Dominion Monarch

RoyVK4CAT
17th March 2005, 08:38
Does anyone remember the Dominion Monarch with her four Doxford engines and four screws? A dirty, smelly old girl down in the engine room. You only had to step into there to be covered in diesel oil, you just could not keep clean no matter what!!! But a good old workhorse all the same.

Doug Rogers
17th March 2005, 09:42
I do remember her, launched 27 July 1938, and I think I even have a picture or two if you are lucky.Stay tuned!!

Doug Rogers
18th March 2005, 03:10
Shaw Saville & Albion's imposing Motor Vessel Dominion Monarch, the most powerful motor vessel built when completed in 1939.

cassim
18th March 2005, 08:15
Thankyou Doug for this lady. The only QSMV that I knew. When I was a youngster I travelled up from Ashburton to visit her at Lyttelton shortly before she was withdrawn. My overwhelming memory is of the wonderful heraldic shields up around the walls of the smokeroom. It is a shame now that a young person cant get near a wharf nowadays and getting on board a ship is impossible The first ship I ever saw was the "Persic" at Timaru in the mid 50's and I had the opportunity to go on board "Essex" about 6 months later - from then on I was hooked!
Selwyn

Doug Rogers
18th March 2005, 08:47
She is an interesting vessel, one in as much she was just completed before the advent of WW2 and never entered service until nearly ten years after her completion. Two that she was designed to carry a relatively small number of passengers for her size, although of course her cargo capacity was not inconsiderable.Three that they chose the engines that they did and that they were as powerful as they were. Whatever I just wish they made them like that these days, she has a certain balance to the profile, not beautiful, a sense of power certainly and quite imposing close up...well in my view!!.
And I agree that its a shame that young people today stand no chance of doing what we obviously did..prodigious ship visiting!!...and believe it or not the Persic was one of the vessels that I did see visit in UK. Its a small world after all!!.

flyer682
18th March 2005, 10:34
Timaru?? A place I know very well Cassim. The world gets even smaller.

julian anstis
18th March 2005, 11:04
The DM or Dominion Maniac as she was known amongst the crew's had built up quite a reputation. Apparently as soon as the name Dominion Monarch was chalked up on the board, it put the Fear of Christ into seafarer's and emptied every shipping office in the U.K. within seconds. Some of this was due to the crew accomadation being totally unbearable in the tropics, which being only two feet above the sea meant that the port's had to stay closed. Even in a calm sea, the slightest ripple would enter the port and flood the cabins. Such was the extent of crew not wanting to sail on her, she tended to end up with the more unsavoury characters of the shiping fraternity crewing her. Her last trip was to the USA at Seattle World Fair where she was used as a floating hotel in 1962 and in November of that year she sailed for Japan and the breakers. 23 years service she covered over 1,500,000 miles for her owners and her bell can be seen at the Riverdale School near Gisborne NZ.

Doug Rogers
18th March 2005, 22:19
Thanks for that interesting perspective on her and I just love the alternate name!!. Perhaps we may even see a picture of her bell at sometime in the future!!!.

julian anstis
18th March 2005, 22:39
Maybe Flyer could pop in with his camera when he's passing Doug!.....If we say please...?

flyer682
18th March 2005, 22:42
Maybe Flyer could pop in with his camera when he's passing Doug!.....If we say please...?
Hahaha. (:D)
I've never been to Gisborne, but I suppose it's a good excuse to go there.......

Doug Rogers
19th March 2005, 00:43
Oh hell even I have been to Gisborne..what is this anyway...only once though and many years ago..would be interesting to see what it is like now..ah well next NZ trip I'll put it on the list!!. And David is welcome to pop in with his camera anytime..and the results of his labours come to that.

marapito
27th March 2005, 00:46
She might well have been Hell for the crew, but I'll vouch for the fact that she was Heaven for the passengers. No liner or cruise ship since has afforded so much space per passenger or such a munificent crew to passenger ratio.

All of the accommodation was en-suite staterooms (something unusual for 1939) and I blame the seven week voyage to Wellington via South Africa and Australia (with a Daimler in her hold) for an enduring passion.

Doug Rogers
27th March 2005, 05:05
Hope you enjoyed the photo of her in the Gallery....Cheers..Doug

Edith Kern
6th April 2005, 03:13
If memory serves me correctly she was generally refered to as "The Bucket of Blood"
Her last call at Wellington was celebrated with a farewell ball at the Majestic cabaret,
I was a little young at this stage, but one of my older sisters attended this event!
I do remember the photographs in the "TRUTH' of some of the girls in their best frocks, perhaps someone else remembers this!

jinxie
6th April 2005, 05:27
We were in port with the DM when she was paying off to go for scrap and attended one of the many parties. Actually the word "party" was somewhat a euphemism. (as all Engineers will be aware)
When I came shoreside I found that the last C/Eng on the DM John Noble, (MI.MarE) lived just down the road from me (still does) and at the time he was senior marine surveyor for the East Coast North Island (NZ).

marapito
6th April 2005, 05:47
Couple of large pics of her at

http://www.timetableimages.com/maritime/images/shawpc4.htm

trotterdotpom
14th July 2005, 11:11
Received a letter yesterday (13/7/05) with an Australian 50c stamp featuring a Shaw Saville poster from yesteryear, showing "Dominion Monarch". Looked it up on www.autraliapost.com.au and stamp was issued 22.2.05 and will be withdrawn 31.08.05.

