BP's 1st supership

NORDICA
11th June 2007, 01:44
does anyone have pics and info on th BRITISH ADMIRAL?

James_C
11th June 2007, 01:55
Nordica,
Here's her history and a couple of photos, one of her going down the ways at Barrow, the other at sea. Hope this helps.

S.T. British Admiral
61768 grt, 39858 nrt, 111274 dwt
ON 306310
917'6'' x 128'6'' x 51'8 3/4''
Two steam turbines manufactured by the shipbuilder, double reduction geared to a single shaft. 25000shp
17.03.1965 Launched by Vickers Ltd., Barrow in Furness. YN 1069
04.08.1965 Completed and handed over to the BP Tanker Company Ltd.
15.09.1965 Transferred to the BP Tyne Tanker Company Ltd.
02.07.1976 Sold for demolition.
15.07.1976 Arrived at Kaoshiung for demolition.
30.08.1976 Tung Ho Steel Enterprise Company Ltd., commenced work.

NORDICA
11th June 2007, 02:11
she really was a good looking ship was she not.
such a shame she was broken up far too soon!(Cloud)
what was her port registry?

James_C
11th June 2007, 02:27
She would have been London registered, in common with the rest of the BP fleet.

NORDICA
12th June 2007, 00:15
is the british tamar still in the fleet?
i saw this vessel in 1982 and thought she was a handy looking ship.

James_C
12th June 2007, 00:26
The Tamar finally went to scrap late in 2000, having been with BP all her life. The very last River boat, the British Esk, went very early 2001. It was sad to see them go, good ships.

M.T. British Tamar
15644 grt,9650 nrt, 25094 dwt
562'7''x82'2''x31'6''ft
ON 358940
6-cyl 2SCSA (740x1600mm) B&W 6K74EF type oil engine manufactured by S.A. Cockerill-Ougree-Providence, Seraing. Fitted with bowthruster. 9600bhp.
04.12.1972 Launched by N.V. Boelwerf SA, Tamise/Temse. Yard Number:1469.
11.05.1973 Completed and handed over to the BP Thames Tanker Co Ltd.
1999 Owners restyled as BP Amoco Shipping Ltd.
2000 Sold to Xinhui Ship Breaking Iron & Steel Company, China, for demolition.
02.12.2000 Departed from Singapore en route to breakers yard.
13.12.2000 Handed over to Chinese Shipbreakers at 1100 LT.

sparkie2182
12th June 2007, 00:52
i saw the british admiral launched in barrow..............in 1965......i was 10.
the backwash was such that it caused lots of people to scatter on the opposite shoreline, on walney island.
for all the ships launched here in the past.......there seemed to be real concern that the backwash from this giant could cause unforseen problems, and special police patrols were set up to make sure no one was swept away.....:)
when on the stocks.........she seemed gigantic..........compared to the tenement buildings around the shipyard.
when she was launched.........it seemed as though half of barrow was sliding into walney channel...... and a huge gap appeared in the space she occupied.
because of her size,she was not able to lock through the dock system to she shipyards fitting out facilities,so she was launched in a rather more advanced state than usual,and she was actually fitted out in tidal walney channel, in a special "deep water berth" and fitted out there.( the shipyard had to come to the ship)
this weekend we had a sea festival in this same shipyard, and on the same slipway........there was a funfair..........the slips having long fallen into disuse.
all the cranes have been long since dismantled, the slips lie silent.

regards to all

sparkie2182

fishcake
12th June 2007, 12:36
Liked the colour photo of James C's Tamar. Never sailed on the Tamar or the Esk but sailed on most of the other river class. I really liked these boats apart from the Todd combustion burners. Had some great runs on these boats. One thing I don't like now is the removal of the BP logo from the funnel. I've heard this was to protect the company from any bad publicity if any collision or spillage should occur.

James_C
12th June 2007, 13:19
You're correct in that the reason for removal is to avert any adverse publicity in the immediate aftermath of an accident. Naturally anyone can go on the web and see who owns whose ship, or look at a copy of Lloyds register, but by then the PR/Spin machine of the company involved will have notched into gear ready to deal with the press.
This was as a result of the Exxon Valdez incident. Shell took a lot longer than most to change, they still had 40ft High shells on the sides of the hull until circa 2000. That was of course until the Sydney Olympics where one of their tankers was quite prominent in the Background!
In the early 90s when BP ships still had the logo on the funnel, everytime a ship went to the States a group of 6 painters were taken onboard for the duration. Their only job was to paint out the funnel logo immediately should there be any incident.

