War Loss Replacement

Stuart Smith
18th March 2005, 09:41
I have read numerous times that such and such ship was a War loss Replacement. I do understand that in the time of war the government requisition ships for war work and that inevitably losses occur through no fault of the shipping line owning and operating them. Also at the end of hostilities the company needs to have ships replaced without the huge cost of rebuilding. Exactly how did the scheme work and from what source did the replacement ships come.
Stuart Smith

John Rogers
18th March 2005, 15:10
One of the source of replacements were war prizes from the German fleet, anothers came from the government,I served on a couple that were replacements and they were Park Boats from Canada. Sorry I cannot help on the process.
Oldsalt.

Doug Rogers
18th March 2005, 22:32
Another source was from the excess vessels built under the War Emergency Programmes in both the UK and the USA etc. As trade resumed old and normal patterns there were excess hulls and many of these were allocated to shipping companies to use. Their were financial considerations and various other tradeoffs in the system and although it sounds simple in essence it was not.
I sailed on one Victory ship of two allocated to P&O as reparations for war losses, the Karmala(picture in the Gallery)...the other being the Khyber, interestingly the former crewed by Chinese and the latter by Indians. Another example was in the liner Himalaya, when building after the war she was fitted with turbines that had already been built for a cruiser that got cancelled at the end of the war. No doubt acquired free or at a vastly reduced price??.
Interestingly a lot of those vessels allocated were only stop gaps and were replaced by new buildings but there were still very substatial numbers that exisited 20 years plus afterthe event..both Karmala and Khyber being in that category.
I hope that helps a little.

japottinger
19th March 2005, 15:46
Brocklebank were somewhat unique in that they were allowed to have ships built for their own ownership and specification by Wm.Hamilton during WWII.

Stuart Smith
19th March 2005, 19:11
Thanks for the info gents and some good insider knowledge Doug.

john g
20th March 2005, 15:32
Brocklebank were somewhat unique in that they were allowed to have ships built for their own ownership and specification by Wm.Hamilton during WWII.

Any idea why ? Brocks did have some unique characteristics like the flying of the house flag ...was it from the fore or main mast can't remember was't that to do with the days when they were privateers , I know they used to have a lot of clought in Calcutta.

michael james
20th March 2005, 23:19
For John g, I have no theory on why Brocklebanks were allowed special privilages re ship building but the tradition of flying the house flag from the foremast was from the Companys privateering days, as you so rightly suggest, when the main mast was used to display the letters of marque flag, also it was the Companys house flag before the International Code of Signals flags were brought in, and the letter "A" had to be designed with a swallowtail as Brocklebanks refused to change their house flag. Established in 1770 the Company was the oldest company of shipowners in the world so with its Raj connections did carry some clout. Mike J

Ron B Manderson
21st March 2005, 10:39
The house flag on Foremast, was that not an honour given to them by British crown, for the work they done during the Indian revolution. That stickes in my mind .
Never wrong ,but may be misinformed lol
Ron

A.G.Greenwood
29th January 2006, 21:54
Does anyone know of the current whereabouts of Peter Fuller who was 5th Engineer on the Brocklebank ship SS Marwarri early in 1961. He was a good friend and I have completely lost touch.
Tony Greenwood

pilot
30th January 2006, 05:03
The house flag on Foremast, was that not an honour given to them by British crown, for the work they done during the Indian revolution.
Ron

Letter of Marque granted by H.M. King George III to Daniel Brocklebank in 1779. For the work carried out by the brig Castor in the American War of Independence. (source "The House of Brocklebank 1770-1954")

Regards. Martin