John T.

fred henderson
14th July 2005, 18:03
The Dominion Monarch was undoubtedly an all time classic but I found Marapito's claims for her passengers having the best ever space and service interesting and it stimulated me into some quick research.
The Dominion Monarch was 27,155 tons, carried 517 passengers, with a crew of 385. The simple ratios are 52.52 tons per passenger and 1.34 passengers per crew member.
The Hapag flagship Europa is generally regarded as the best in the business today; 28,437 tons, with 408 passengers and 245 crew. Clearly Europa has far more space per passenger than the DM - 69.7 tons per passenger and no cargo carried - but at 1.67 passengers per crew member the personal attention may be less, depending on the effects of automation.
Without a doubt travelling as a passenger on board DM must have been a very satisfactory experience.

Fred

warwick
16th July 2005, 04:45
I was one of those 385 crew between 1950 and 1952, and again for a voyage in 1955. For all her reputation as a first class passenger ship, her principal role was as a large cargo refrigerated cargo liner. She discharged and loaded in one NZ port (Wellington) until about 1951 when she began to alternate between Auckland and Wellington. And on my final voyage in her, in 1958/59, we called to Lyttelton. Whether or not calls had been made to Lyttelton in the years between !955 and my last voyage I don't know. As for a pleasant experience for the passengers, that could be said of the voyages after old Sir Henry Gordon handed over command and retired in about 1951. He, being of the old school (he probably served some time in sail!) insisted on 'running the easting down' between Cape Town and Fremantle, and all on board experienced some pretty miserable weather on the fringes of the 'roaring forties'. Something not covered in the passengers' sailing brochures.

raybnz
17th September 2005, 04:58
I sailed under a Chief Engineer on the Cretic who had been aboard the DM when she was almost caught by the Japs when they took over Singapore.. Evidently they had all engines in bits and were in drydock when the Japs came knocking at the door.. He told me they first got one engine going and once under way all hands worked on the other three engines. One by one they got all going and cleared Singapore safely.. The chief was from Australia and if my memory is right his surname was Muir.. As aussies goes I found him to be okay.

One of the skippers (John Hurst)on the William C Daldy here in Auckland sailed on the DM as 2nd mate.

Aldinga
17th September 2005, 08:07
Hello to every one I’am new member an old Vindi boy now living “down under”. I could not let it pass without adding to story of the great DM. I joined her according to my discharge book in KG5 in Oct 57 did three trips on her as a steward in the leading hands mess. Homeward bound we used to grab what overtime we could get and one way was that we would sogee the bulkheads of the leading hands cabins.
We went it to one cabin which had the bulkhead covered with photos of the leading hands family which we proceeded to remove. Well that’s when the preverbal hit the fan we were accused of not showing respect and condemning his family to eternal damnation. We where told that we where not required for the next trip I was sorry as I was quite happy on her.
Ron

R58484956
17th September 2005, 10:08
Welcome to SN Aldinga, you are now amongst the sea loving fraternity, enjoy the site,

Ivor Lloyd
17th September 2005, 17:59
I sailed as Radio officer on the Dominion Monarch 1944-1946. Two outstanding memories I have are - we were repatriating Australian and New Zealanders who were on an exchange Prisoner of War scheme (early 1945 ?) and on coming aboard in Liverpool there was a revolt by a certain number who were not satisfied with the accommodation provided. (Troop Decks). it seems that they were on the DM in the early part of the war before she was converted for Troop carrying and they came over to the UK in relative luxury. If my memory serves me right several "Top Brass" came on board to sort things out and it resulted in some 30 or so being taken off. What happened to them I dont know.
I then remember another voyage when we sailed from the UK after the war in Europe was over we were then lit up like a Christmas Tree crossing the Atlantic but on reaching the Panama Canal bound for Australia and NZ it was back to "Black out" and into the war again.
Does anyone remember Capt Sir Henry Gordon ?
Happy days
Ivor R297868

neil maclachlan
18th September 2005, 17:54
Hi Shipmates,
Your description of the DM bring back memories to me ,we were tied up in Wellington during the Wharfies strike in 1951. We were there for nearly six months,so much so that my scottish brigue was going Kiwi? I used to watch the DM coming and going and would feel very homesick,the strike never held her up. Also, question? I was led to believe the MV Georgic was the biggest motor ship in the world?

Peter Eckford
27th March 2006, 16:21
Hello Ivor LLoyd. I was on the DM jusu before you. I remember Capt. Sir Henry Gordon DSC very well. Iwas with him before on the Wairangi and left her just in time as she was sunk in the Malta convoy. He followed me to the DM one trip later. An amazing character. I wonder if you have a pic of the DM in her wartime grey? I am still searching.

Cheers, Peter E.

daveyjones
27th March 2006, 16:46
I was on the Dominion Maniac on her second to last trip sailing from London 8th August 1961 as AB. She was a fine looking vessel but had a bad name in NZ. On arrival in Lyttelton we had a battle with the NZ Navy up the main street and I missed the vessel at sailing time. All in my book 'Oceans Of Time' due in the NZ book shops mid August.

