James Dredging Company.

OceansAway
21st June 2007, 01:33
Hi all. Has anyone heard of a past company owned by Robert Ernest Victor James of Southampton, England? The company name may have been "James Dredging, Haulage and Transport Company Limited". It would have existed in the 1930's or there abouts. Many thanks.

billyboy
21st June 2007, 01:57
there are some members on site who actualy worked with "James dredging"
We had two of there dredgers at newhaven for many years. the "Formost prince and the Test side"

gdynia
21st June 2007, 05:26
If you put the following in a Google search alot of pages come up

James Dredging Towage and Transport

R58484956
21st June 2007, 09:48
I worked for James Dredging for a short time in the 50,s, we had dutch masters and English slaves, a time I would rather forget.

OceansAway
21st June 2007, 11:57
Sorry to hear you had this experience. I've heard negative feedback about this family/company also.

JohnMac068
21st June 2007, 17:45
I was on the "James No.95" during the summer of 1967, she was a hopper barge which had been converted to a gravel finding vessel, we pottered along the South Coast taking gravel samples from the seabed and below the seabed using a large fancy air lift type gizmo (the name of which will come back to me, in the middle of the night !) It consisted of sections of approx 24" pipe, with inner pipes through which high pressure water and compressed air were pumped, in the centre was a discharge pipe, the theory was that the air/HP water mix altered the density of the product at the bottom if the pipe, and up through the centre came a steady flow of whatever material was on the bottom. It worked very well, we took samples, and bagged them every few feet of penetration, when the hold was getting a bit full, the wedges were knocked out, the bottom opened, and we started again. We also went up to the Mersey and did a lot of testing in the entrance channel, there it was a lot hairier, we had to moor fore and aft, using wires down aft, with tug assistance, quite exciting in the strong tidal currents up there. We also went to Denmark, sourcing good load bearing sand for Copenhagen Airport. I was also on the "Rockstone" for a while. James Dredging at that time, was part of Westminster Dredging, which in turn was part of the Bos & Kalis Group, hence the Dutchmen mentioned earlier. It was certainly an eye opener for me on the 95, we all, including the Master, lived in the forecastle. If you wanted the engine to go astern, you had to give plenty of notice, something like one to two minutes, this made the trip through the Kiel Canal doubly interesting, we managed not to hit anything, but, on occasions it was a close run thing. Also had to pay for your grub in those days, something like 30/- each man to the cook, if he could'nt manage on that, the skipper would sack him. Happy Days !!!

OceansAway
21st June 2007, 18:27
Wow! Wouldn't get away with that these days. What doesn't kill you makes you stronger...so they say.

JohnMac068
22nd June 2007, 17:47
Sure enough, in the middle of the night, the name came back, it was called a HYDROJET, believe it was invented in Middle Europe somewhere.

nobby s
25th July 2007, 16:56
Hi, OceansAway, yes knew this company very well. My younger brother worked for them after leaving deep sea. James dredging was a well known employer in Southampton. As john mac 068 says they were taken over by Westminster Dredging Co. ( I believe in the '60s ). I know my brother made a lot of friends while with them. 'Fraid he's no longer with us now, gone to the upper ocean (last year).

B.T.Cove
21st May 2010, 21:28
Me, my dad, and his father all worked at james's shipyard me for a short while just before the yard closed as a marine fitter. my dad worked their all his working life as a skipper, right up to about 2004 and his father too. either for james shipping or westminster dredging (Bos Kalis)

archway
15th August 2010, 21:26
The James 46 or 47 was conerted by Westminster Dredging Co to a Trailer Dredger and was the first trailer Dredger in Europe and we were given a book,produced by the American Corp of Engineers who had a number of trailers, to help us breaking this new ground, things have gone a long way since those days. Archway.

KEITH SEVILLE
16th August 2010, 08:32
Archway

I remember the James No.47 working on the Mersey during the sixties as a hopper barge assisting the Bucket Dredger Europa.
In those days a great deal of dredging was performed at Eastham and Bromborough.

Regards
Keith

granty
16th August 2010, 09:59
good day
I joined the Rockstone in Shoreham 1968 Master B Tanner 2nd Mate D Cook
i was in her for a few weeks reliveing the spent a few weeks in the Seastone
Master H Force i think the i got sent the James 95 i joined in Le Havre and
took sample of the coasts of france .Belgium.the arround Harwich Harbour then round to Dublin also to take samples of the bottom for dredging
then left what a wonderfull vessel as said before accomadation fwrd 1 tiolet aft flush with a bucket
before joining James`s i was a boatman at shore and new alot of the men in them F James B Tanner H Force Knocker White D Cook there was a mate in the Whightstone who came from the Syechelles another mate who was an American another who hab been 2nd mate in the Crystal Jewel which was in a collosion of Beach Head With A Tanker British Aviator i think
a lot of memorys for me in this thread
regards
Granty

archway
16th August 2010, 21:59
Hi Granty, B Tanner (or H tanner to give his correct initial ) was master of the Deepstone and D. Cook was master of the Marinestone in the 1970s when I was Marine Supt. for Westminster Gravels. I had heard that Doug Cook had been a cook at one time, he was a very good Master and both he and Bob Tanner became good friends of mine. Archway.

