Wages at sea

Ferrous Phil
14th July 2007, 19:15
In the 80's I could never say I was underpaid whilst UK coasting thanks to a pay scale that gave a (low) weekly basic and then had extra top up payments for every possible eventuality, this included being at anchor, or locking in, or loading, or discharging, or more than two ports in one day.
I expected to take a pay cut when I left foreign going ships but providing we were busy my monthly pay was double deep sea salary.
I remember finally taking a shore side job in 1984 for 3.20/ hour and how hard it was to adjust.
I wonder if coasting wages are still ahead of that found ashore? or was I just fortunate to be on a busy ship ?

Pat McCardle
14th July 2007, 19:37
You might have been in there prior to the decline in standard wages to consolidated wages ie no overtime, loss of sleep 2 for 1 & 3 for 1. I was better paid as a Bo'sun 24 years ago than I am now as Mate (In real terms)In fact, I was better paid than the Mate then but we had to do some hours. I was with Stevie Clarke's then.

wa002f0328
14th July 2007, 19:45
(
you should have been there in 1953, we worked then for our pennys,(Thumb)

Pat McCardle
14th July 2007, 19:48
DITTO early 80's!!

John Rogers
14th July 2007, 19:50
When I went to sea on a small coaster in 1947 my pay was eight pounds a month,(Deck Boy) I received 30 extra shillings for trimming the cargo of grain each time we loaded, and we earned it shoveling the grain inside the hatches, no mask or eye protection back in those days. After a couple years I went below and shoveled coal for 30 pounds a month. How times have changed.
John.

Eggo
16th July 2007, 05:56
When I went to sea on a small coaster in 1947 my pay was eight pounds a month,(Deck Boy) I received 30 extra shillings for trimming the cargo of grain each time we loaded, and we earned it shoveling the grain inside the hatches, no mask or eye protection back in those days. After a couple years I went below and shoveled coal for 30 pounds a month. How times have changed.
John.John ,I to worked on a coal burning coaster 'Cliff Quay' and we had to pay the steward each week for the food. They had a generator for lights etc but used to switch it off at 1900 in port and we had to make do with oil lamps. Les