NORDICA
12th June 2007, 23:23
its something you see but dont realise its taken place if you get my drift!
i must admit that BP and Shell are the only tanker operatos i take much interest in.
do BP still operate VLCC's or is it now pure handy size vessels?
also the color pic of the Tamar is stunning!

James_C
12th June 2007, 23:27
Still got 4 VLCC's, all built 1999/2000:

British Pioneer
British Progress
British Pride
British Purpose

All 306,000 dwt (or thereabout). Believe they're the largest ships in BP Fleet history. Nice accommodation too.

NORDICA
12th June 2007, 23:32
i think it was the progress i saw at sullom voe last year but was not too sure, it was immaculate! big bugger too!
is that book on BP still in print do you know?

James_C
12th June 2007, 23:42
Depends which one you're on about? If you're after a definitive history of ships I'd recommend "BP Tankers: A Group Fleet History" by Harvey and Solly.
The first print run has ended, and they're currently making corrections for the 2nd Edition.
As for the Progress, she would look good as the the company spent a fortune on her in late 2005. Due to a lack of money she'd fallen behind in the maintenance stakes, and due to knackered machinery and no spares the guys onboard had to resort to desperate measures to get rid of bilge water in the Engine Room, ended up pumping it straight over the wall. So in a bid to make themselves look good, everything that was knackered onboard suddenly got fixed.

NORDICA
12th June 2007, 23:51
maybe it was her then. she stood out lets put it that way!
miss my time over on shetland, used to spend loads of time sitting at the voe tanker watching. have to invest in the book cos my knowledge of BP is a little rusty now and need to update.

HENNEGANOL
13th June 2007, 11:04
[QUOTE=James_C;132736]Depends which one you're on about? If you're after a definitive history of ships I'd recommend "BP Tankers: A Group Fleet History" by Harvey and Solly.

Still available on Amazon, new and used, 23 to 38, I've just obtained a copy for a friend!

Gerry.

NORDICA
14th June 2007, 20:59
just spoken to my mother in law and she reminded me of her late husbands memoirs. in it he talks of the BRITISH TEST, one he delt with at fawley in the late 70's. can anyone help?

James_C
14th June 2007, 22:00
M.T. British Test
ON 358731
15653 grt, 9675 nrt, 25245 dwt
562'6'' x 82'1'' x 31'5''
6-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. (740 x 1600mm) B&W 6K74EF type oil engine manufactured by the shipbuilder. 9000bhp.
15.08.1972 Launched by M/V Eriksbergs Ab (Lindholmen Div), Gothenburg. Yard No: 659
16.01.1973 Completed and handed over to the BP Tanker Company Ltd and time charted to National Iranian Tanker Company.
1976 Irano-British Ship Service Company Ltd., appointed as managers.
1979 Removed from management.
1986 Sold to National Iranian Tanker Company and renamed 'Minab 4'.
16.04.2004 Arrived at Gadani Beach for demolition.

She also served in the Falklands, and was accordingly awarded a South Atlantic Battle Honour, and her crew the South Atlantic Medal.
In Gibraltar when war broke out, she was immediately ordered back to the UK. She was delivered on time charter on passing the Nab Tower on 9th April 1982 and loaded Fuel Oil whilst at Portsmouth. She sailed on the 11th for Lisbon arriving on 14th to load Avcat, and arrived at Gibraltar on 15th to complete loading with dieso. She sailed from there on 18th April and beam refuelled RFAs on the way to the Falklands. On her return voyage she carried 80 survivors of RFA 'Sir Galahad' to Ascension and arrived back at Portsmouth on 4th July and was re-delivered to the Company.

NORDICA
14th June 2007, 22:04
as usual jim your a mine of info, thanks.
she looks very similar to the tamar, are they the same?
beautiful design me thinks.