awateah2
16th August 2010, 22:38
Sailed in the 'Bankstone' as 2nd Mate 1968, Master Robert McCartney Kane.Later sailed as Mate in the 'Deepstone' with Bob Tanner and also as Mate / Relief Master in the 'Wightstone' with Frank James. I found them to be a very good company to work for. I also spent time in Gothenburg in the 'Foremost 102'. Happy Days !!!!!
Granty, the Mate on the 'Wightstone ' from the Seychelles was Jimmy Ferrari. I believe he returned there to take up a Harbour Masters position.. Regards

granty
17th August 2010, 10:26
HI AWATEAH2
thanks for reminding me of him in the 6os when he was mate of the whightstone and relieving mr white he came into shoreham 1 morning and went
ashore alondside the training wall opposite the middle pier and stayed there over the low water i had jack uppertons motor boat and attendended all day took out the superintendent was his name rakstrow or something like that
cheers
granty

awateah2
17th August 2010, 11:24
If I remember correctly it was 'Roedskjar' Danish by origin I believe. Jack Upperton is certainly a name from the past along with Riley, Toby, Enner, Boxer and Teddy all gone by now I suppose !!! Regards

granty
17th August 2010, 11:55
hi
the last one was teddy about 2 years ago he got sore on his face did nothing about it and it was cancer ben johnson still going but has breathing problems
its getting to the stage now that at 65 next feb im now 1 of the old so and so`s
cheers
granty

awateah2
17th August 2010, 12:11
Know the feeling Roger !!!! I will send you a PM later today Regards

RayJordandpo
17th August 2010, 14:07
I did a couple of trips as mate on the 'Bankstone' The skipper was a little Welsh chap called "Firey John" I think his surname was Francis but I couldn't be sure, he had a bit of a reputation as being a hard taskmaster but I got on with him fine. I remember him suffering really bad with sciatica and being carried ashore at Zeebruge in absolute agony. Story has it that his relief was skipper of a coaster that got raided by the IRA whilst in Belfast. It may have been a Metcalf vessel.
I also did a couple of trips on the 'Sand Weaver' the old man on her was called Reg and could speak very good Dutch having sailed in the Dutch MN for a number of years.
Does anyone remember an old shipmate of mine called Brian Chapman? He was engineer with United Towing but left to go on the dredgers, I believe he was C/E on the 'Deepstone' then ended up in the office in Southampton.

archway
17th August 2010, 20:58
I remember Brian Chapman he certainly was C/E on the Deepstone but was never in Westminster Gravels office.Wether he came ashore to another office I don't know. I left W.G.Gravels when ARC took them over in 1982, as far as I canremember Brian was still in the Deepstone so may have gone ashore with ARC. Archawy

stoneleigh
17th August 2010, 21:20
I remember Brian Chapman he certainly was C/E on the Deepstone but was never in Westminster Gravels office.Wether he came ashore to another office I don't know. I left W.G.Gravels when ARC took them over in 1982, as far as I canremember Brian was still in the Deepstone so may have gone ashore with ARC. Archawy

Westminster Gravels were taken over by ARC Marine, & Brian Chapman moved in due course into the office of ARC Marine, (later Hanson Aggregates) in Southampton as an Engineering Manager. Subsequently Hansons were in turn taken over by Heidleberg, which made a change because Hansons at one time took over everyone else! Their vessels still retained their former ARCO names however.

stoneleigh
17th August 2010, 21:50
Westminster Gravels were taken over by ARC Marine, & Brian Chapman moved in due course into the office of ARC Marine, (later Hanson Aggregates) in Southampton as an Engineering Manager. Subsequently Hansons were in turn taken over by Heidleberg, which made a change because Hansons at one time took over everyone else! Their vessels still retained their former ARCO names however.
Following earlier points mentioned, I should have stated that the 'Deepstone' was renamed the 'ARCO HUMBER' in during its ARC ownership. It is still operational, and you can frequently track its movements on the internet with AIS. Also the 'Bankstone' had a bad fire aboard, which I believe started in one of its cabins, and it was later sold for scrap. The 'Marinestone' (later Arco Tees), if I remember correctly, was badly damaged after an explosion by underwater ordanance which incurred whilst it dredged somewhere off Lowestoft. I believe it was later towed for scrap to Belgium

commando
23rd August 2010, 16:45
Hi all. Has anyone heard of a past company owned by Robert Ernest Victor James of Southampton, England? The company name may have been "James Dredging, Haulage and Transport Company Limited". It would have existed in the 1930's or there abouts. Many thanks.

Yes they were based in northam southampton,taken over by westminster dredging the yard and drydock are still their i worked for them.

Glyn Howell
3rd January 2011, 11:31
Very interesting reading about Westminster Dredging and the various characters within, but nobody mentioned the Norestone, which, I believe, eventually went out to Pakistan. We ran for a long time into Dunkirk and then into the new docks they were building at the opposite end. Dick Phillips was second mate then.

Glyn Howell

stoneleigh
5th January 2011, 00:49
The berth at Dunkirk the Norstone ran into for a while, was at Gravelines, although it frequently ran into Emile Naves berth nearer the town centre on its regular trips.
I seem to remember Brian Chapman was the Chief Engineer on her around that time, & Bob Tanner was Master.

Glyn Howell
5th January 2011, 16:04
Hi Stoneleigh,
I do not think that Bob Tanner was ever on the Norestone, except perhaps for a short relief. B.Couch, myself, Dick Phillips and maybe the second mate who used to be with Frank James on the Wighstone, though I am very hazy about him, we were attending the transformation from a German Cargo ship to dredger, almost from the beginning at Birkenhead.

We dredged at the Norfolk Bank and then a bank somewhere between the Tongue and North Goodwin Lighvessel. Brian Couch and myself where fortnight about, but I always had Dick Phillips with me. We also had a Radio Officer, who I am certain was one of the Danish Superintendents son's, the other was an actor who appeared in Black Beauty on the TV. When we started on the latter bank, the aforementioned Superintendent sent (ordered) me down whilst he took over the dredging, why I did not put my foot down I don't know, 'cause he lost the Californian Draghead, what a fuss there was about that. I think, repeat think, that Capt Francis also relieved on the Norestone.

I spent a lot of time on the Rockstone at the Isle of Grain, when they were building the power station chimney.

I left Westminster's in 75, and went to James Fishers of Barrow, and messed about with Nuclear Waste, quite a difference.