Sebe
27th March 2006, 16:57
Wasn't it the DM that, on final departure from the NZ coast, a local newspaper printed a stern view of her under the caption "Danger - keep clear, twin screw" following activities on the coast??

daveyjones
27th March 2006, 17:20
I was not on the last trip but I am not surprised the local rag would post a message like that. Unfortunately there was another vessel with a bad name, Donaldson liner, Captain Cook that arrived in Lyttelton on the same day as the DM and thus the battle with NZ navy.

Aldinga
29th March 2006, 05:20
Here you are Doug the DM’s bell jury rigged at the “Vindi Boys” reunion in Napier NZ 2004

DMBell.jpg

Aldinga
29th March 2006, 05:42
The DM's Bell

PKiddell
29th March 2006, 10:04
Hi Raybnz, at A&G Price we worked on the DM's engines,plenty of pistons to pull. Remember the 2nd being an Aussie bloke, with a loud voice not surprising on that ship. We fitters stayed on for engine trials and it was amazing to see the engine room staff scatter when the Big Chief arrived on the top platform they all found something of interest to do!!!. Remember when the ship had her name in the papers over onboard activites,she was berthed at Queens wharf which was descibed at as very appropiate,a shame that incident stuck to her name .

Peter Eckford
29th March 2006, 13:03
As a junior officer on the bridge telegraphs (quadruple screw ) while leaving port I got the order from Sir Henry " half ahead both starboard outers ".
I was rather scared at having to question his orders.
On another occasion a Panama Canal pilot decided to tell Sir Henry his opinion of Hitler in a long string of co**** obsenities. When Sir Henry had smartly moved to the other side of the bridge I had to explain to the Pilot that Sir Henry belonged to the Plymouth Brethren and we did even dare to say damn in his presense.

Peter E.

Ivor Lloyd
29th March 2006, 20:35
Re Sir Henry . I remember we were anchored off Bombay when Sir Henry decided to have a full scale Boat Drill. If memory serves me right he was advised that there was a very strong current but away all boats it was. I can remember being in my allocated boat which had "Barmaids Handles" and there we were feverishly jerking these as the DM disappeared into the distance. It took the best part of the day for the motor launches to recover all the lifeboats....
Because I was under the age of 21 he forbade that I should be able to purchase any Spirits.
Ivor

haggis29
30th March 2006, 14:03
Shaw Saville & Albion's imposing Motor Vessel Dominion Monarch, the most powerful motor vessel built when completed in 1939.


I sailed on the DM from 1950 to 1954.

Jimmy.

haggis29
30th March 2006, 14:07
I sailed as an engineer on the DM from 1950 to 1954. Great ship.

Jimmy.

raybnz
15th October 2006, 19:32
I sailed under a Chief Engineer on the Cretic who had been aboard the DM when she was almost caught by the Japs when they took over Singapore.. Evidently they had all engines in bits and were in drydock when the Japs came knocking at the door.. He told me they first got one engine going and once under way all hands worked on the other three engines. One by one they got all going and cleared Singapore safely.. The chief was from Australia and if my memory is right his surname was Muir.. As aussies goes I found him to be okay.

One of the skippers (John Hurst)on the William C Daldy here in Auckland sailed on the DM as 2nd mate.

Yesterday I met John Hurst (14-10-06)at a meeting on the W C Daldy and he corrected my statement about the position he held on board this beautiful. Sorry John about the misquote. I have altered the mistake.

Weagle
24th October 2006, 10:54
Hello Ivor LLoyd. I was on the DM jusu before you. I remember Capt. Sir Henry Gordon DSC very well. Iwas with him before on the Wairangi and left her just in time as she was sunk in the Malta convoy. He followed me to the DM one trip later. An amazing character. I wonder if you have a pic of the DM in her wartime grey? I am still searching.

Cheers, Peter E.
There is a picture here on the Dm in war time colours.
Cheers.

http://www.nzmaritime.co.nz/dm01.htm

Weagle
24th October 2006, 11:03
More pictures and history of her here.

http://www.nzmaritime.co.nz/dm01.htm

non descript
4th January 2007, 23:35
Whilst normally unkeen to provide automatic links to other site without some reason, this site, maintained by The NZ National Maritime Museum as a service to Shipping Enthusiasts and Maritime Historians does deserve some serious credit, along with the very interesting images of Dominion Monarch

We are not only very grateful, but very lucky that the NZ National Maritime Museum has made such a generous effort to provide free access to these treasures and we acknowledge their kindness and indeed copyright.

http://www.nzmaritime.co.nz/dm01.htm

non descript
5th January 2007, 07:41
On that NZ National Maritime Museum site, there is an image entitled London 1957, which to my mind is actually of rather poor quality, but that isolated image had been uploaded into Ships Nostalgia Gallery, way back in October 2005, as a stand alone addition by a Member who was seemingly unaware of the copyright.

As someone claiming the copyright has just asked for it to be removed, we have done so.

holmsey
5th January 2007, 18:10
Greetings Tonga

Many thanks for the link to a superb site, I agree with you about the quality of the image you mentioned, glad it was removed!