James_C
14th June 2007, 22:07
They were sisterships, there was a class of 16, all built in various yards, but concentrated on Eriksbergs, Cockerills and Scotts.
Used to be a favourite at 'Pub Quiz' nights aboard ship to try and name all 16.
Just for the record, they were:

British Avon
British Dart
British Esk
British Fal
British Forth
British Humber
British Kennet
British Neath
British Severn
British Spey
British Tamar
British Tay
British Test
British Trent
British Tweed
British Wye

NORDICA
14th June 2007, 22:20
you amaze me jim!
where on earth do you store this stuff?
you are def a man in the know.

fishcake
15th June 2007, 11:25
I seem to remember that two of these river boats were actually "ity" boats. The Humber seems to come to mind. from one of the photos in the gallery it can be seen that the bridge doesn't protrude from the superstructure as does the other River boats.

James_C
15th June 2007, 12:01
fishcake,
It was only the Humber. She was also the only one built in Croatia. For reasons best known to the management at the time she was given a 'River' name, and as such was included with the other 15 'real' river boats on all company Documentation and management etc.

fishcake
15th June 2007, 12:08
Thanks Jim
I've trawled through the photos of the rest trying to see any differances, and got nowhere

NORDICA
16th June 2007, 10:10
IN YOUR OPINION CHAPS what is the best looking and most comfortable ship in the BP fleet past and presant?
i cant comment on the comfort having never been on any but for looks, it has to be either the admiral then thee river class.

John_F
16th June 2007, 18:15
The best lookers were, in my opinion, the Italian 35s. When down to their marks they looked like true greyhounds of the seas, especially with the midships block placed slightly aft of centre. (May be a tad heavy on the hyperbole!). For their time, the accommodation was very light & airy compared with British built of the same era, which tended to use dark woods on bulkheads. They were not comfortable though. Vibration was awful, especially in ballast.
The most comfortable (in my era) I consider to be the 50,000 tonners - the Queen & her ilk.
However, taking everything into consideration - looks, comfort, runs, - how can you beat the Birds?
Have attached photos of Beacon, Queen & Gannet as examples of all 3 classes.
Kind regards,
John F.

twogrumpy
16th June 2007, 20:08
Agree about the accomodation on the 50's, think they were the best cabins I had at sea.
Reckon the all aft Guardsman was better than the midships Hussar, though good sport on the Hussar watching the midships crowd on their way aft for meals in bad weather.
The Eyties may have looked good, and had a good turn of speed when they were actually on the move, but with garbage engineering, steel and electrics they were a pain to live and work on.
twogrumpy

janbonde
16th June 2007, 20:10
With regard to the stack badge,it was introduced into the company about 53/54,if I remember, the first ship I was on which had this badge was the El Morro all the others prior to that had the old BTC stack markings

NORDICA
16th June 2007, 20:45
Good Looking Ships Indeed, The Beacon Is The Best Looker Of The 3

gadgee
16th June 2007, 21:42
Have to agree with John F that the "Light" class had good lines with that rake at the top of the bow, and the placing of the amidships structure. The Italians could always be trusted to design something pleasing to the eye whether it was a ship, automobile or a woman! LOL

NORDICA
16th June 2007, 22:55
am i the only one that likes the all aft look better?

richardc
16th June 2007, 23:59
I must admit I liked the 32's for looks especially with the tall masts. For comfort and runs though I agree with John about the Birds, apart from UK - NW Europe coasting in winter when there was no match for the 16's with their cargo office!!

Richard.

Dave Edge
17th June 2007, 04:51
In addition to Jim's list there were two further River class, the "Kotuku" and "Kuaka", both from Eriksbergs in 1975, built for New Zealand coastal service. As far as I know the "Kotuku" is still trading as "Bora 1".

NORDICA
17th June 2007, 15:07
32's and 16's? you have lost me!

HENNEGANOL
17th June 2007, 17:10
32's and 16's? you have lost me!

If you have never sailed on them, then you haven't lived! They were the mainstay of the fleet when I first went to sea and more important they were ships, teak decks, brass fittings etc. Not the floating boxes which, today, masquerade as ships.

Gerry.