Glyn

stoneleigh
5th January 2011, 21:58
Hi Glyn, You may be correct, but I distinctly remember the two gentlemen I mentioned being aboard, just before the vessel was sold. I believe Charlie White, & possibly Ken Lymn (Engineer) were also there, & an AB I believe named Wilson? He came from Southampton, as did Charlie. However as you say, they may only have been aboard for a short while before it was sold. I could mention several other facts, but they are irrelevant now, & time can dim the memory.

Glyn Howell
6th January 2011, 17:55
Stoneleigh

You are right, as having read up my records I find I left the Norestone January 1974, then three months on the Bankstone and Wightstone, and then a most arduous 6 months on the Rockstone running up and down from the Shipwash to Rotherhythe, it was most likely that that finished me in dredging. Do you remember S.M.Geddes and a skipper from Eire who went back to Wexford or Waterford, perhaps to be Harbour Master? He might have moved over from James. I met John Francis again when doing a summer stint on Red Funnel Ferries.

Glyn

stoneleigh
7th January 2011, 01:06
Yes, as you say Mr Geddes was'nt that long with them. About that period Peter Butcher was Marine Supt,. & Engineer. Supt. Mike Shane. Both now deceased relatively early in life, the former had returned to South Coast for a more senior position, however the latters death occurred in most unfortunate circumstances
He left Westminster Gravels, to work for a Shiprepair Co. in Hong Kong. However a year or two later, on Christmas Eve, the BBC 9.0 o'clock News Reader stated that a British Engineer had been killed in an air crash in China, whereupon they showed Mike Shanes picture on the screen. Quite a surprise to anyone who had known him, especially at Christmas! Sadly he left a wife, and quite a young family.
It was thinking of the Norstone, which made me remember the above, because Peter Butcher spent time there for the Gravelines contract. In more recent times, a dredger of the same name worked around the Solent area, & I only saw it once, (from a distance), but I think it unlikely to have been the same vessel. Regards, Stoneleigh

Rai
7th January 2011, 17:24
I also worked for Jame's did alot of the work on forementioned pipe. That was 65
when I came ashore for awhile. The yard was run by the boilermaker foreman
called Joe Lyon,his two son worked there as well. Didn't enjoy my time there,
moved over to Husbands shipyard. Now that was a job.
Rai

Glyn Howell
7th January 2011, 17:58
A very good memory Stoneleigh, it brings many things back. Another test, can you remember the MD P.H.Short and Director D.S.Bason?
And on the Bankstone was Dennis White and second mate Malcome Shakesby.

Perhaps those who worked for James Contracting and Shipping remember the crane driver at the wharf, Bob Cater, and Allan C Langham, who was the Buyer?

stoneleigh
8th January 2011, 01:04
I know of the two Directors, I believe one died, & the other moved elsewhere from W.G., & subsequently new Senior Management came in. Also Alan Langham could be described as a W.D. Institution these days, his knowledge at W.D. apparently was without equal.

Glyn Howell
10th January 2011, 16:46
Stoneleigh, hello again.

You mentioned that time dims the memory. Your placement of personnel made me realise that I was hopelessly out time wise. I thought that I had joined W.Gravels in 1971. I was on the Rockstone with (now I remember Richard) Couch and we ran to a basin reached by passing through the locks at Zeebrugge into the Brugge Canal, and then turning hard to Starboard. It was an awkward berth as the Rockstone was a left handed screw. We ran there for some time, but then we were transferred to Bromborough to attend the completion of the alteration of the "Konsul Retzlaff" into the Norstone. The Southampton men used to run up in a hire car and the relieved crew used it to go home.
It had ghastly blisters put on each side to improve stability and four grading boxes down each side of the hold. However, various pointers make me believe the Norstone left Bromborough about August or Septmber 1971.
My lost time was caused by someone stealing my Discharge Book from my cabin on the Rockstone. Can you remember if Peter Butcher came across from being Captain of the Sand Weaver?

stoneleigh
11th January 2011, 02:25
Hello, I think P.B. was Sand Wader, & I'm not certain about any service on the Sand Weaver. I also know the Rockstone at one time had D.Cook as Master for a while, around that period. Later possibly two, (but certainly one), of their vessels went for scrapping on the Thames at Thos. Ward, Grays. I think that might have been the Rockstone, which also had, (I never saw it, so can't confirm), what was thought to be a sister, the Seastone. I believe that one spent most of its existence in Eire, on charter, & finished its days there.
I attempted to find out about it, but found very little of interest. The Norstone was well know for its bilge keels, I had a feeling it was Spanish built, & thought your German reference earlier, was to its previous owners.

commando
17th January 2011, 16:21
Me, my dad, and his father all worked at james's shipyard me for a short while just before the yard closed as a marine fitter. my dad worked their all his working life as a skipper, right up to about 2004 and his father too. either for james shipping or westminster dredging (Bos Kalis)

Hi their,was your dad Ray cove a tug master,if so i worked for a short time with him on the tug jumsey doing the western docks
and also a job at the timber yard at woolston.
Dave.

commando
17th January 2011, 16:26
I know of the two Directors, I believe one died, & the other moved elsewhere from W.G., & subsequently new Senior Management came in. Also Alan Langham could be described as a W.D. Institution these days, his knowledge at W.D. apparently was without equal.

Hi Their,Alan Langham was the senior buyer at james yard at Northam,very clever man,ex fairy swordfish pilot,don,t know if he is still about also the yard manager was Albert Schuring a very well known man for chasing the workers up and keeping them on their
toes.
Dave.

R58484956
17th January 2011, 17:20
Albert Schering an absolute slave driver, he passed away 2/3 years ago.
Sailing down the Solent with him one night on the "Sounder" told him that one of our barges was dead ahead ( you could not tell Albert anything, he knew it all) he said I cannot see it so it is not there. We found it OK, big crash, we kept afloat. The only time he called me by my name and he was human for about 5 minutes. Told me to keep my mouth shut and tell no one.

commando
18th January 2011, 09:04
Albert Schering an absolute slave driver, he passed away 2/3 years ago.
Sailing down the Solent with him one night on the "Sounder" told him that one of our barges was dead ahead ( you could not tell Albert anything, he knew it all) he said I cannot see it so it is not there. We found it OK, big crash, we kept afloat. The only time he called me by my name and he was human for about 5 minutes. Told me to keep my mouth shut and tell no one.

