S.S. City Of Lyons

grampsyman
15th June 2007, 20:18
Did my first two trips on the old girl, up the Gulf in 57 and 58, and coasted on her before her last voyage. She was built in Wallsend in 26 and was broken up in Bo'ness in Dec 62, Ellermans certainly got their monies worth out of her. I've often wondered if her old chief engineer, "Frier" Tuck took her to the breakers, but I dont suppose anyone would remember that now. The trips up the gulf for months at a time, were certainly not for the fainthearted, I dont suppose there will be too many going for a run ashore in the likes of Basra nowadays Alan

leggoaft
21st June 2007, 11:39
Did my first two trips on the old girl, up the Gulf in 57 and 58, and coasted on her before her last voyage. She was built in Wallsend in 26 and was broken up in Bo'ness in Dec 62, Ellermans certainly got their monies worth out of her. I've often wondered if her old chief engineer, "Frier" Tuck took her to the breakers, but I dont suppose anyone would remember that now. The trips up the gulf for months at a time, were certainly not for the fainthearted, I dont suppose there will be too many going for a run ashore in the likes of Basra nowadays Alan

Have sent you an e mail regarding Ellermans

Will

leggoaft
21st June 2007, 16:06
Did you receive my message

Will

grampsyman
23rd June 2007, 10:15
At present in Minorca with limited email facilities Will contact you on return Kind Regards Alan

mahseer1
23rd June 2007, 12:49
Just happened to catch the name 'City of Lyons' and it brought back memories of the summer of '51. As 12-year-old and holidaying near Abersoch, North Wales, I was beach-combing a bay called 'Hell's Mouth' and came across a cork lifebuoy from that ship. It was an exciting find for a lad who was already writing to shipping companies in search of a future berth as deck apprentice! It seemed to be intact and I wonder how it got loose. Unfortunately I had no way of salvaging what would now ge a great trophy.

Kind regards
Peter B

R58484956
23rd June 2007, 15:58
SS City Of Lyons,. 7063 tons Built 1926 by Swan, Hunter & Wigan Richardson. Wallsend. 455.5 x 58.1 x 31.8. 3 Steam turbines SR geared to one screw shaft. Turbines built by Wallsend Slipway Co; Newcastle. DF,ESD, Code flags GMCN. Registered Liverpool. British flag. 2 decks. Cruiser stern.Owned By Ellerman Lines (Hall line, Managers)

Oddjob5
25th January 2013, 17:02
Did my first two trips on the old girl, up the Gulf in 57 and 58, and coasted on her before her last voyage. She was built in Wallsend in 26 and was broken up in Bo'ness in Dec 62, Ellermans certainly got their monies worth out of her. I've often wondered if her old chief engineer, "Frier" Tuck took her to the breakers, but I dont suppose anyone would remember that now. The trips up the gulf for months at a time, were certainly not for the fainthearted, I dont suppose there will be too many going for a run ashore in the likes of Basra nowadays Alan


Alan.
Although your post is rather old by now you may be interested in the following.
I remember the "Lyons" well serving in her on my first voyage as a cadet from November 1957 until March/April 1958. Joining her in Bracklebank graving dock Liverpool before proceeding to Manchester with all the fun of funnel top and topmast removals for the MSC was rather exciting for a lad of 16 especially one of those rare breed without any pre-sea school training. From Manchester we coasted around to London en route passing either the Pamir or Passat in full sail with following wind bowling down the channel just a couple of miles away...looking back a truly memorable spectacle The C/O Barcelona sailed from Milwall in the early hours of the New Year I remember to much jeering ! The voyage out to the Gulf and thence home in ballast to Falmouth was rather memorable for two things.
(1). After just having loaded over 120 tons of TNT just above Thameshaven outbound we were struck by Canbera Star coming upriver rounding the bend on the wrong side of the river. This case was used in several publications subsequently to illuustrate the rule of the road in enclosed waters. As a first tripper looking out of the cabin porthole after having been awakened by the bangs, crashes and snapping of stays overhead it was rather alarming to see the bow of C.Star almost in my face with her name in rather large letters running to both left and right ! We had to return to the buoy, dischage the TNT and put back to Tilbury for a week's repairs. (2). The old man getting rather annoyed and sending a cable back home somewhere from the Gulf following the BBC news announcement that a British cargo ship (no name intially given) today blew up in the Persian Gulf ! It was the 'Seistan' some will remember, a few days ahead of us which blew up (toe-puff) with unfortunate loss of life.
The Lyons carried two cadets in a cabin on the stab'd side of the engineers accom. I seem to remember the 2nd but not the C/E although the name 'Tuck' does ring a bell. For all her age the Lyons was a happy ship and was, if memory serves, at the time the only air conditioned ship in the company. A large capacity cargo carier it was said that she was only scrapped because one of her boilers failed survey !