John_F
17th June 2007, 17:38
32's and 16's? you have lost me!
Nordica,
Examples of a 32 & a 16 - great ships!
The Merchant is a 32 & the Chancellor a 16. The 32,000 tonners (dwt) were the crude carriers from the mid 50s onwards & the 16,000 tonners, although some started as crude carriers, gradually became clean oil vessels in most cases. They were classic ships.
Kind regards,
John

NORDICA
17th June 2007, 17:54
oh i see!
so what would the larger ships be called? apart from iron coffins!

HENNEGANOL
17th June 2007, 18:14
oh i see!
so what would the larger ships be called? apart from iron coffins!

Fortunately they are not "Iron Coffins", as far as I'm aware none of them have plummeted to the ocean floor, never to be seen or heard of again. However from a purely aesthetic point of view they cannot compare with the gracefull lines of both tankers and cargo ships of the 50's and 60's.

Beauty is said to be in the eye of the beholder, if you were sailing on a particular ship you didn't worry about its looks! You were more concerned as to whether it was "Sea Kindly", the standard of accomodation and feeding and whether everyone on board got on together. This was particularly true before the advent of regular relieving, when you might be on the same ship, with the same crew, from six to eighteen months.

Gerry.

barnsey
19th June 2007, 10:42
Jim there were 18 in the class !!!! the last two came from Eriksbergs .... and were named .....

Kotuku and Kuaka .... !!! the New Zealand "Birds"

We altered them ... slightly ... we needed the accommodation. We also did without Inert gas.

Barnsey

NORDICA
20th June 2007, 19:35
as an aside, has anyone ever sailed to edinburgh?
ive seen superships from the forth bridge and wondered what was there. does it have a name?

wtaylor
21st June 2007, 09:51
Been to Grangemouth several times if thats close enough
Wilt

Fraserbetts
21st June 2007, 10:46
back to the Admiral
sailed as c/o on her 4/5 2006. Sailing from Skoldvik she parted company with the TA which tried to exit via the e/r room skylight. Spent a short while in Falmouth for repairs alongside before being transferred to the Forties Kiwi. Relieved by George Allan. I believe she then went in to dock for major repairs as the company wanted another cargo out of her before going to scrap. Whilst alongside, the company asked for the bell to be taken off and returned to London to offer to the ships sponsor. Guess what; the original had gone!!

NORDICA
21st June 2007, 20:51
the admiral was indeed a looker.
the place im on about is mid river just before the railway bridge.

John_F
21st June 2007, 22:17
Are you thinking of Leith where Britannia is retired?
By the way, what is the largest size tanker that can get into Grangemouth these days?
Kind regards,
John.

fishcake
21st June 2007, 22:26
The berth you are thinking about is Hound Point. The VLCC's are to big to get further up the river so a pipeline runs from there up to the refinery at Grangemouth.

NORDICA
21st June 2007, 22:44
ah i see. your a star fishcake.
the max dimensions for grangemouth are 183M LOA, 26.2M beam and 11m draft, john f hope this answers ya question. hound point you say?

trevflstn
22nd June 2007, 22:11
as an aside, has anyone ever sailed to edinburgh?
ive seen superships from the forth bridge and wondered what was there. does it have a name?

In Autumn 1977 we sailed into Leith on the British Esk (25000 dwt) and I believe we were the biggest ship (tanker?) ever in the port. We had the local TV cameras there as we entered.

NORDICA
25th June 2007, 10:41
do you have any footage from that day at all?
what was she like so sail on?

trevflstn
25th June 2007, 10:46
Don't think I have any pictures but if I do I will post them. The Esk was quite a good ship, almost permanent NE Europe coasting. The Master, Capt Cliffe (known as Jasper by nearly all who sailed with him) was a bit of a TV addict and was not amused when we got orders for Ceuta, Nouhadibou and Dakar as it would take us out of range of UK TV.

rushie
25th June 2007, 17:08
Done Grangemouth, to visit my old man who was Master on the Loyalty.

The "Border" ships that supply the Scots ports..e.g.Inverness still sail from there regularly.

One of my dad's best friends (ex BP) was Alan Rouse - who was in charge of the berth at Hound Point. Anyone remember him.?

See separate thread I posted a few months back (news and views section) about ship to ship transfers in the Firth of Forth. They're trying to get bigger tankers in there, but can't dock them.!