Yeah,used to call him twinkle toes cause he would suddenley creep up upon you in the workshops,i was their from 1973 thro to 1983
worked in the workshops and a short spell as a motorman on the Jumsey,europe bucket dredger and pullwell.
Dave.

roboted
18th January 2011, 09:36
WD......Anyone remember these names from Bromborough,Gravesend,Soton.....
Bill Robinson
Wout Den Dikken
Arthur Cooper
Danny Daniels......????
Sixties to Eighties..

commando
18th January 2011, 10:47
Yes,knew Wout den dikken well,he took over as site director at wd northam southampton,don,t know what he is up to these days ,do you,the yard at northam closed some 20 years ago,i believe the repair then returned to Bromborough,funny thing thou,the drydock we had at northam is still in use
it is now called ocean quay,earn,t some good money their when it was WD,
doing the western docks,with the Africa,Asia,Port Sunlight, and Dibden bay
Dave.

roboted
18th January 2011, 19:35
Yes,knew Wout den dikken well,he took over as site director at wd northam southampton,don,t know what he is up to these days ,do you,the yard at northam closed some 20 years ago,i believe the repair then returned to Bromborough,funny thing thou,the drydock we had at northam is still in use
it is now called ocean quay,earn,t some good money their when it was WD,
doing the western docks,with the Africa,Asia,Port Sunlight, and Dibden bay
Dave.

Wout D.D would be in his eighties now and hopefully is still with us.I last saw him at Northam in about 88/89..A really lovely man.
My old fella,Bill Robinson was senior Super at Bromborough until about 65,when the family moved south,for the Gravesend operation to be set up/expanded ?....Wout came down a few years later and lived in the next village to us....
Was the Port Sunlight a fairly newbuild in 63 with Mirrlees K's,if so the first engine I went into the crankpit ,aged 8/9 !!
This lot brings some memories flooding back I can tell you....
The old fella transgressed the then "Dutch family values" in about 76
I didn't see him for years,until 1982(?),In Hassi R'Mel Algeria !!!! where I took a position as plant fitter,through an agency.
A real WTF !!! moment I can tell you....

Degzie
18th January 2011, 21:13
Wout den dikken is still alive and living in Southport saw him late last year at the funeral of Joe Slagbooms wife. Bas vanden Bos was also there. As were a number of ex Wd employees
Degzie

roboted
19th January 2011, 19:42
Wout den dikken is still alive and living in Southport saw him late last year at the funeral of Joe Slagbooms wife. Bas vanden Bos was also there. As were a number of ex Wd employees
Degzie

Many thanks for that Degzie,appreciated.....I shall have to dig through late Mum's address books and see if I can find a number.

sandman
23rd March 2011, 21:52
Met up with Frank James this morning in Morrisons in Bideford, Frank has told me he now has prostate cancer, but he his still, as chirpy as ever.

Glyn Howell
24th March 2011, 11:05
Morning Sandman,

Tell me, is this the same Frank James that was skipper of the Wightstone or have I dropped in on a thread about someone else?

Glyn

sandman
24th March 2011, 23:40
Morning Sandman,

Tell me, is this the same Frank James that was skipper of the Wightstone or have I dropped in on a thread about someone else?

Glyn

Its the same Frank James Glyn.

Glyn Howell
25th March 2011, 17:39
G'day Sandman,

What a great bit of news that he is still alive. I have a photograph of him looking into the radar on the Rockstone. I was in charge at the time and Dick Philips, the second/ Relief Mate had gone sick and he was rushed out to take his place for a couple of days. If you see him again offer my best wishes to him.

Richard Couch lived out that way, have you ever had any news about him?

I am really chuffed about that news, for although I live around Southampton still, I have never heard or seen any one from "the old days".

Besy wishes Glyn.

sandman
27th March 2011, 16:02
I will do Glyn the next time I see frank, as for richard I have never heard of him sorry. Did you ever come across my Uncle Ian Cox, he sailed in the Wightstone and I believe the Bankstone. I also worked alongside some of the other names mention, Bob Tanner, Doug Cook, Brian chapman, Ken Lymn.

Glyn Howell
27th March 2011, 17:40
Sandman,

My memory of the brief time 1972 to 1975 is, sadly, fading quickly, I remember Bob Tanner very well, as when I first joined Westminster's from South Coast Sand and Ballast I spent some time on the Bankstone with him learning the banks, and so in all probability I met him. Regretfully, names are my nemesis which is most embarrassing when I meet someone after four or five years, I have to use the phrase "Nice to see you again mate!"

Anyway, best wishes, Glyn.

Glyn Howell
30th March 2011, 17:31
I will do Glyn the next time I see frank, as for richard I have never heard of him sorry. Did you ever come across my Uncle Ian Cox, he sailed in the Wightstone and I believe the Bankstone. I also worked alongside some of the other names mention, Bob Tanner, Doug Cook, Brian chapman, Ken Lymn.

G'Day Sandman,

Strange, after being absent from this thread for some time, several names crop up . I was watching "Doctors"...I know, I know..but it is raining and it is cold and I am 77...but one of the actors was a certain Christian Rodska, years ago he changed the spelling from the original Danish for the ease of the English nation, but it brought back, again memories of his Superintendent father. Did you ever meet his father?

Glyn

R58484956
31st March 2011, 18:42
Couple of other names from JD at Northam, Jack Delaney, Bernard,father & son and George a more civilised Dutchman in the engineers office. Alf in the stores.

Ericof_t110
3rd November 2011, 16:05
anyone recall "carnroe","grabwell","48",the Floods,Ken Smith,Bill Coward,the Parkers?All James men I believe.We used to change shifts at 50 berth Southampton.

