british emerald

connie
5th July 2007, 23:50
hi, i have received an email from"B/P news"<editor@bp.com> which may be of interest to all interested in bp shipping. in it they say they have taken delivery this week of the br. emerald the worlds largest liquified natural gas carrier at a 155.000 cu. mt. it is duel fuel and has a 23 man (or should that be persons, in these political correct times lol) crew, and is the 1st of 4 "gem class carriers" sure beats the good old gas enterprise!! regards con.

gdynia
6th July 2007, 09:58
Connie
Did 9 months on the Enterprise I dont think we had a day when we didnt break down

Jim S
9th July 2007, 21:42
As above Post by Connie - British Emerald built in Korea by Hyundai Heavy Industries.
Diesel Electric propulsion - 4 dual fuel diesel engines. I assume twin screw.

gadgee
10th July 2007, 20:31
A link to more information on British Emerald:-

http://www.shippingtimes.co.uk/item681_britishemerald.htm

Jim S
10th July 2007, 20:40
On reflection I think I am wrong in assuming that British Emerald might be twin screw - I have seen a Wartsila drawing (not necessarily of British Emerald) that shows 4 dual fuel diesel engines driving alternators that in turn can power two electric propulsion motors that are connected through gearing to a single fixed pitch propeller.

roy quirk
15th July 2007, 23:02
flying the Manx flag and registered in Douglas!

oilybob
10th August 2007, 10:47
Hi there, Im new to these boards but are currently sailing with bp as 2eng most recently on the 'new' British Osprey and previously the first of the 'new' Tree class British Laurel. However have most recently been posted to the build yard of the last of these LNG vessels due out next year.
I can confirm that she is fitted with 1 Fixed pitch propeller driven through a gearbox by two 14mw motors. She is fitted with 4 duel fuel diesels 2x v12 and 2x L9 producing a total availble power of 39.5Mw, all at 6600v.
These engines are rigged to burn MDO or LNG, the idea is that they will use LNG most of the time, any excess boil off is burnt in a large GCU(gas combustion unit) located up in the casing, the exhaust of which can be clearly seen on photographs(its the very big one). The are fitted with a boiler as well for service steam but it is only a tiddly one.
The engine room layout is like nothing I have seen before it is all very compartmentlised with 2 seperate engine rooms and all services built in quite narrow corridoors either side of them only the bottom plates and second deck are real full width areas.

oilybob

Jim S
11th August 2007, 19:14
Very interesting to read your piece on the new "Gem Class" of LNG carriers.
Are the engines Wartsila?.
You also mentioned the GCU - I take it there is no re-liquification of the boil off gas?
I look forward to reading further reports of the ship.

Thanks
Jim S

Satanic Mechanic
14th March 2009, 04:25
Very interesting to read your piece on the new "Gem Class" of LNG carriers.
Are the engines Wartsila?.
You also mentioned the GCU - I take it there is no re-liquification of the boil off gas?
I look forward to reading further reports of the ship.

Thanks
Jim S

There are a number of different paths LNG vessels are taking since steam is no longer regarded as an option.

The dual fuel diesel electric (DFDE) option uses Wartsilla D50 engines which either MDO or Gas as fuel. When running in gas mode the engine actually runs on Otto cycle with the gas being induced with the scavenge air and ignition be initiated using a small diesel injector. The Gem class series can only use diesel fuel - which it is fair to say nice for the engine and engineers - accountants are crapping it though if the engines ever go onto diesel burning

The logical step from there is of course Tri fuel diesel electric which can use HFO as well. These are entering service - I wouldn't be surprised if they try and retro fit the Gem class - big job though

The reliquifaction path has a number of different variations but essentially they all come down to the same thing - using Nitrogen as a refridgerent to reliquify the boil of gas - worth remembering that similar to LPG the reliq plant is primarily a way to control tank pressure. The two problems with reliq plant are the amount of power it uses (maxy whizz = 5MW) and its somewhat fractious nature - it can be tempremental and the actual process espescially capacity control is very very slow. These generally have two conventional slow speed diesels for propulsion

Both systems use a Gas Combustion unit as a back up. From an engineering point of view these units are extremely annoying as basically you flare the gas and get no work from it - as far as I'm concerned they will be first against the wall when the revolution comes.

There are another couple of systems out there -

a) gas turbine not in use - lovely looking system - Rolls Royce capexed it out of contention though
b) Slow speed gas engine - requires the gas pressure to be around 200 bar - this makes people nervous - I think we may see some of these soon though

Steve Hodges
14th March 2009, 09:56
Looks like the last stronghold of the steam turbine has gone, then.
Bugger it, I'll NEVER get back to sea again now.........

Satanic Mechanic
14th March 2009, 12:00
on the bright side the existing ones probably won't be re engined and they have years to go yet - agreed though very sorry to them go

Jim S
14th March 2009, 21:25
There are a number of different paths LNG vessels are taking since steam is no longer regarded as an option.

The dual fuel diesel electric (DFDE) option uses Wartsilla D50 engines which either MDO or Gas as fuel. When running in gas mode the engine actually runs on Otto cycle with the gas being induced with the scavenge air and ignition be initiated using a small diesel injector. The Gem class series can only use diesel fuel - which it is fair to say nice for the engine and engineers - accountants are crapping it though if the engines ever go onto diesel burning

The logical step from there is of course Tri fuel diesel electric which can use HFO as well. These are entering service - I wouldn't be surprised if they try and retro fit the Gem class - big job though

The reliquifaction path has a number of different variations but essentially they all come down to the same thing - using Nitrogen as a refridgerent to reliquify the boil of gas - worth remembering that similar to LPG the reliq plant is primarily a way to control tank pressure. The two problems with reliq plant are the amount of power it uses (maxy whizz = 5MW) and its somewhat fractious nature - it can be tempremental and the actual process espescially capacity control is very very slow. These generally have two conventional slow speed diesels for propulsion

Both systems use a Gas Combustion unit as a back up. From an engineering point of view these units are extremely annoying as basically you flare the gas and get no work from it - as far as I'm concerned they will be first against the wall when the revolution comes.

There are another couple of systems out there -

a) gas turbine not in use - lovely looking system - Rolls Royce capexed it out of contention though
b) Slow speed gas engine - requires the gas pressure to be around 200 bar - this makes people nervous - I think we may see some of these soon though

Thank you very much for the above description.
greatly appreciated,

Jim S

oilybob
10th June 2009, 23:56
Well I am glad that someone else(who is setanic Mechanic?) managed to reply with more info, just shows how long it was since i looked back here!!

I would agree about the Gas combustion Unit, this thing is a real pain, very noisy when running at full rate and the last trip was not exactly reliable in operation. When going it would be fine, but getting it to light...well thats a different matter.


bob

James_C
11th June 2009, 00:03
Does that mean it has the same starting "issues" as the mighty Doxford?
Dah, dah, chuff, BANG...

Satanic Mechanic
11th June 2009, 19:27
Well I am glad that someone else(who is Satanic Mechanic?) managed to reply with more info, just shows how long it was since i looked back here!!

I would agree about the Gas combustion Unit, this thing is a real pain, very noisy when running at full rate and the last trip was not exactly reliable in operation. When going it would be fine, but getting it to light...well thats a different matter.


bob


Who is he indeed Bob - and what does he want. I'm not going to tell you - just for the fun of it. (Jester)

Trust your trip on the Diamond went well

George Simpson
11th June 2009, 19:30
They seek him here They seek him there!

Who is the Satanic Mechanic?

Is the question of the day.