Cheers,

Rushie.

NORDICA
25th June 2007, 17:13
cant get em in there?
how big do they want them! i have been told that vessels up to 400,000tons can load there, so either there is some mega monsters on the way or my info is wrong!

aspinani
16th July 2007, 21:55
went to hound point on the British Resolution many times and also with the British Commerce, been into Grangemouth on the British Hawthorn

NORDICA
16th July 2007, 23:07
is hound point still used?
what are the bigger vessels like to work on?
is the work harder cos of the size of the thing!

Graham Wallace
27th July 2007, 20:49
John Sutton was Commodore C/E on Admiral from construction (in Nagasaki)thru launching and sailed July 1965 until October 1969 (ouch!! , 31/2 years in total!). I think his son David (on SN) has some personal photographs of that.
John Parry (ex 1959 BP Egineering Apprentice) was with him at times on her 4/E to 2/E. I think John is still helping BP on new construction in Korea.

Graham Wallace

andysk
30th July 2007, 11:29
........ Tamar finally went to scrap late in 2000, having been with BP all her life. The very last River boat, the British Esk, went very early 2001 .......

That really does make me feel old !

I was working for IMRC at the time they were being built, we provided the comms kit, complete with new VHF (STR65) and telex.

Cheers

Andy

oilybob
10th August 2007, 01:26
Hi there I am a bit new to this site, still sailing with bp at the moment. Sailed on the british tamer twice, both as cadet and junior engineer, she was still going strong when i was on her only 4 years before she was finaly retired.
For at least the last 6 years of her life she spent all the time in north west europe/uk trade I remember going to swansea, grangemouth, coryton, amsterdam, hamburg and a few other places the furthest being a vast long voyage down to the corsica in the medi. The only reason for such a long trip was to give time for a full tankclean to allow for a full inspection to work out the requirements for her last drydocking.
Although she was equiped for UMS operations we only ever tried that once at anchor and it lasted all of 2 hours, she was run as a traditional watchkeeping ship as she was run very much as a semi-automatic vessel, i.e a fair amount of the 'automation' did not exactly work as designed.
In her later years she was backfitted with a full load containerised caterpiller generator tucked up on the stbd side behind the bridge, this became a godsend due to the rather tempermental paxman diesel.
To who it was who mentioned the todd combustion system on the boiler well that had long gone as had another later one, the one fitted at the time was reasonable but there where so many water level alarms and trips with it being a duel pressure boiler it was not exactly uncommon to have high, high-high and low -low alarms up at the same time in rough weather, you certainly learned how to hot foot it up to the drums with magnet in hand to reset the magnetic switches, after having first started one of the diesels and with steam pressure dropping off............

To answer someone elses question Hound point in the firth of forth is actualy a loading terminal for north sea oil, piped in down from cruden bay area in aberdeen, I believe grangemouth refinery is also supplied from the same line, it was origionally supplied with crude from a jetty on the west coast, still occasionaly used I believe.

oily bob 2nd engineer

Naviguesser
10th August 2007, 02:11
Still got 4 VLCC's, all built 1999/2000:

British Pioneer
British Progress
British Pride
British Purpose

All 306,000 dwt (or thereabout). Believe they're the largest ships in BP Fleet history. Nice accommodation too.

I really like that class of ship!

NORDICA
12th August 2007, 03:08
would love to work for BP on the ships but alas im too old now

NORDICA
11th September 2007, 15:00
do bp do visits for those interested in ships?

beverlonian
12th September 2007, 15:25
fishcake,
It was only the Humber. She was also the only one built in Croatia. For reasons best known to the management at the time she was given a 'River' name, and as such was included with the other 15 'real' river boats on all company Documentation and management etc.

My recollections at the time were that the yard in Split (I think) were contracted to buld 3 vessels. Two were the Unity and Fidelity. For whatever reason the last vessel was delayed until the River class was built. Rumour at the time was that the yard did not have the technical ability to build a River class vessel, so BP settled for a third -ity boat but gave it a River class name (Humber) as it was being delivered at the same time as these.
I sailed on the Dart and Kennet, both good vessels with the exception of the boiler automation which was a nightmare.