William Peters
18th November 2011, 06:38
I toiled on the Foremost Southampton in Boke Guinea ‘West Africa’
Bill Cunningham Superintendent, Ken Smith Master, George Hughes Mate.

Since then I have managed to work in the other Guinea’s, Equatorial and at the present moment I’m working in Papua New Guinea.

I learnt a lot from Ken and other masters from WD. There were some bad eggs, but I will hold back on that as time heals ‘honest!’

Bill Peters ex Amerika, Arpley, Southampton, Beaver Chief etc. etc.

Ericof_t110
22nd November 2011, 09:16
Hi Bill,I worked with all 3 of those good men.Ken Smith and George
Hughes in France,and also in several locations in UK. Bill was Agent
in Felixstow on one job.Thanks for that,wonder where they are now?
Eric B.

Ericof_t110
25th November 2011, 12:33
re Ken Smith and George Hughes I think the agent on that job in france was a
Dutchman of many languages called Max Remains?I also worked on F.Southampton in Gibraltar.
Eric

yobsub
14th February 2012, 15:46
hi been reading this thread,was wondering if anyone remembered ted whitfield,who worked for james and westminister dredging ,he lived in southampton being bought up in northam. whitfields all went to sea my dad granddad and great granddad all being sailors.

R58484956
14th February 2012, 18:35
GreetingsB] yobsub [/B]and welcome to SN. Bon voyage.

Ericof_t110
14th February 2012, 23:30
hi been reading this thread,was wondering if anyone remembered ted whitfield,who worked for james and westminister dredging ,he lived in southampton being bought up in northam. whitfields all went to sea my dad granddad and great granddad all being sailors.

hi yobsub,bumpt into Ted in sainsburys,bitterne southampton about 2
years ago.He looked fit and healthy for his age-70ish,said he was doing a" bit of part time "work in a boatyard at northam bridge.
eric b.

yobsub
15th February 2012, 16:25
hi,yea hes still walking about everywhere,got his own little cabin cruiser in bitterne manor.celebrating his 80th in april,would be good to invite some of his old freinds.

terryk
1st June 2012, 17:59
Hi,
My grandfather was a Captain working for James in Southampton from 1915 to 1926, Does anyone have any records or photographs for this period. In 1914 he was Captian of the dredger Catalan working near the Forth Bridge, not sure if the dredger was ownewd by James.

Ericof_t110
1st June 2012, 20:35
Hi Terryk,I worked for James Dredging from early 60's so wouldn't know of the
Catalan.Still nice to get some more interest in the old dredging days,good luck,Eric.

Ray the lecky
2nd January 2013, 19:08
I was an Apprentice Electrician in James Yard where my father sailed out of as Master. He was on the 95, 101, 46,47 all the tugs at some point then Itchen, Test, Hilbre ect. He is here in Canada having just had his 95th birthday.
We replaced the switchboards on the Sandstone, and Rockstone (after her E/R fire), made in the little shop on Bellvidere Road.
Dad's name is Sam Jupe.
I know that this is an old thread but hopefully someone will see it and remember.
Ray

Ericof_t110
3rd January 2013, 08:51
I was an Apprentice Electrician in James Yard where my father sailed out of as Master. He was on the 95, 101, 46,47 all the tugs at some point then Itchen, Test, Hilbre ect. He is here in Canada having just had his 95th birthday.
We replaced the switchboards on the Sandstone, and Rockstone (after her E/R fire), made in the little shop on Bellvidere Road.
Dad's name is Sam Jupe.
I know that this is an old thread but hopefully someone will see it and remember.
Ray
Hi Ray,I remember you from my times on most of the bucket dredgers
and pumps in southampton where I was on deck as gopher, mate and skipper.I also worked with Sam occasionally on F101 at Portsmouth harbour,where ,if I remember right,you put some site lights up for us at Browndown,Stokes Bay.Good to hear from you
regards to Sam,marvelous age,hope you are all well,Eric Buck of Foremost Southampton,and other craft.

Ray the lecky
3rd January 2013, 17:44
Thank you for the reply Eric. I did work at Browndown and Dad was on the Portsmouth Harbour job (Flathouse).
I will go and see him and tell him about this site. He will be really pleased.
A previous post asked about "Ted Whitfield". I wonder if they meant Teddy Whitlock. He had a brother,Len, and their stepfather Charlie Miller, was the labourer/ temporary light man in our shop.
Re your post 3rd Nov 2011.:
The Carnroe was the steam pumper barge that did a lot of the reclamation work with the Dibden Bay. The 48 was the old steam
bucket dredger that worked Southampton waters before the Foremost Southampton came along. I remember the Grabwell doing the test cofferdam for the new container berth at 110 dock way out at the end.They had driven pilings to form a square which was pumped out and Grabwell clam shelled the bottom. She couldn't reach as deep as they wanted to go so 4 Irish labourers were sent down to dig it by hand so Grabwell could haul it up in a bucket. I think they lived in the hold on her!!!
The office keeper at 50 berth was Mr Flood. His son George was often mate with dad and they maintained a friendship until George passed away.
He and his wife came to holiday with mum and dad and had some good times. George was a good guy.
Ken Smith and Bill Coward are names that I remember that dad talks fondly about when we chat.
The Parkers: They were all short guys except for the one who was a floatplant boilermaker. He was big. One of the older ones was a superintendent with the Land and Marine out of the yard. His brother (I think) was deaf and was known as "Deafy Parker". Dave Parker served his apprenticeship in the electrical shop and was senior there. I think that he worked on the QE2 on her first run across the Atlantic. I met him again doing work for us when I was on the Cableship Mercury in Southampton.
Best regards.
Ray

Ericof_t110
3rd January 2013, 21:54
Well Ray,you've brought back some good memories for me there.Ted Whitfield worked on Foremost Southampton with me and Ken Smith in Gibraltar 30 odd years ago,someone dropped a shackle on his head,so after that he was called "shackle head",he was a good hand,must be 80 odd now,last saw him in Bitterne afew years ago.Ted Whitlock past away early last year.Ken Whitlock gets around Shirley,he's 80,don't know where Len is.I did a "run job" from Cork with George Flood a few years ago on F102 I think it was,anyway Sam led the way in heavy weather on F101,I worked the dredgers "Asia"and "Afrika"on that job.
Bill Coward was a nice man,and I recall working with Dick Parker with the survey boat on I.O.W. at some stage.Good old days.
Thanks Ray,best wishes for 2013,regards to Sam,don't expect he remembers me.
Eric .

