Maiden Voyage - Stena Traveller

Hawkeye
20th June 2007, 14:12
Hi
The Stena Traveller will be making her maiden voyage leaving the Hook today (20th). SHe has been in Holland for the last few days, preparing for service.

Regards
Karl

kasco
16th December 2011, 14:48
Hi
The Stena Traveller will be making her maiden voyage leaving the Hook today (20th). SHe has been in Holland for the last few days, preparing for service.

Regards
Karl
I see she has her upper deck mostly closed in as opposed to the former Stena Traveller. Would this be because the large open deck on the former Stena Traveller was not practical in winter?

Kasco

Hawkeye
16th December 2011, 21:38
I don't see why that would be a problem. Both the Trader & Traveller sailed with all decks full in any season.

kasco
17th December 2011, 12:07
I don't see why that would be a problem. Both the Trader & Traveller sailed with all decks full in any season.
It is possible that the winter conditions here are different than what the Blue Puttees sailed in before, snow and ice. The first winter storm we received 40cm of snow. It was impossible to maneuver vehicles on the deck. As we get into the winter months, snow and ice on the decks will become a problem. While the Puttees was in service with Stena what procedures were in place to accept cargo in snow and ice conditions? Could there be a solution to this problem that we are not aware of? Any suggestions would be of a great help.
Thanks
Kasco

BillH
17th December 2011, 14:52
I see she has her upper deck mostly closed in as opposed to the former Stena Traveller. Would this be because the large open deck on the former Stena Traveller was not practical in winter?

Kasco

Gents,

Can you clarify if you are actually discussing the same vessel?

Does not look like it.

The initiating post was dated 2007, so I presume that was referring to the STENA TRAVELLER entering service then, but which is now renamed in Canada.

Kasco appears to be discussing the new 2011 built STENA TRANSPORTER which has an enclosed after deck as does her sister STENA TRANSIT.

Just my observation.

kasco
17th December 2011, 15:27
Gents,

Can you clarify if you are actually discussing the same vessel?

Does not look like it.

The initiating post was dated 2007, so I presume that was referring to the vessel entering service then, but which is now renamed in Canada.

Kasco appears to be discussing the new 2011 built STENA TRAVELLER which has an enclosed after deck as does her sister STENA TRANSIT.

Just my observation.
You are correct. The vessels that I am referring to are the Blue Puttees/Stena Trader and her sister ship Highlanders/Stena Traveller and comparing them to the new builds Stena Traveller and Stena Transit. Sorry for not making my original query more to the point.
LARGE OPEN DECK= What procedures are in place to keep deck clear of ice and snow so that cargo units can be stowed in a safe manner?

Kasco

BillH
17th December 2011, 17:00
I have seen an aerial photo of one of the new pair and they still have a large open deck and actually appear longer vessels so potentially greater square metrage.

That being the case they would have a greater problem.

However, that said, perhaps the owners, when in design, saw them primarily for a route on which snow was not seen as an issue.

Hawkeye
18th December 2011, 02:15
That also got me puzzled regarding 'enclosed deck'. The Trader & Traveller didn't have them, but the Transporter & Transit do. They still have an open deck, which is higher. As for snow, it isn't as much a problem here then in Canada. The open decks are loaded in all weathers, but they have all day to unload & reload.
Perhaps this is the reason for not using the open decks on the Blue Putties & Highlander due to the time it takes to turn the ships round. What are their sailing schedules like?

Hawkeye
18th December 2011, 02:21
I have seen an aerial photo of one of the new pair and they still have a large open deck and actually appear longer vessels so potentially greater square metrage.

That being the case they would have a greater problem.

However, that said, perhaps the owners, when in design, saw them primarily for a route on which snow was not seen as an issue.

All four ships 'as built' were the same length - 212 m. The later ships appear longer because they are longer. The first two were shortened by about 12 m when they converted for service in Canada.

kasco
18th December 2011, 03:08
That also got me puzzled regarding 'enclosed deck'. The Trader & Traveller didn't have them, but the Transporter & Transit do. They still have an open deck, which is higher. As for snow, it isn't as much a problem here then in Canada. The open decks are loaded in all weathers, but they have all day to unload & reload.
Perhaps this is the reason for not using the open decks on the Blue Putties & Highlander due to the time it takes to turn the ships round. What are their sailing schedules like?
Port times are 4.5hrs daytime and 5.5hrs night time. Difference in port times reflect the different mix of traffic to be loaded day as opposed to night. Both port times will allow 1hr to prepare the open deck for safe stowage of cargo if need be. Therein lies the problem. What is the most efficient way of removing snow and ice from the open deck in this one hour time frame and still maintain the schedule?
Not loading all decks is not a option.
Kasco

BillH
18th December 2011, 11:56
All four ships 'as built' were the same length - 212 m. The later ships appear longer because they are longer. The first two were shortened by about 12 m when they converted for service in Canada.

Hawkeye,

I am aware that the first pair were shortened by Lloydwerft.

You appear to have erroneously assumed that I was comparing the converted pair with the latest pair, whereas the comparison I actually made was of two images, one from each pair "as built". Both images taken in the same location, view and angle.

I believe the reconfiguration of superstructure, the extra decks and shorter funnel on the later pair make them more box like aft and as such give the appearance of being longer, to me at least.

BillH

Hawkeye
21st December 2011, 02:20
Hawkeye,

I am aware that the first pair were shortened by Lloydwerft.

You appear to have erroneously assumed that I was comparing the converted pair with the latest pair, whereas the comparison I actually made was of two images, one from each pair "as built". Both images taken in the same location, view and angle.

I believe the reconfiguration of superstructure, the extra decks and shorter funnel on the later pair make them more box like aft and as such give the appearance of being longer, to me at least.

BillH

Hi Bill

You are correct in your thinking. I was thinking you were comparing the two after the first two were shortened.

Karl

Hawkeye
21st December 2011, 02:31
Port times are 4.5hrs daytime and 5.5hrs night time. Difference in port times reflect the different mix of traffic to be loaded day as opposed to night. Both port times will allow 1hr to prepare the open deck for safe stowage of cargo if need be. Therein lies the problem. What is the most efficient way of removing snow and ice from the open deck in this one hour time frame and still maintain the schedule?
Not loading all decks is not a option.
Kasco

Nice little problem. Didn't the company not think of this when they got the ships? Even with a gang of crew using shovals, as soon as its gone, it refreezes. The only one I can think of is heated decks. Similar to the way the romans used to heat the villas in days long gone.
Do they have similar problems with the Leif Ericson & the Superfast ship, both of whom have open decks, though not as big?
Hawkeye

kasco
24th December 2011, 14:41
Nice little problem. Didn't the company not think of this when they got the ships? Even with a gang of crew using shovals, as soon as its gone, it refreezes. The only one I can think of is heated decks. Similar to the way the romans used to heat the villas in days long gone.
Do they have similar problems with the Leif Ericson & the Superfast ship, both of whom have open decks, though not as big?
Hawkeye
Smaller open decks, smaller problem. Heated decks one solution but how effective with the turnaround times? A liquid that could be applied to the decks, that would melt the ice before loading, would be the ideal solution. One that is not sodium chloride based. Is there such a product on the market? The vessels that ply the Baltic and Irish Seas must have a similar problem. Snowblowers will remove the snow, prevention of refreezing is the aim. Road salt is the least desirable application.