Jim H (Thumb)

Dave Lark
5th January 2007, 23:06
Hi all I also had the "honour" of shipping out on the D.M. in 1955 the skipper at the time was, I believe Capt Forbes-Moffat. I also sailed with him on the "Canopic"
The D.M. was a good sea ship. but Iwas told on joining her you don't sign on you weigh-in, I could be wrong but I thought she had a crew of 500 and carried 500 first class passengers. Seems she was a weell known ship in her time . Dave Lark (Auckland)

Old Growly
19th January 2009, 13:49
I sailed as Radio officer on the Dominion Monarch 1944-1946. Two outstanding memories I have are - we were repatriating Australian and New Zealanders who were on an exchange Prisoner of War scheme (early 1945 ?) and on coming aboard in Liverpool there was a revolt by a certain number who were not satisfied with the accommodation provided. (Troop Decks). it seems that they were on the DM in the early part of the war before she was converted for Troop carrying and they came over to the UK in relative luxury. If my memory serves me right several "Top Brass" came on board to sort things out and it resulted in some 30 or so being taken off. What happened to them I dont know.
I then remember another voyage when we sailed from the UK after the war in Europe was over we were then lit up like a Christmas Tree crossing the Atlantic but on reaching the Panama Canal bound for Australia and NZ it was back to "Black out" and into the war again.
Does anyone remember Capt Sir Henry Gordon ?
Happy days
Ivor R297868

Ivor
I have been researching some of my fathers journeys from his wage slips. I have one from 23/7/1946 to 1/11/1946 and it has the name H R Gordon Master on the bottom. Sadly my father Keith Harding passed away some time back but just wanted to acknowledge my finding of the Masters name

R396040
19th January 2009, 20:10
I sailed on DM as A/S in .June 1954 but due to disorientation caused by Cape Smoke in Capettown missed her there. Main memory the waiters uniforms jackets,thick red serge were very uncomfortable in the tropics and crew accommodation was pretty rough too. Wasnt too sorry and cleared my d/bk by doing a couple of trips on Braemar Castle which picked me up,much better proposition,,,,,

Stuart Henderson(*)) (*))

David JM
18th February 2009, 14:29
Well, Just found this forum. I too am an ex "Vindi Boy" - late 1961. Remember Mr. Woodcock, and Smithy the Deck Instructor? I nearly got a week put on my course at the final medical with the "Nurse" (Dragon, more like), 'cos I hadn't put on any weight !! Bloody place.... Bread-Crust and anti-w*nk for supper..........

Joined the Dominion Monarch at Tilbury for my very first trip (Saloon Boy) out of Southampton January 1962. Just seventeen and a half. It was her last trip, so all the departures were magnificent. I played guitar (a budding Tommy Steele, I'd hoped). Jack Purdey (one of the deck crew) also played. He taught me some valuable chords. It was a great trip, filled with new experiences. I remember seeing my first "queen" - "Rachel" and his/her friend "The Duchess". Thankfully I remained totally heterosexual and out of harm's way!!

I met "Rachel" many years later when I was playing guitar in a venue called "The Island Hotel and Country Club" in my home stamping grounds on the Isle of Sheppey.

I also recall a fellow Bell-boy, Alan Harvey. I think he went on to join the Oriana.

I remember that the DM was indeed a notorious vessel - most of the crew it seemed were "Double D-R's". I also recall that, while we were tied up in Mombasa, one of the deck crew fished with a hand-line over the rail. He was using a meat-hook and a lump of meat purloined from the galley. He landed a 300lb shark !!

Someone clambered down a Jacob's Ladder thrown over the side, and a ship's winch was used to get it on board. Photographs appeared in the Mombasa Times, and the shark was "sold" to a few of the locals - they must have lived for a couple of weeks on shark-meat!

The waiters used to contribute to a "Bell-Boys Fund" during the trip, to be shared out amongst us youngsters at the end. The Saloon Steward who was holding on to the cash took a shine to it, pocketed it - and blamed me !! I was given a damn good hiding by another of the Saloon Boys known as "Pepe".

An earlier post mentioned the crew-deck port-holes being just above the water-line. When I was first shown to my cabin and bunk (six guys per cabin!), I found myself with the top drawer just below the porthole. "That's convenient I thought". I soon found out why it had been left by the others!

To me, on reflection, one of the saddest parts was witnessing the laziness of the Saloon Stewards, who would have their meals on "Silver Service" from the passenger Dining Saloon, eat in their cabin, then dump the cutlery, salvers etc, through the port-hole! If that occured on other passenger vessels, the seabed must be littered with thousands of pounds' worth of silver-plate !!

The trip was a great experience, though, especially as she was so opulent.

I've got a few photo's in my loft, so when I can dig them out, I'll post them.

My next sailing was on the Rhodesia Castle. I'm off to have a look at her message board. Meanwhile, cheers for now, guys. David JM

brandane
22nd February 2009, 21:03
Very interesting to read all your comments about the DM - the ship had finished service by the time I join Shaw Savill ~ but I still enjoy reading all about her and of course seeing some of the magnificent photos of her.
I read recently from another website Clydeshipping, that Jim Monson, Engineer, who sailed on the DM in the 50's, passed away recently in Canada ~ I assume Jim was a Scot ~ therefore the reason his passing noted on the Scottish webpage. Some of you may have known or sailed with Jim.