Ray the lecky
20th January 2013, 00:39
Hi Eric.
Had another chat with my father about this thread and I will now submit the following.

1. George Flood's father and uncle were checkers employed by the Southern Railway. They would check the loads and type of spoil of each hopper before it went to the dump when work was being carried out by James Dredging for The Southern railway. George's dad was later employed as "the man in 50 Berth". Ernie James bought him a new bike when they took him on. Dad recalls that at one time there seemed to be nothing but Floods on the job.

2. He thinks that The Foremost Dredging Company was originally set up to build dredgers in Northern England to sell to South Africa. Ted Flood had the task of preparing the new builds and putting them through their trials. He also had 2 sons on the float plant.

3. When the Carnroe was scrapped, the engineer on the Foremost 102 had the triple expansion engine taken to the Southampton Nautical College and reconstructed it for teaching purposes.

Keep in mind that he is 95 now and can't remember as well as he used to. Maybe there are other members who can confirm some of these statements.
Regards.
Ray.

R58484956
20th January 2013, 12:00
At one time Rhys Bernard was in the electric shop with a Polish supervisor who I think was called Jan.

Ericof_t110
20th January 2013, 13:32
Hi Eric.
Had another chat with my father about this thread and I will now submit the following.

1. George Flood's father and uncle were checkers employed by the Southern Railway. They would check the loads and type of spoil of each hopper before it went to the dump when work was being carried out by James Dredging for The Southern railway. George's dad was later employed as "the man in 50 Berth". Ernie James bought him a new bike when they took him on. Dad recalls that at one time there seemed to be nothing but Floods on the job.

2. He thinks that The Foremost Dredging Company was originally set up to build dredgers in Northern England to sell to South Africa. Ted Flood had the task of preparing the new builds and putting them through their trials. He also had 2 sons on the float plant.

3. When the Carnroe was scrapped, the engineer on the Foremost 102 had the triple expansion engine taken to the Southampton Nautical College and reconstructed it for teaching purposes.

Keep in mind that he is 95 now and can't remember as well as he used to. Maybe there are other members who can confirm some of these statements.
Regards.
Ray.
Hi Ray,I remember some of the Floods.Old Tom Flood was "the man in 50 berth"who rode a push bike,Young Tom a checker for Docks board.Ted Flood I worked with on "F48"at Southend at one time,Harold Kearslake was engineer.Ted's son Jack went to Australia with "Foremost Prince".Ted's Brother Bill was a barge hand at the time.Frankie Parr was Skipper of "Carnroe" for years.James's was "Flooded out",as it were,also a few Parkers.Thanks for the memories Ray,regards,
Eric.

Ray the lecky
20th January 2013, 23:54
Rhys Bernard finished his apprenticeship before me. My foreman was Roy Faithful.
Some other names that come to mind, Dennis Cooper, Shipwright foreman, Alan Anderson, Machine shop foreman, Alf Marlow, Storekeeper, Burt the van driver.
Reg Halford Crane driver's mate.
Barry Langford was a fitter apprentice. His father was a Chief Engineer with dad in the middle east.

Ericof_t110
21st January 2013, 09:21
Barry's dad Jack Langford worked with us on "Afrika"in Cobh,and"Carnroe"and various other jobs in UK.Dennis Brown was with the civil engineering side,Pontoons etc in Southampton.I do recall those other names in the yard,also another driver called George Maunders.

R58484956
21st January 2013, 16:11
R Faithful had his wife working in the office
Danny in the stores, Harry on the gate, Dennis and Ray in fitting shop with that B****** Albert. Ron & John Hampton Old Harry up in the top office.
Some could before your time.

Ericof_t110
21st January 2013, 17:38
Harry Longman,the man on the gate,sent me to 50 berth to see a Dutchman named Adrian 'Harry' Kop who put me on a barge and thus started my journey with 'James dredging co'in the early 60's.
Eric B

Ray the lecky
21st January 2013, 17:50
I don't think that Faithful's wife worked in the office but Leo Crummy worked in the yard and his wife Lydia was in the office on the switchboard.
How about Drake's gang of rough painters and labourers. Now there was a bunch of characters.
Ray

Ericof_t110
22nd January 2013, 09:04
You've got a good memory Ray,how could I forget Drakes gang?Whenever we were layed up in the yard,Albert would conscript all the crew into his gang.
Eric

Ray the lecky
23rd January 2013, 06:26
Had a good chuckle with your last post. Here is today's stroll down memory lane. Do you recall Fred Ward on the Widgeon or Pintail?
Frank Judd was a engineer with dad. Blondie Vine was on the Seastone or Rockstone then went into the Rigging loft in the yard. Willy Ross was a mate on the dredgers. Eric Brockway was the launch operator. Wally Cluett. was a mate with dad who died trying to get back onboard when they were tied up in Newcastle. The "James 81" used to collect the sewage from the sewage farms and take it out to dump in the Solent. (Best job in the fleet some used to say).
Dad recalls Jonny Macglochlin who was a mate on the "Goodworker" in Doha when he noticed a crack in the bucket ladder and was about to break. He managed to stop operations and saved the bucket chain from parting and going over the top.
Humour me Eric as dad and I ramble on. It brings a glint to his eyes when I update him. Look forward to any replys.
Ray