Vital Sparks
19th September 2007, 18:19
Yup, the Humber was sometimes known as the Humber-ity and was indeed an "Ity" boat. Slightly lower tonnage than the river class and no inert gas plant as I remember.

albert.s.i
5th October 2007, 10:52
hi lads, i feel a right novice after looking at the threads of bp tankers my first was the british drummer i dont know what class she was only small compered to the discustion her sister was the bugler then in 1953 on contract joined the bulldog 28 thousand ton which were big at the time, did 8 trips from isle of grain to mina al amadi, then joined the soldier 32.000 ton and i was under the impression she was the biggist of the fleet at the time the first one to put the BP logo on the funnel they even put flood lights port and starboard to show it up at night i was pumpman and maiden voyage was from john browns shipyard glasgow to mina al amadi isle of grain, there i feel better now bon voyage albert s i

zealandic
5th October 2007, 11:16
nice piccy of the gannet i had 5 months as deck boy on her...opened my eyes forever that trip...

James_C
5th October 2007, 13:27
Oilybob,
Are you still with BP? I packed it in last year having had enough. Take it you've gone to the dark side of the force (aka LNG)?
LOL

P Cunniff
9th October 2007, 18:05
does anyone have pics and info on th BRITISH ADMIRAL?

I have pictures of the British Admiral when she was in Cape Town dry dock and i was serving on her at the time

NORDICA
21st December 2007, 21:32
are you gonna post them or are we to wonder what you have pic wise?

llewy
21st December 2007, 23:52
My uncle Peter Harrison was a C/O for BP. Anyone know what ships he was on?

derekhore
6th January 2008, 09:29
I had my 21st birthday on the Admiral, September 73......and also spent the Christmas on her off Cape Town.
We were on the reduced speed for bunker conservation run!!

Capt was Bob 'coco' Rowntree, C/O was Bob Hammond, 2/O was John Hayes from Brixham and 3/0 was Bill Pogson.
R/O was Geoffrey Hammond, plus his wife Noelene!
Only engineers I can remember were the electrician called Elvyn Wilkes from Falmouth and the 4/E Dave Eyres and wife Ann.

I think the CPO was a George Cowie, and we had 2 GP's aboard who were brothers...the Killips!

Have a few pics of her in Verolmes dry-dock, Rotterdam, taken in November 72 ... some are already on SN.

ernhelenbarrett
6th January 2008, 11:33
Nice to read about all those BP Supertankers. I had just finished a 12 Month
stint on British Gratitude/MAGQ (Complete with SPARK Transmitter!!!) and Marconi (as usual in 1954) could not give me leave, due to Sparks shortage)
offered me a SUPERTANKER so BIG they were giving me a junior R/O... It was
Shells "Velutina" and she was all of 28000 tons... a Giant!! I refused.. and ended up 5 years on the Indian Coast with BI !!!. Boy , was I young and innocent in those days!! ...Ern Barrett

derekhore
6th January 2008, 11:44
Hi there I am a bit new to this site, still sailing with bp at the moment. Sailed on the british tamer twice, both as cadet and junior engineer, she was still going strong when i was on her only 4 years before she was finaly retired.

Although she was equiped for UMS operations we only ever tried that once at anchor and it lasted all of 2 hours, she was run as a traditional watchkeeping ship as she was run very much as a semi-automatic vessel, i.e a fair amount of the 'automation' did not exactly work as designed.

oily bob 2nd engineer

Brings back a memory of the Br Trent .... she used to go UMS every day at 1700, through till 0700 next day. The 2nd mate at the time, who will remain nameless, used to hate this and totally despise the engineering dept for being able to sit in the bar all eve.....so he worked out that by switching the funnel floodlights on and off briefly would give rise to an earth fault on the baord....sounding the duty engineers alarm and getting an engineer down below.
He managed to do this for several weeks in the Medi before people put 2 & 2 together and worked out these alarms only ever sounded on the 12-4, never on my 8-12....they eventually traced the fault and the cause....and the reason why it was happening!

