New Malware about - beware!

ddraigmor
13th August 2007, 22:55
Hi all,

Just spent a good 24 hours reinstalling my system.

There is a new very nasty malware about that stops you having admin rights in Windows - you cannot operate things like Control Panel, Reg Edit (etc) - even in safe mode and even when you have logged in as admin.

It takes the form of a fairly innocent looking balloon that pops up near to where automatic updates does in the task bar and says something like 'Your anti-virus needs updating'. Like an eejit, I clicked it - and bingo, was transpotrted to a site that has the title Go. Win Anti Virus. I immediately came off - but too late. Next log in and I was infected. Balloon comes up every five or so minutes and if you don't attend to it, it hijacks your browser and takes you to their web page.

I went to Tech Guy's Forum and apparently this is a 'drive by' malware programme that simply installs and wreaks havoc. Nothing can get shot of it - I tried everything I know including running the otherwise excellent SmiFraud Fix in Safe Mode - to no avail. All that is left to do is re-install - a tedious job.

So be aware before you hit that balloon believeing ,as I did, that it was my system telling me I needed updates.

By the way I run Comodo Firewall and anti-virus which have been excellent and also did a free scan with the normally excellent PC-Cillin - which detected it as a script programme but was unable to clear it......

Jonty

sparkie2182
13th August 2007, 23:28
thanks for that.......................

John Rogers
13th August 2007, 23:43
Many thanks for the warning.
John.

treeve
14th August 2007, 02:21
I have all my updates on manual control.
I have heard of these balloon warnings,
and so I have turned off all auto updates.
I can then check direct with the website
of the program. Mind you I was caught out
by a bogus website recently, so nothing
is perfect.

billyboy
14th August 2007, 03:29
I run AVG anti-virus. Ad-aware spyware detector and crap cleaner (good one that)
Been having a prob or two just lately. made sure all three were updated this morning and ran them. Result...No viruses, severl threats of spyware (removed) and loads of crap. all cleaned up and computer running a lot quicker than before. Thanks for the warning. Much appreciated.
Billyboy

R58484956
14th August 2007, 11:06
Thank you for the warning, much appreciated.

MikeK
14th August 2007, 15:05
I run AVG anti-virus. Ad-aware spyware detector and crap cleaner (good one that)
Been having a prob or two just lately. made sure all three were updated this morning and ran them. Result...No viruses, severl threats of spyware (removed) and loads of crap. all cleaned up and computer running a lot quicker than before. Thanks for the warning. Much appreciated.
Billyboy

Thanks for the tip Billyboy, I downloaded and ran the crap cleaner and got shot of nearly 70meg's worth of rubbish lying about
MikeK(Thumb)

John Rogers
14th August 2007, 15:23
Here is a site where you can get help,read it so you will be prepared. Also if you buy a second hard-drive and clone it you will never have to go through the bother of re-installing like Jonty had to.. Below is the site you should read.

http://securityticker.blogspot.com/2006/05/easy-fix-for-spyware-and-virus-alert.html

John.

Shipbuilder
6th September 2007, 20:20
If one gets an external hard drive of sufficent memory, how do you actually clone the contents of the computer so that in the event of hard disk failure, you can put the whole lot back in the new hard drive in "one lump" without going through the agonising procedure of re-installing & putting everything back bit-by-bit from numerous back-up disks?
Bob

benjidog
6th September 2007, 23:45
To answer your specific question, a product such as Powerquest Drive Copy will do this but there are other considerations:

1. If you restore from a Drive Copy backup, what you will get will be exactly what you saved. So if you have made changes since the backup was made you will lose the changes. So this suggests you should refresh your backup copy regularly.

2. You are advised in any case to make regular backups of your data onto CD or DVD - documents, photos, spreadsheets etc. on a regular basis. Then even if you do have to rebuld your computer (or indeed if it gets stolen) you have not lost the precious stuff.

3. You can partition your hard drive to produce two or more logical disks on the same machine. However if the disk drive itself gets buggered (a technical term!) you will lose all logical drives on the physical disk. It is better to have a second hard drive and use that for backups.