Ericof_t110
24th January 2013, 17:51
Fred Ward ran the "Pintail",his eyes were red and watery like a bloodhound,nice bloke,he used to run bets ashore from the "Dibden Bay"for Johnny Walker and Peter Tucker.I remember Frank Judd,and Knocker White used talk about Blondie Vine.Expect Dad will also recall Jack Hayes,engineer on dredgers etc.Worked with Willy and John Mac.on several jobs in UK.Whenever "James 81"laid up,they used to send her 'cargo' to us on "Carnroe" at Marchwood,in open barges to be pumped ashore.We were paid time and a 'third'(have I spelt that right)?There was a nice natural allotment growing ashore there which Joe Duell appreciated.Remember him?
Best regards to all
Eric

granty
24th January 2013, 19:49
Hi
In 1968 I spent a few weeks in the Rockstone Master B Tanner then the Seastone Master H Force ? Then I went to a hopper James No ?that was prospecting for new sand banks for dredging to sell ashore we were of Le havre taking samples of the bottom and bagging it marking it then we moved up to off Oostend then we went into Harwich taking samples of the bottom all round the Harbour to see if the spoil could be sold when they dredge to make way for bigger ships then we went to Dublin to do the same job but I can't remember the number of the Hopper can anyone remind me please
Regards
Granty

Ray the lecky
24th January 2013, 19:59
The "James 96" was the one converted from a hopper to a gravel boat. Her sister was the "James 95"
Ray

Ray the lecky
24th January 2013, 20:46
Further. The James 96 was renamed 'Merstone"
Ray

JohnMac068
25th January 2013, 06:10
I was on the James 95 doing that sort of gravel prospecting, using a Hydralift, probably about 1965/6. We worked all round the Isle of Wight, then up to the Mersey, eventually to Denmark, looking for the right "stuff" for the expansion of Copenhagen Airport.

Ray the lecky
25th January 2013, 20:35
Granty.
Just talked with my father (Sam Jupe) and he said that it was the "James 95" that did the prospecting work. He couldn't remember the skipper's name but said that he stepped ashore in Ireland, sat on a bollard to roll a cigarette an fell over and died. He was a good guy apparently. I hope that I haven't confused you with my previous posts.
Regards.
Ray

granty
25th January 2013, 22:20
Hi Ray
We had only been in Dublin a few days and I went home I can't remember the Masters name the only two crew I can remember and it's not names is the One of the ABs come from Gravesend and the cook was a cook out of The Ffyes banana boats he used to play losers crib it was good fun but he boiled the tea towels and his under ware on the galley stove each evening. the flushing pump on the toilet did not work so there was a 45 gallon drum on deck so you could flush the loo with a bucket. It was summer time when I was in her and we worked from 0400 till 2000 each day some times you worked in the hold or on the windless you would drop the anchor pay out all the cable. Take a sample heave in a shackle take another sample and so on. Great fun
Cheers
granty

Ray the lecky
10th February 2013, 07:27
I recall a Dutch engineer on either the 95 or 96. He was a big blonde feller and used to be a heavy weight boxer. His name was Tony Veerling I think. He eventually worked in the fitting shop where he had an accident whilst bending pipe. Apparently he had packed sand in the pipe and put a bung in both ends, then heated the pipe to bend it. The sand was wet so that when it was red hot it blew the bung out and into his eyes. Nobody could get near him to help but Alf Marlow got him to the hospital where they saved his sight. That company saw its share of accidents in those days.
Anyone remember Jack Tomkins and his finger loss in the fan of the welding plant in Marchwood?
Ginger Barrett used to tell the story of when he worked with Jack as his greaser. One day Jack was painting with white paint and Ginge swapped the tin for red lead. Jack dipped his brush in without looking and managed a couple of stokes before realizing. Good thing that Ginge was a big guy.
Cheers.
Ray

Ericof_t110
10th February 2013, 13:49
Jack Tomkins was chief on F Soton and Ginger Barret his greaser yes,
Coor Cross,we used to call him Gorden,was the Dutch master,George
Coward was his mate at that time.Jack was made floating supt.a few years later.He was checking all shore plant for anti-freeze,he apparently
topped up the one at Marchwood,had it running for a while then put his
hand in checking for leaks,forgetting it was running. I think he lost 3 or 4
fingers,he came back to work for a while before retiring shortly after.
The F Soton did the Calshot Consortium job in early 60's,with F101,F102, HAM Hoppers 581,2,3 and4, the Simoun,Sirocco,95 or 96,
W.D.54"African Queen",I was on HAM 581, with Ian "Lofty" Anderson the
Master.Ginger Ryan was on deck with me, Paddy Cleary in E.R. Other names I recall are Bill Swinsted,Bob McKenzie,Joe Davis,Jack Alford,
Dave Evans(E.R.) Paddy McGratten.During the winter the sea water was freezing the ropes if we didn't get them below smartly.

R58484956
10th February 2013, 17:35
Tony V a very nice chap. I think it was Jack Tomkins was chief on the Shemara(Sir Bernard Docker, Boss of BSA) His wife Nora a down to earth lady she called Jack " a bald headed old Bas**** " he said " I am not old" and left the ship. Ron Hampton also sailed on the Shemara

Ray the lecky
17th February 2013, 04:45
Today we were talking about the "Top Up", bunker barge. We could not remember the name of the steam barge that it replaced. Any ideas? I think the skipper's name was Bert.
Thanks.
Ray

Ericof_t110
23rd February 2013, 12:34
The "Hauler" or "Hawler" was bunker ship,Ray,her Master was called
"Old Mac" MacDonald and the ship was used for shifting moorings,delivering stores etc.There was an old boilerman called Albert
MacDonald around at that period, not sure if they were related.
Eric.
PS. Skipper of "Top Up" was Albert Burton known as Bert,you were right.