Jamie
Shaw Savill Society
New Zealand

doric
5th April 2009, 14:37
My first deep sea voyage was on the DM as a junior Elect.Engr., in 1950, with Sir Henry Gordon as the Master, and Mr Gibson C.B.E. as the Chief Engineer, I did two voyages on the vessel.

She was at that time the largest motor vessel with four Doxford Engines, also had the largest refrigerated cargo capacity. She carried only 5oo first class passengers, was beautifully appointed, and did a service speed of 19 knots.

I understand the vessel was stuck in drydock in Singapore when the Japs were approaching, and all personnel in the docks deserted very quickly, leaving the ship's engineers to flood the dock and get away just before the Japs arrived.

The Master ( Henry Gordon ), was Knighted for this event, and the Chief Engineer ( Mr Gibson ) awarded the C.B.E.

Peter, if you want a picture of DM in her wartime grey livery, go to the following website :-

www.merchantnavyofficers.com/shawsavill2.html(A)

Regards, Terence Williams.

doric
5th April 2009, 14:58
Hello Fellow Welshman,

I was a little later than you, having sailed on the DM for two voyages 1950/51
as a junior Elect.Engr., Sir henry was the Master, and "gibby" C.B.E. was the Chief Engineer.

I enjoyed my time on this vessel, and then joined the Wairangi.

Born Swansea, served with Shaw Savill 1950/55 on following ships :-

Doric, Dominion Monarch, Wairangi, Taranaki, Gothic ( including Royal Commonwealth Tour 1953/54 ), Waiwera, Suevic.

Served with British Phosphate Commission 1955/59 on following ships :-

Triaster, Triadic.

Settled ashore in Melbourne Australia.in late 1959.

See my profile.

Iechyd Dda! Terence Williams. R538301.(A)

doric
5th April 2009, 15:08
Hello Julian,

I did two voyages on her in 1950/51, at that time we the crew ( I was an Elect Engr. ) knew her as the Demented Maniac, not the Dominion Maniac.

Regards, Terence Williams. R538301.(A)

doric
5th April 2009, 15:36
Hello Jinxie,

I also sailed with John Noble on the DM, but he was 3rd or 4th Engineer then ( 1950/51 ), and sailed on other vessels with him too. We are close friends, exchange correspondence. I was an Elect. Engr. in those days, but we still keep in touch.

Regards, Terence Williams. R538301.(A)

voyagerx1
5th April 2009, 17:08
I served on the Northern Star back in late '72 to '73, Xmas Cruise, 2 weeks, then arounbd the world trip with 3 cruises out os Sydney before sailing for home, The Ocean Monarch was our sister ship, out in Australia at the same time as we were back then, Remember hearing the Name Dominion Monarch and her alternative name 'Maniac', never got to see her myself though but on being offered the QE2 in late '73 I turned her down because of crew accomodation, prefering to ship out a galley/bakery crew on the Windsor Castle.. Seems some names do strike fear and loathing into ancient mariners.. Miss my time at sea now but then thats down to the gouvernment of the time scrapping the union and letting shipping companies hire on whom they pleased, cheap crews from the phiöipines, india, africa and china giving them bigger profit margins..Maggie Thatcher and her conservatives have an awfull lot to answer for.....

voyagerx1
5th April 2009, 17:22
(==D) Does anyone remember the Dominion Monarch with her four Doxford engines and four screws? A dirty, smelly old girl down in the engine room. You only had to step into there to be covered in diesel oil, you just could not keep clean no matter what!!! But a good old workhorse all the same.

Hi Roy, found this link and thought you might find it interesting... Ship Ahoy!!

http://www.ssmaritime.com/dominionmonarch.htm

sleeper67
23rd April 2009, 13:25
Hi my name is Adam and i'm in search of my grandfather who is unknown and believed to be an engineer on the DM, We got mentioned a possible name Ronald Simpson? who might have joined the crew from liverpool in 1948
My grandmother Rhoda Tamatea who is no longer with us, fell pregnant in wellington while working at a convent and would have been maybe 16 or 17. my mother was born on the 11/11/49. which means the DM must have been in wellington in march or late February 1949.

I know this might be a shot in the dark, but any information on names of engineers serving would be a big help to my search.

Thanks Adam
adam_maz84@hotmail.com

K urgess
23rd April 2009, 14:36
Welcome aboard, Adam.
I've removed your email address because this is a partly public forum.
Please use the private message facility to contact other members.
A bit of a longshot after all these years but best of luck.
Enjoy the voyage.

Reg Pharaoh
14th May 2009, 12:03
Hi, Great to be accepted.I was on the "Dominion Monarch from 4/1/40 until
27/12/42,Had some great times on board. Any other members there during this time ?

doric
14th May 2009, 13:20
I sailed as an Electrical Engineer on Dominion Monarch for two voyages 1950/51, with Sir Henry Gordon as Captain.

She was known as the Demented Maniac, by the crew, not Dominion Maniac.

When in Dry dock in Singapore, the dockyard workers deserted her, and the Engineers not only did quick engine repairs, but also flooded the drydock, enabling her to escape the Japs.

