub down and woodstain to a smmoth finish. Should I use Humbrol enamel paints instead..
Your comments very welcome.
Thank you

trawlercook
3rd June 2007, 00:35
hi plumber ive built plenty of models that had a wood finish,i fill all my models with car filler to seal any gaps sand it flush.then when the hull is as smooth as i can get it i use exsternal wood stain with the varnish finish sand that very lightly with the finest emery i can get stain again do the same as many times as you like until you get the finish you want.lightly sand one more time ,then get a spray can of satin varnish spray all over the hull,as it dries you will see a perfect finish that will be water tight.and a satin finish looks better than a gloss or a matt.thats my way and ive sold to collectors and museums all over the world.
hope this helps
colin

benjidog
3rd June 2007, 01:07
hi plumber ive built plenty of models that had a wood finish,i fill all my models with car filler to seal any gaps sand it flush.then when the hull is as smooth as i can get it i use exsternal wood stain with the varnish finish sand that very lightly with the finest emery i can get stain again do the same as many times as you like until you get the finish you want.lightly sand one more time ,then get a spray can of satin varnish spray all over the hull,as it dries you will see a perfect finish that will be water tight.and a satin finish looks better than a gloss or a matt.thats my way and ive sold to collectors and museums all over the world.
hope this helps
colin

Trawlercook,

I admire your workmanship - you must have the patience of a Saint to get your models to a perfect finish.

Power to your elbow!

Regards,

Brian

allan besant
3rd June 2007, 11:28
Hi Plumber,
You dont say why you cannot sand down to a smooth finish. Perhaps one could finish a lot of the spars ect before fitting them in your model. This often works well with what ever finish you choose. Olso the use of a sanding sealer is very useful way to harden and seal your wood prior to sanding ect. As Colin suggests small wooden models don't always look right if they are finished in gloss. As well as using stain I often seal my hull's with sanding sealer and coat with a good undercoat and sand in between coats to get a nice finish but be careful to retain the shape of the planks if need be, then when you are happy, finish with satin or gloss spray or even by brush the result is good. I olso feel that brushes are very important, buy good quality brushes they are not cheap but worth it anything up to £10 each 12mm X 12mm is a handy size. Better to lay on 2 -3 thin coats of paint rather than 1 thick one. If you choose a gloss finish you need your painting room to be at a nice temperture so that you paint flows, if it is to cold the paint will not spread if it is too hot it will dry too quick both ending in disaster and lastl but not least keep brushes very clean and the same with the paint container Good Luck. ----------------Allan

nhp651
4th June 2007, 19:34
Hi, Plumber, As a teacher of woodwork for many years I always followed in the footsteps of a master woodworker and french polisher who taught me all I ever knew about woodwork and finishes.( he should know as he was a builder of Mosquito fighter bombers during ww2 )in the early days before 2 pack paints, acrylics and such modern paints came along, he advised me that to get a good finish on timber was firstly to take your time between coats.2 was to use a cellulose sanding seeler, and wire wool each coat down, ONCE THE COAT HAD COMPLETELY DRIED,BUILDING UP A NICE HARD AND LUSTROUS SHINE. Use 50/50 seeler and thinners ( celulose) and put on with a good camel hair brush.once the final coat has been rubbed down with wire wool use a melted bees wax to finish the woodwork.he told me to use wire wool on unpainted timber, because to use wet and dry, the residue would seep into the open grain and stain it grey. it has never failed me, and always leaves a hull with a lovely satin sheen, and not glossy.hope this has given you a little help.neil

Plumber
4th June 2007, 20:41
I would like to say thank you to all who took the time and trouble to reply to my query about paint finishes o models. There is some very good advice,and I will be taking notice. If I ever reach the end I will try to show the results.
Thanks again.

jimrudnicki
7th January 2008, 01:31
Plumber, Perhaps you can be of assistance. I have an incomplete kit of the Rhoda Mary (I got it from my wife's uncle's estate). I'm missing all the paperwork with the full scale detailed drawings etc.which make it impossible to do anything with the balance of the parts etc.

As far as smoothing out your wood parts prior to staining, I agree with earlier posts to sand with fine paper and fill with sealer. Also, you may consider an alternative to painting which is to finish with a clear but not glossy finish such as Aqua Fabulon in the Satin variety. I've done the whaling ship C.W. Morgan with this and the results are stunning! Aqua Fabulon is a brand name that originally was made by Pirece & Stevens but the brand was acquired by the big paint company Sherwin-Williams. If thats not available where you are look for a waterbased polyurethane or acrylic of the satin (not high gloss) type. if you wish to help me please PM me - Thanks.

(Edited to remove email address as per site policy - MS)

JimC
7th January 2008, 17:04
Hi PLumber!

I was advised by a paint chemist many years ago about how to treat and protect a walnut table top. I took his advice and that was 43 years ago - the table still looks like new. His recipe was start with 10% clear, gloss finish polyurethane to appropriate thinners. and build-up a multi coat system - increasing the proportion of poly -u until 100% then give three more 100%coats to finish. From the start: allow each coat to dry fully and when dry; rub down between each coat with soap, water and very fine wire wool. It takes for ever but the end result is well worth the effort. The fact that you use gloss means that any finish between high gloss and matt can be acheived. Can't tell you how much booze has been spilt on the table as it would brand me a 'plonky' but there is no trace. Mind you - after many years practice; I can retrieve a spilt drink faster than a speeding bullet!

JimC