Regards,

Brian

Shipbuilder
7th September 2007, 08:42
These days, I do all my work using compact flash cards that work well as small external hard disks I suppose. Then I back it up onto the computer hard disk. I am not all that bothered about the information as apart from the above, I put it all on CD disks regularly. What I am more concerned about is the programmes that are installed such as Windows, Anti Virus, Photoshop, PDF Factory Pro etc. If I lost it all, I could put these back from the original disks that I keep safe, but it would be very tedious. Is it possible to clone the whole lot, installed programmes as well? So that even if I got a new computer, I could put the whole lot, programmes & info into it in one big lump?
Bob

andysk
8th September 2007, 00:54
Hi Bob ...

I invested in a Maxtor 300 Gb 'OneTouch' stand alone hard drive a few months ago, it comes with a backup programme that you can set either to the same time each day, or have as manual. It also allows you to select which folders and drives you want to back up.

Once the initial backup is made, which can take some time dependant on the number of folders/files, it does each subsequent one as incremental, (ie) only those files that have been changed since the last one.

When I got it the cost was about 120 from SuperSava (sp?) of Watford, and came the next day. It was a doddle to set up and get running; I tend to manually back up on a weekly basis.

Hope this is useful for you ...

Cheers

Andy

benjidog
8th September 2007, 01:02
These days, I do all my work using compact flash cards that work well as small external hard disks I suppose. Then I back it up onto the computer hard disk. I am not all that bothered about the information as apart from the above, I put it all on CD disks regularly. What I am more concerned about is the programmes that are installed such as Windows, Anti Virus, Photoshop, PDF Factory Pro etc. If I lost it all, I could put these back from the original disks that I keep safe, but it would be very tedious. Is it possible to clone the whole lot, installed programmes as well? So that even if I got a new computer, I could put the whole lot, programmes & info into it in one big lump?
Bob

Bob,

See post #10 on this thread - that is exactly what products like I described do.

Brian

Shipbuilder
8th September 2007, 13:29
Thanks for info. I have been looking at a Maxtor this morning in Maplin's, so may get one after I have studied info a bit mor.
Bob

Shipinfo
26th September 2007, 08:19
Just a little warning here, if you do clone the hard drive from the old machine then bung it in the new machine it probably won't work as the new machine will most likely have a different processor, chipset etc. Cloning is great for saving time but only on the one machine.

Shipbuilder
4th October 2007, 08:42
Thanks for info. I got a Maxtor, but have only backed up the files from the computer on it. If & when I get another computer, I guess I will just have to install the programs separately, but at least I will still have all my files intact. How reliable are these external hard drives? Is their lifespan estimated in years or decades? Also, I was wondering about the lifespan of Compact Flash cards. I have been using them for a couple of years as small external hard disks & they work fine via the card reader. I have heard from some sources that they have a limited lifespan, but others say there is no reason why they should not last for years.
Bob

Shipinfo
4th October 2007, 09:09
External hard drives should last a few years if looked after, I doubt anything would last decades as far as computers go, even if a component still worked it might not be compatible with new hardware. CF cards are supposed to last years but for the above reasons I wouldn't rely totally on them.

Shipbuilder
4th October 2007, 09:59
Thanks, that is what I thought. I suppose shoving it all on CDs from time to time is the safest, but if they go & alter the systems it messes things up. I spent years learning about valves & as soon as I understood them, they changed to transistors. Then after laboriously learning DOS, they changed to Windows.
Bob

tedc
21st November 2007, 14:49
Shipbuilder,

You might want to have a look at VCOM's web page for a product called "Autosave 2".

http://www.avanquest.co.uk

This runs in the background and keeps a dynamic backup on a USB external HDD or an HDD or even on CDs.

Not much thinking requires.

This is part of their speil:_

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VCOM’s AutoSave 2 is a feature-packed backup software and backup utilities providing a unique, “real-time”, automatic security solution that you simply set up once and forget! Its easy-to-use Setup wizard allows flexible management of backups; while the Restore wizard walks users through disaster recovery quickly and easily. It backs up to a wide variety of storage devices, including networks, without schedules or user interruption. AutoSave is perfect for all PC users, from novice to expert, desktop or laptop.


-------------%<--------------

Please note that I am not a salesman, or anything else, for this company but I like this product.