The captain received a Knighthood for this, ( Henry Gordon ), and the chief Engineer Gibson, ( not Muir ) received the CBE.

I had no complaints with this vessel, food was excellent, and whilst Sir Henry liked the roaring forties route, she was always a good sea ship.

I had two great voyages on this vessel, the biggest motor ship at the time with four doxfords, and also the biggest refrigerated cargo space.

So lay off this great ship, you characters, she did a wonderful job during World War 11, also in peace time, as many of her passengers will tell you.

As some have said the smoke room had a terrific atmosphere with all the heraldic shields.

She was the pride of the Shaw Savill Fleet, and in my mind always will be.

Regards, Terence Williams.

Ron Stringer
14th May 2009, 23:17
My father, with the rest of the 2nd Cheshire Regiment, sailed out to India in 1943 on the Dominion Monarch but they went around the Cape and stopped for a few days in Durban. He didn't have too much to say about the trip except that it was boring (the days were filled with training and drills, just like at boot camp) apart from the stopover at Durban.

He couldn't remember exactly where he disembarked in India. I suspect it would have been Bombay but, as the Regiment was intended to be part of the defence of Bengal/Calcutta from the Japanese troops then sweeping rapidly North and West through Burma, maybe it was somewhere on the Bay of Bengal.

Reg Pharaoh
2nd August 2009, 11:40
I was on the D.M. from 4/1/40 until 27/12/42. (Convoy collision,Singapore) etc .Anyone else.Interesting times

Rick Watson
6th August 2009, 09:21
After leaving Vindicatrix training ship in late 1961 I was detailed to go to KGV docks to Shaw Savill & Albion, then put on board the Dominion Monarch as a deck boy, being seamans' peggy for her last two trips to New Zealand, and Junior Ordinary Seaman on her final voyage through the Panama up the West Coast of the States and on to Seattle for the World State Fair in 1962. There she was to be a floating hotel before being sold for scrap. The Captain's name was, I think, Cap'n Fisher.
We had a grand reception going into Seattle Harbour, with fireboats spraying, bands playing on the wharf, thousands of people lining the wharf, and all us crew on stations, in the obligatory uniform, lined up on deck. When told to dismiss we all threw our hats over the side onto the wharf as souvenirs for the crowd. When onshore in Seattle, when people found out you were a crew member they took you into their hearts and homes and showed you around the area. We also had free entry into all the attractions at the Seattle World State Fair. Later we were transported by Greyhound Bus to Vancouver and put on a 4-prop aeroplane ("The Empress of Buenos Aires") to be flown back to England.
Rick Watson, New Zealand.

jonnyingram
11th December 2009, 20:10
When i was apprentice on the Medic we had engine breakdown in the Indian Ocean,between Aden and Freemantle,The Freemantle tug had to go up the coast to a Norwegian tanker so our tug came from Adelaide, The DM came to have a look and to see if we needed supplies.This was 1959.

ronn
3rd March 2011, 06:26
Fascinating to read stories and impressions of the DM. I was an 8 year old passenger on her in December 1951, sailing from Sydney to Cape Town with my mother and younger brother. Don't know if it was really justified but she had a reputation as a bit of a roller. 3 memories stand out. Watching waves break over the rear deck in a heavy storm; a passsengers' tour of the ship led by one of the officers; lunch one day in the children's dining room. The older boys (like 12 year olds) decided they would spurn the other food and just keep going back for another plate of soup. We younger ones thought this was fun idea and did likewise. Can't imagine the chef was too amused by this run on his soup and neglect of the main course and dessert he had prepared.

wavedweller
20th November 2011, 15:27
Hi Warwick, we possibly met on the D.M. as I joined her in London in May time 1959 and arrived back in the U.K. in the August. Wonderful trip for me as I had a chance to visit my relatives living in Mowbray St. Christchurch. Would you remember the ship making a sudden 360' turn in the Bay of Biscay to search for a dead body. I do!! Shhhhhhhh! less said the better.
regards
Colin

wavedweller
20th November 2011, 15:37
Hello Jonnyingram. A few weeks ago I posted a thread on that very ship. The question I asked would any-one know what that casualties name was. So it was the Medic and I have a poor photo of her when we came up close. Last I saw of her she seemed to be rolling her guts out. I was told she had shed her prop, is that right?
What a small world
best regards
Colin

Jocko
20th November 2011, 17:16
I remember the Dominion Monarch Wow 4 Doxfords, would there have 4 engineers on a watch. I was on the Waiwera and she had 2 engines with 3 engineers a watch. I find that story about her escape from Singapore very strange. If your doing engine repairs especially in wartime surely you would be doing one engine at a time, not all four together.
Someone else mentioned about how you can`t get into the harbours any longer to look at ships. In the good old days on a Sunday there was always people coming around with cars and shouting up, Any Welsh aboard, or Scots, Irish or name a city and take a few of us away and show us around. It was a great way to get to see places that we otherwise would have never seen. This wasn`t just in NZ as it happened all over.