peterlock
11th March 2013, 17:31
Read all the threads about james dredging, and know all the people mentioned. Worked on WD Asia on the western docks.

peterlock
11th March 2013, 17:35
Fred Ward ran the "Pintail",his eyes were red and watery like a bloodhound,nice bloke,he used to run bets ashore from the "Dibden Bay"for Johnny Walker and Peter Tucker.I remember Frank Judd,and Knocker White used talk about Blondie Vine.Expect Dad will also recall Jack Hayes,engineer on dredgers etc.Worked with Willy and John Mac.on several jobs in UK.Whenever "James 81"laid up,they used to send her 'cargo' to us on "Carnroe" at Marchwood,in open barges to be pumped ashore.We were paid time and a 'third'(have I spelt that right)?There was a nice natural allotment growing ashore there which Joe Duell appreciated.Remember him?
Best regards to all
Eric

We used to call Ward cods eyes or poached eggs in a bucket of blood.

sandman
23rd March 2013, 12:50
Was chatting to Frank James yesterday, He is certanly looking alot better than the last time I saw him. Must be all the sunny holidays him and and his wife are having.

sandman
22nd May 2013, 08:57
I was informed last night, that Frank James passed away suddenly at home.Early yesterday morning.

R58484956
24th May 2013, 13:11
RIP Frank

Ray the lecky
30th July 2013, 04:58
I was recently told about a tug tied up in Campbell River, Canada named GLENGARY. Today I went and took some pictures of her. She was renamed from TROJAN. Sure enough I knew her as soon as I walked along the dock. When she first came into James yard she was just a shell and we fitted her out. She still has the 750 Lister Blackstone. I couldn't find the operator but was told that she is now owned by General Towing. Painted on her was "Glengary Vancouver BC"
One of the things that the boilermakers had to do was to cut down the centre window because the skipper couldn't see the deckhand forward when they were running anchors. She is being worked on to be put back into service. The picture files are too big to post so I will compress them and post in the future. I'd like to know if she sailed across to Canada or if she came on a transporter back in the early 80's.
Ray

Ray the lecky
30th July 2013, 05:59
Here is the Glengary (Trojan)36590

Ericof_t110
24th August 2013, 20:47
Hi Ray,good to hear from you again,I crewed on Trojan for a few weeks
with Len Whitlock (capt) and Ben Nye (driver).We run around the coast
from Soton to Shearness,and worked that area.Bob McKenzie was also on board as run skipper.We ran barges up and down The Medway and The Thames to Gravesend and Tilbury. Eric.

Ray the lecky
24th August 2013, 22:58
Hi Eric, likewise, it is good to see your reply. Dad asks if there is anything on the computer when I see him so this will be good for him. He too recognized the Trojan when I showed him the pictures. He spent some time on her as well. I will remind him of the names that you listed.
She looked pretty banged up with a lot of rust but they must have thought that she is viable as they are fixing her up. I will keep an eye out for her once she is running.
Regards. Ray

TC2
24th August 2013, 23:25
Following earlier points mentioned, I should have stated that the 'Deepstone' was renamed the 'ARCO HUMBER' in during its ARC ownership. It is still operational, and you can frequently track its movements on the internet with AIS. Also the 'Bankstone' had a bad fire aboard, which I believe started in one of its cabins, and it was later sold for scrap. The 'Marinestone' (later Arco Tees), if I remember correctly, was badly damaged after an explosion by underwater ordanance which incurred whilst it dredged somewhere off Lowestoft. I believe it was later towed for scrap to Belgium

The ARCO TEES was severly damaged by the explosion. The main engines were blown off the engine beds and the bridge and superstucture were moved backwards several inches by the explosion.
The pumps from the ARCO TEES were used on shore at Sizewell B Power Station during the construction phase, The dredger was moored off shore and the aggregate was pumped into a lagoon for processing into sand and gravel. Unexploded ordnance came ashore several times.

awateah2
1st September 2013, 22:17
I was informed last night, that Frank James passed away suddenly at home.Early yesterday morning.

Hi was chatting with friends that knew Frank and we could not agree on his age, Any ideas ???????????? regards

Ericof_t110
11th February 2014, 16:17
Hi Eric, likewise, it is good to see your reply. Dad asks if there is anything on the computer when I see him so this will be good for him. He too recognized the Trojan when I showed him the pictures. He spent some time on her as well. I will remind him of the names that you listed.
She looked pretty banged up with a lot of rust but they must have thought that she is viable as they are fixing her up. I will keep an eye out for her once she is running.
Regards. Ray

Hi there Ray the lecky,hope you are well,how's things with Trojan?
I've been having PC problems,hopefully now sorted.



ky,not having been in touch for a while,had problems signing in lately.Hope all's well your end. Happy New Year.

jonnyoldboy
28th July 2014, 18:03
Hi , Anyone remember John Hay who retired in the early 70s. Scottish guy.... he was my mother's step father !! He worked out of Woolston(Southampton)....

Ericof_t110
28th July 2014, 20:34
I worked with Jack Hay,a steam engineer, on several jobs for James. Last I heard of Jack,Someone told me he had "taken charge" of
a bar on a cross channel ferry.That quite a few years ago,and probably
just a "story". He was a Scot and well liked,very good at his job.
Ericof

Ray the lecky
22nd November 2014, 06:01
Hi Eric. Just to let you know that my dad Sam Jupe passed away on 18th November 4 weeks before his 97th birthday. My brother has sent an article to the Portsmouth News naming dad as the last survivor of the sinking of the PS Portsdown. It is too big a file to download here Regards. Ray

Ericof_t110
23rd November 2014, 18:41
Hi Ray,sorry to hear of Sam passing on,my wife and I were recently talking about when I worked in Ireland on the "AFRICA" Sam was Master of "F101",I did the run back to James yard on the "F102"with George Flood.I shall look out for your article in "Portsmouth News"Thanks for letting me know, Best Wishes,Eric.