Needless to say the 2/O was not a popular figure after that!!

wedgewood
30th January 2008, 20:53
My recollections at the time were that the yard in Split (I think) were contracted to buld 3 vessels. Two were the Unity and Fidelity. For whatever reason the last vessel was delayed until the River class was built. Rumour at the time was that the yard did not have the technical ability to build a River class vessel, so BP settled for a third -ity boat but gave it a River class name (Humber) as it was being delivered at the same time as these.
I sailed on the Dart and Kennet, both good vessels with the exception of the boiler automation which was a nightmare.
I was was working in Britannic House during the period when the Unity was in the final stages of construction and went to Yugoslavia several times. Was on board during trials off Split. The second vessel was the Fidelity and I believe the third was to be the Tenacity but cannot be 100% on that as I left BP before she entered service

RBH
30th January 2008, 21:21
To get back to BRITISH ADMIRAL, I also watched her being launched. She was fitted out in Walney Channel, being too large to go inside the docks (she followed METHANE PIONEER on the Walney Channel fitting-out berth). I had occasion during her fitting out to go on board her deck and down (and back up) a very long Jacob's ladder on her starboard side to a small visiting Norwegian tanker berthed there and delivering bunker fuel. Despite being in Barrow for 16 months she was the only ship launched there during that time.

Rodger Haworth (RBH)

mofnotmuff
1st February 2008, 21:39
I served on Dart Forth Esk Spey and Tay whilst with BP - I also served on shoush (ex british surveyor)during "the" gulf war when Mokran Minab and Marun used to come alongside to tranship kero up to war zone - I was under the impression that these 3 ships were river class BP ships but changed name when sold to Iranians- anyone know which was which

As a footnote my best trips with BP were on the River boats with some class runs ashore, singapore curacao fiji and new zealand ports to name but a few

alastairjs
2nd February 2008, 13:36
mofnotmuff,
Mokran ex British Neath, Minab ex British Fal, Marun ex British Severn. Minab and Mokran ended up as one ship named Mokran. Both the original vessels were badly damaged during the war and in 1987 the afterpart of Mokran was joined to the forepart of Minab by Jurong Shipyards, Singapore. Britsh Dart was purchased by the National Iranian Tanker Company in 1986 and became Minab (2). The composite Mokran didn't have the best of luck as she was hit by an Iraqi Exocet missile 3.2.1988 while on passage to Kharg Island and sustained fire damage aft. She was towed back to Singapore and repaired again and continued trading until 6.4.2004 when she was beached at Chittagong for demolition.
Regards,
Alastair

junkcatcher
14th February 2008, 16:26
The Avon & Kennet had Scott Sulzers rather than B & W not sure about the other two that were built the same yard --- the B & W was much superior.
Avon suffered "T2 style" major structural failure crossing the North Sea the winter of 1977 but got to port ans was welded back together.

The bow thruster wasn't fitted to most of the "River Boats" it was on the Tamar (and istr the Tay ????) to demostrate the cost/benefit ratio to the accountants.

junkcatcher
14th February 2008, 16:33
mofnotmuff,
Mokran ex British Neath, Minab ex British Fal, Marun ex British Severn. Minab and Mokran ended up as one ship named Mokran. Both the original vessels were badly damaged during the war and in 1987 the afterpart of Mokran was joined to the forepart of Minab by Jurong Shipyards, Singapore. Britsh Dart was purchased by the National Iranian Tanker Company in 1986 and became Minab (2). The composite Mokran didn't have the best of luck as she was hit by an Iraqi Exocet missile 3.2.1988 while on passage to Kharg Island and sustained fire damage aft. She was towed back to Singapore and repaired again and continued trading until 6.4.2004 when she was beached at Chittagong for demolition.
Regards,
Alastair


Interesting the Dart had a colision not long after she was built and was repaired by having the bows built for another unfinished river boat grafted on. So the Mokran became a "bitsa" three river boats.

Wasn't the Dart the first river class.

Ferrous Phil
19th February 2008, 14:39
The Avon & Kennet had Scott Sulzers rather than B & W not sure about the other two that were built the same yard --- the B & W was much superior.
Avon suffered "T2 style" major structural failure crossing the North Sea the winter of 1977 but got to port ans was welded back together.

The bow thruster wasn't fitted to most of the "River Boats" it was on the Tamar (and istr the Tay ????) to demostrate the cost/benefit ratio to the accountants.