Hugh Ferguson
20th November 2011, 17:37
I believe this is the Dominion Monarch in K.G.v Dry Dock

joshe
19th March 2012, 17:56
I did two trips on the D.M. from 18 sept. 1959 to 21 may 1960. She was a rough, tough ship but I enjoyed being on her and often wonder
about some of crew who were on her at that time. There were four lads Don Evans and three others who formed a group called the 'INITIALS'
and apparently did well in N.Z. when they left the ship. My cabin mate
John Daly became one of the top Hollywood film director/producers
producing PLATOON, THE TERMINATOR and several more and prior to this he was the boxing promoter who promoted the 'Rumble in the jungle' fight with Cassius Clay.
(Scribe)

Hugh Ferguson
19th March 2012, 18:51
Here's An Unusual View Of Said Ship.

averheijden
12th April 2012, 09:32
I sailed as an engineer on the DM from 1950 to 1954. Great ship.

Jimmy.

Jim,

Perhaps you can tell me the total engineers on board the DM, and how many every watch.
Maybe you have some stories (events) about the 4 DOXFORD's?

Regards
Alfons
(Retired Chief Engineer, Dutch Merchant Navy)

http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters

averheijden
13th April 2012, 09:03
Some pictures of the Dominion Monarch during Dry-Docking at WILTON-FIJENOORD, Rotterdam, November 1954

On the background on the river the Dutch Passenger Liner “NIEUW AMSTERDAM”

Regards
Alfons
http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters

averheijden
13th April 2012, 09:15
Some more info concerning the "QSMV DOMINION MONARCH"

A YouTube Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oq2lntONUBw

Regards
Alfons

kauvaka
13th April 2012, 09:45
Joshe, I wonder if they became Tony And The Initials. They were a group of young pommie lads who played in the Casa Fontana coffee bar in Wellington in the early sixties. One of them worked on the wharves as a tractor driver.

Duncan112
13th April 2012, 13:47
Start of a good Article on the DM in this months "Sea Breezes" to be continued next month.

A.D.FROST
13th April 2012, 14:45
DM engines must have been too much for one company that two were built at Doxfords(MACKEMS) and the other two by Swans(GEORDIES).A quote from Voyagerxl's web link"The Doxford Diesels is what made the ship tick like clockwork"It should mean a Stop Watch

averheijden
14th April 2012, 12:25
Arrangement of MACHINERY in "Q.S.M.V. DOMINION MONARCH"

Regards
Alfons
http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters

Somerton
14th April 2012, 13:20
I remember seeing the D M in Lyttleton in early 1959. I was AB on the Port Vindex.. I think at that time their was some trouble involving some of the crew. I think they referred to after hours drinking as sly groggin. Now you cannot get into the docks to see the ships. Changed times.

Alex C.

averheijden
16th April 2012, 15:32
"Q.S.M.V. DOMINION MONARCH"

Gentlemen,
First I must tell you that I have nothing personally with the DOMINION MONARCH, only with DOXFORD ENGINES
So, this ship with his 4 DOXFORD Engines had always my great interest
I got some information from Mr. HUGH MARTIN which was Junior Engineer on the DM in 1954 while the DM was in Dry-Dock at Wilton-Fijenoord (Rotterdam) in November 1954

One picture is the full 12-4 Engine Room watch + 1 Electrician and 2 Refrigerating Engineers
Picture taken in December 1952 (West African Coast)
Hugh is the one on the bottom right, leaning on the rail.
John Nobel who was the third or possibly the junior second at that time and later became chief engineer is fifth down from the top.

The other picture is taken in dry-dock, while the Port Side inboard Tail shaft was taken out

Regards
Alfons
http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters

brandane
16th April 2012, 22:26
Hello Alfons

Very interested to read your entry to the Forum on DM today ~ I am not engineer and no interest in Doxfords ~ but interested to see John Noble in this photo of 1952. John is still one of our Shaw Savill Society members and had planned to attend our Picton reunion next week, but has now cancelled due health problem. I have forwarded your article and attached photo of the engineers to John's daughter, who can pass it on to John. I am sure John would be very interested to hear from Hugh Martin ~ if that can be arranged.
Many thanks for posting this article and photo.
Kind regards,
Jamie
Shaw Savill Society (NZ Branch)

spongebob
17th April 2012, 01:16
I see the mention of Hugh Martin, once Junior Engineer on the DM.
Ex Berkshire he settled in Wellington and formed a Heating and Ventilating business then during the 1980's was Managing director of Babcock NZ and a work associate of mine.
I believe that he is now retired in Auckland and last time I heard he was a keen Yachtsman.

Bob

KIWI
17th April 2012, 04:56
Don Evans now fully retired & living in Otaki forty or fifty K notrh of Wellington.KIWI

Jane Astridge
17th April 2012, 08:53
Hi, am John Nobles daughter, i am sure he would be pleased for any information from his old shipmates. Sadly he had a stroke in January and has not recovered well enough to make the reunion in Picton, or live in his own home.
Jane

HEM
17th April 2012, 10:52
Hi, am John Nobles daughter, i am sure he would be pleased for any information from his old shipmates. Sadly he had a stroke in January and has not recovered well enough to make the reunion in Picton, or live in his own home.
Jane

Hi Jane nice to hear from you I live in Martaetai Beach AK How can I contact John.
HUGH

Jane Astridge
17th April 2012, 11:01
Hi Hugh, at this stage Dad is in 24 hour care in a rest home and has no fone in his room, he is not particularly "compus mentus" these days although he remembers a lot from his past.

