Photography at fishing ports

Steve Farrow
22nd June 2007, 11:01
This morning I applied to renew my visitor/photography pass for use on Grimsby fish docks which are owned by ABP but managed by Grimsby Fish Dock Enterprises. Although I haven't been stopped as yet, I was told that several people with cameras have been kicked off the docks. All passes for the commercial ports were withdrawn last year and it doesn't seem that these will be issued in the future, which seems sad as history of shipping will not be recorded.
I understand that it was the events of 9/11 which prompted tightening security measures at all our ports and airports. However it seems that photographers are now allowed to photograph aircraft as long as permits are carried.
What experiences have others had relating to this issue?

Passes for Grimsby fish dock can be obtained fron GFDE Ltd.
Regards
Steve

Gavin Gait
22nd June 2007, 11:08
We don't have that problem up in Scotland Steve. The only port I have near me that i'd need a pass for is Aberdeen ( which I believe is reasonably easy to get as long as you apply in plenty of time to the Harbour Masters office ). You can walk freely around Peterhead , Fraserburgh , MacDuff , Buckie , Scrabster , etc and provided you have a hard hat and rig boots you can even go onto the slipways to take close up photo's of the boats ( again provided you ask permission from the foreman ).

For the big commercial docks I can see the need to control access , especially with cameras , as a complete photographic record of the docks could be of use to a terrorist cell planning an attack ( they could spot a weakness in the security , etc ). In saying that however provided you can provide enough evidence to the Port Control Office that your only interest is in the ships themselves they should ammenable to letting you down ( you might have to agree to show them all the photo's taken on the preview screen of a Digital Camera tho ).

Davie(Thumb)

Steve Farrow
22nd June 2007, 11:32
I understand that the directive came from Europe so it isn't solely ABP, but I suppose it's with what gusto it is enforced.
I worked for ABP for many years including a period as a lock gateman at both commercial and fish dock, so I am known personally to the authorities locally.
When photography was banned at airports, some of the regular photographers put the case that they knew the geography of the areas inside out as many were there almost on a daily basis and as such would be amongst the first to spot anyone acting suspicious! They suggested that they could carry ID cards with thier photo's attached. Some of the airports conceded and now permit photography in a sensible controlled way.

As for the ports, many seafarers see the threats (?) are more likely to come from inbound shipping as opposed to getting on to the docks via the gates. Many foreign sailors can be seen wondering off the ships at will.
The bottom line is I suppose, that the ports are private property and we aren't wanted.......just a liability. What is irritating is the way the blanket ban was done.
Regards
Steve

sparkie2182
22nd June 2007, 11:42
i was hydrographic surveyor for abp when the dock system was open house.
these days.....surrounded by razor wire.......c.c.t.v...........etc:

a sign of the times maybe............

Steve Farrow
22nd June 2007, 12:01
i was hydrographic surveyor for abp when the dock system was open house.
these days.....surrounded by razor wire.......c.c.t.v...........etc:

a sign of the times maybe............

A sign of the times indeed...............Parents can't even take group photo's of their kids at school now. But I did read where one headmaster said that if any parent objected to their child being photographed in a group.....would they please remove that child so that the majority of parents can get on with it!
Common sense at last.
Here in GY fish docks there is very little left now. The new fish market hardly sees any vessels....we are down to two anchor seiners and a few pocket trawlers with the odd French and Dutch trawler occasionally and security cameras are everywhere!
Regards
Steve

Ali N
22nd June 2007, 12:32
All the nonsense comes under the ISPS code which makes all ports throughout the world responsible for security of the port and the vessels contained within. Some ports are not as stringent as others, but generally take at as being any vessel ebgaged in foriegn voyages over 500gt that berths in the port will be secured. An example would be that when a passenger vessel anchors of Portree the passenger landing point will be fenced off and any persons wanting access to that area will have to be on the passenger list or approved by the vessel master.
The areas of Aberdeen that do not engage in international shipping are not really fenced off, which to be fair makes it the fish dock and that is about it. Although i am surethey have plans that once they get the boats out they can get that fenced off as well.
Peterhead is a bit strange in that international shipping berths in areas where the pelagic vessels are is not fence but access to the tanker terminal and asco base is.
ISPS was a security code pushed for by the americans and accepted by IMO and is now implemented worldwide

Gavin Gait
22nd June 2007, 12:39
They do close off the pier beside the Pelagic plant in Peterhead when large non-UK vessels berth there. They usually just say it because they're working heavy lifting gear but sometimes all they do is put up a 6ft high fence around the ships embarkation ladder and put a small watchmans hut that you have to get clearance from to get to the ship.

Steve Farrow
22nd June 2007, 13:46
The sad part about the ban on cameras hits home in as much that had a similar directive been issued years ago we wouldn't be looking at the marvellous images in this great web site.
I think being born in 1946 was very fortunate for me! With all the laws that are creeping in to control us even more, I don't envy the younger generation....only their youth!!!
Regards
Steve

wully farquhar
22nd June 2007, 14:43
Exactly Steve,that is the only thing that i envy of the younger generation is their youth and energy.The thing is the younger generation don't know any different,thats the law and get on with it!!,in other words maybe we had the cream of it!!! lol
Regards,------Wully

Steve Farrow
22nd June 2007, 14:59
Hi Wully........Pleasure trips on coal-fired steam trawlers at the age of thirteen. What an adventure! If we had any ships left here, Health & Safety wouldn't permit it.
I learned to sail in 14' dinghys (Albacores) in our Alexander Dock here in GY at the age of 14. Now it has to be done correctly by joining a yacht club or similar....not a bad idea but not cheap! We used to sail in the Humber across to Spurn Point. Now the Cleethorpes Council have put steel gates across all the access points to the beach. You must provide certificates of boat handling and cough up £15 a time.
I bought a packet of salted peanuts last week ( wrong because they are bad for my cholesterol) and the wording said.....This product may contain nuts.
It isn't the nuts that are nuts!
Regards
Steve

sparkie2182
22nd June 2007, 17:36
as a point of balance.................

in the 5 years i was with abp..........i helped fish 2 members of the public out of the dock dead.
they both used the closed lock gates as part of a "rat-run" between the pub and home.........late dark night....full of booze..........doesnt take much imagination to figure the rest.

i have to admit on reflection.....the way litigation is these days.....with t.v. adverts every 15 minutes begging people to sue for damages........
if i owned a port......it would be the razor wire and cctv for me also.

best regards............

wbeedie
23rd June 2007, 00:07
Even Kyle of Lochalsh fences of the (railway)pier sometimes when boats come into load logs but would say that is for HSE rules rather than anything else

sparkie2182
23rd June 2007, 01:14
yes...........wbeedie.........

i agree..........

and the hsa have the final say.............

best regards to scotia......from cumbria