It was just the Tamar and Esk fitted with a bow thruster.
Br Forth, also Scotts built, also suffered structural cracking problems. During a storm in South China Sea around 1977 I recall accompanying the CE and going for'd and using an air drill to try and stop the cracks extending around bows and chain locker area. We ended up diverting to Hong Kong for repairs which as I recall took some considerable time.

NORDICA
29th February 2008, 00:19
greetings. just been given a copy of the company book, BP TANKERS. impressive i have to say. out of all the vessels in it the "RIVER" class are in my eyes the best looking of the all aft designs. what were they like to sail on? of the bridge amidships types the the BRITISH FULMAR is a real looker indeed. are any of the amid type still about?

MichaelGeorgiou
19th March 2008, 10:28
Depends which one you're on about? If you're after a definitive history of ships I'd recommend "BP Tankers: A Group Fleet History" by Harvey and Solly.
The first print run has ended, and they're currently making corrections for the 2nd Edition.
As for the Progress, she would look good as the the company spent a fortune on her in late 2005. Due to a lack of money she'd fallen behind in the maintenance stakes, and due to knackered machinery and no spares the guys onboard had to resort to desperate measures to get rid of bilge water in the Engine Room, ended up pumping it straight over the wall. So in a bid to make themselves look good, everything that was knackered onboard suddenly got fixed.


Not quite true about taking depserate measures. People were sacked over that incident and I was one of the people who joined the ship just after that in Long Beach to help bring it up to scratch and then dry dock her in Singapore. Ship was in a very poor condition down below and even basic housekeeping had been overlooked.

peterjholcroft
19th March 2008, 15:22
Interesting the Dart had a colision not long after she was built and was repaired by having the bows built for another unfinished river boat grafted on. So the Mokran became a "bitsa" three river boats.

Wasn't the Dart the first river class.

Yes the Dart was the first (from Eriksbergs). It was hit by a vessel called the Dagestan (Stricks) whilst at anchor in the Bristol Channel. The bulbous bow was badly damaged so the bulbous bow off one of the vessels being built in Belgium was shipped round to Swansea and welded on.

Long gone
27th February 2012, 21:17
The Avon & Kennet had Scott Sulzers rather than B & W not sure about the other two that were built the same yard --- the B & W was much superior.
Avon suffered "T2 style" major structural failure crossing the North Sea the winter of 1977 but got to port ans was welded back together.

The bow thruster wasn't fitted to most of the "River Boats" it was on the Tamar (and istr the Tay ????) to demostrate the cost/benefit ratio to the accountants.

I thought all the Scotts-built ships had Sulzers except the Spey, which had a B&W K-EF

DAVELECKIE
28th February 2012, 18:18
The Avon & Kennet had Scott Sulzers rather than B & W not sure about the other two that were built the same yard --- the B & W was much superior.
Avon suffered "T2 style" major structural failure crossing the North Sea the winter of 1977 but got to port ans was welded back together.

The bow thruster wasn't fitted to most of the "River Boats" it was on the Tamar (and istr the Tay ????) to demostrate the cost/benefit ratio to the accountants.

The Esk and the Tamar were the Rivers fitted with Bow thrusters.
A 3.3kv motor powered by its' own dedicated 3.3kv diesel powered alternator.

Dave

DaveM399
29th February 2012, 10:15
The Esk and the Tamar were the Rivers fitted with Bow thrusters.
A 3.3kv motor powered by its' own dedicated 3.3kv diesel powered alternator.

Dave

I sailed on the Esk back in '79 and remember the bowthruster. However, my memory is a bit shaky, but I thought it had a dedicated turbo-alternator, not a diesel one.(?HUH)

Dave

ChrisGLCole
29th February 2012, 12:02
Attached is a phote of the Tamar, complete with bump on the nose, possibly from getting too close to a Russian freighter. I believe the "tree" boat the Tenacitree also did this in Nouadibou?

DAVELECKIE
29th February 2012, 19:26
I sailed on the Esk back in '79 and remember the bowthruster. However, my memory is a bit shaky, but I thought it had a dedicated turbo-alternator, not a diesel one.(?HUH)

Dave

You may well be correct. I sailed on the Esk in approx 1975 and the old memory bank may well be failing me!

Dave