He is at Mary Doyle, 3 Karanema Drive, Havelock North. Was only admitted there a week ago after 3 months in hospital. I am away in Oz from 23rd to 29th April, if you want to write to him, i will read him the letter, i'm sure he will remember you

Jane

Jane Astridge
17th April 2012, 11:08
I have work tomorrow so off to bed, we could always arrange time to chat in the "chat" room Hugh :o)

averheijden
17th April 2012, 15:52
L.S.
Suddenly a lot of activity on this DM topic, thanks to an old picture from Hugh

Sad to hear about the illness of his old Senior Engineer from the DM
Of course I do not know John Noble, but I hope for himself, his family and all his friends that he will recover soon from his illness.

In a way, we are comrades in arms because I was also Chief Engineer , but not on a ship with 4 DOXFORD’s and long sea voyages, but only on a General Cargo ships with the DOXFORD “LB type”
With sea voyages of maximum 1 week, and 1 or 2 weeks in port, so a lot of time for good maintenance

After his recovery I hope to have contact with him, probably he will and can tell me about the events and my questions about the 4 DOXFORD ENGINES of the DM

All the best for him
Alfons
(Retired Dutch Chief Engineer)
http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters

averheijden
27th April 2012, 08:56
CROSS SECTION OF THE “DOMINION MONARCH”

ENGINEROOM, AUXILIARY MOTOR ROOM and REFREGERATING COMPRESSORS

Approvel by: (New Zealand Maritime Record, http://www.nzmaritime.co.nz/dm01.htm ; Voyager NZ Maritime Museum.)

Regards
Alfons
http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters

averheijden
28th April 2012, 10:30
Some pictures from the Dominion Monarch with Officers, Engineers en Crew quarters

Approved by: (New Zealand Maritime Record, http://www.nzmaritime.co.nz/dm01.htm ; Voyager NZ Maritime Museum.)

Regards
Alfons
http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters

joshe
7th July 2012, 15:21
Kauvaka, just got back on to nostalgia and in answer to your query, yes they did become Tony and the Initials, can't remember Tony's surname but Don Evans and a Scots lad were in the group. I think they jumped ship and stayed in N.Z.

eriskay
7th July 2012, 16:07
Jim,

Perhaps you can tell me the total engineers on board the DM, and how many every watch.
Maybe you have some stories (events) about the 4 DOXFORD's?

Regards
Alfons
(Retired Chief Engineer, Dutch Merchant Navy)

http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters


Sadly, I have to tell you that the gentleman you were trying to contact, ex-3rd Engineer on the DM, passed away on 30th January 2009. Although we never ever met with each other, he became a very good friend over a period of some 6-7 years through a maritime website and, both being time-served marine engineers ex-Clydeside, Scotland, we had a lot in common. I miss our exchanges.

Great_Beyond
2nd January 2013, 04:53
Hey guys -

So I found a shoebox of old slides from the '62 worlds fair - one of them was labeled The Dominion Monarch. Knowing nothing about the slide, I hit the Google and found this thread. I dont have much other ship related stuff, but I thought I'd create an account to share this one shot

www.flickr.com/photos/tonyjcase/8336932486

david dunlop
1st April 2014, 21:25
I sailed as an engineer on the DM from 1950 to 1954. Great ship.

Jimmy.

I sailed on the D.M. as an A/B.in 1953/4 same time as yourself.It was not a very happy ship,poor feeder & a B.....d of a Harry Tate. can"t remember his name.a sad character.

Vernal
2nd April 2014, 05:30
The above mentioned Quote from Haggis 29 was from a gentleman by the name of Jimmy Monson he sailed on her as an engineer sadly Jimmy passed away a few years ago he mentioned this ship fondly many times during our conversations a true gentlemen indeed.

CliveH
2nd April 2014, 09:03
She is an interesting vessel, one in as much she was just completed before the advent of WW2 and never entered service until nearly ten years after her completion. Two that she was designed to carry a relatively small number of passengers for her size, although of course her cargo capacity was not inconsiderable.Three that they chose the engines that they did and that they were as powerful as they were. Whatever I just wish they made them like that these days, she has a certain balance to the profile, not beautiful, a sense of power certainly and quite imposing close up...well in my view!!.
And I agree that its a shame that young people today stand no chance of doing what we obviously did..prodigious ship visiting!!...and believe it or not the Persic was one of the vessels that I did see visit in UK. Its a small world after all!!.

As the above was posted here so long ago and there are lots and lots of comments on this thread, not all of which I have had time to read, it is possible that someone else may have picked up on the error.
Mr Rogers says that Dominion Monarch did not actually enter service until ten years after her completion.
This of course is incorrect; Dominion Monarch departed Southampton on 17th February 1939 on her maiden voyage and made one of the fastest passages on record between Durban and Fremantle of just under 9 days. On her third outward bound voyage she sailed from London on the 3rd August 1939 and by the time she had completed her outward voyage the Second World War had begun.

Hugh Ferguson
2nd April 2014, 09:20
Dominion Monarch in K.G.v dry dock