King Edward VII Nautical College Old Boys Association

The Captain
16th August 2007, 02:07
Does anybody know if there is any kind of old boys association for King Teds pre-sea college. I have searched the net and found nothing. I was a boarder at the residence in Gloucester Road in 1964. The pre-sea school was the top floor of a primary school in Whitechapel. Any info or contact would be appreciated.

John

Keltic Star
16th August 2007, 03:53
Does anybody know if there is any kind of old boys association for King Teds pre-sea college. I have searched the net and found nothing. I was a boarder at the residence in Gloucester Road in 1964. The pre-sea school was the top floor of a primary school in Whitechapel. Any info or contact would be appreciated.

John

Don't know of any organization. The closest seems to be the communication between we old boys here on SN.
Bob
King Ted's 58/59

Chris Isaac
16th August 2007, 07:29
Dont think so!
Chris
king teds 62/63 then mar in 65

non descript
16th August 2007, 07:42
John, as far as I know the King Edward VII Old Boys Association is indeed a thread in "Ships Nostaligia" (Jester)

There are various threads with comments about this fine sea-faring establishment located at opposing social ends of the District Line, and I will try to bring them under one common thread at some stage. For the moment I may, with your permission, take the liberty of re-naming your thread as a starter.

Mark

John Crossland
16th August 2007, 09:02
John Crossland 1966-1967

The Captain
16th August 2007, 11:58
Tonga you may take whatever liberties you wish with the thread with my blessing. The pre-sea course was for 12 months only but was the jumping off point, a nexus if you will, between school and adult life for many Merchant Navy Apprentices and Cadets. Most of the pre-sea establishments have an "Old Boys Web Sight" of some description but poor old King Teds seems to have no one to remember it. Blimey, get the kleenex out, can't you hear the violins.

John

Nova Scotian
16th August 2007, 12:04
Does anybody know if there is any kind of old boys association for King Teds pre-sea college. I have searched the net and found nothing. I was a boarder at the residence in Gloucester Road in 1964. The pre-sea school was the top floor of a primary school in Whitechapel. Any info or contact would be appreciated.

John

Hi John:

There is quite a lot of information on King Teds on this site. I left King Teds in
March of 1964. If I remember correctly the Cadet Captain at the time was a David DeBarr (SPL ?). Like you I travelled the tube from Gloucester Road to Aldgate and attended classes above the school in Redmans Road. I remember occaisional classes at 680 Commercial Road and evening classes somewhere in Fulham. A great experience if you can forget about the tripe and onions every Friday.

In 1964 one of the instructors coordinated a news letter that briefly identified the movement and experiences of the graduates that year. The idea was a good one but difficult to manage and it died after a few postings.

I posted a thumbnail of my class last year...you may recognise some of the faces.

Cheers

Bearwood
16th August 2007, 19:39
Just for the record, King Edward's was the next step in the education of many ex pupils of the Royal Merchant Navy School who followed their fathers into the Merchant Navy. As Alumni Secretary for the Old Royals Association I am in touch with quite a few of them from the 1940s and 1950s.

John_F
17th August 2007, 17:27
I did 4 months pre-sea training at King Ted's, September - December 1958, prior to joining BP. This course was held at an annexe (part of a primary school, I think) in Smithy Street, just off the Mile End Rd. Once a week we would go to 680 Commercial Rd & thence to the West India Docks where we would spend the morning rowing whalers.
Principal of the establishment at that time was Captain Ballard. Captain Miller, I think, was Vice Principal & also taught us Seamanship. He gave us one very memorable trip on a powerful motor launch owned by the College called the Magellan. Captain Griffiths was Master of the Wendorian - a lovely man.
I passed by Smithy Street one day last year & took a photo:
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=4430&d=1143056801
Kind regards,
John F.

Try that John
Kris

waiwera
18th August 2007, 17:46
Thank John_F for the current picture of Smithy Street( Or was it Redmans Road?) Quite spooky seeing it looking just the same in 2007.

I was @ King Teds from Sept 63 to July 64.
Remember the daily tube run from Gloucester Road. I think the Halls of Residence on the corner of Cromwell and Gloucester Road became a Nat West Bank.

Remember Weekends up the West End at the Marquee and 100 club- Two Eyes Coffee Bar and Groups like the Yardbirds & The Animals - We used to climb back in "after hours" through the boot room basement window - Left open by the duty cadet! Great espirit de cour...........

A great year learnt a lot with Engineering/Science @ Poplar Tech, Rowing Whalers @ Millwall Docks, Motor Boating on board the "Cabot"@ HQS Wellington- Embankment and of course sea/river training on board "Glen Strathallen ( Lots of pictures of her on this site & The her engine in the Science Museum now). Remember anchor watches in the Thames Estuary peeling spuds and drinking cocoa in the small hours.

Cannot remember any of the Masters except the Principal Captain Smith ( Wore a Bowler Hat) and Captain Whelan?

Great start to a career at sea with the benefot of 6 months seatime remission............. Good to hear from some of the other students.

Dave437
19th August 2007, 22:40
R594580. See previous thread! Did 2nd Mates at King Teds 1957-8. Great fun, passed everything except signals......bloody semaphore!!! Hated it.
Dave.

The Captain
20th August 2007, 05:11
John (Nova Scotian), this would appear to be a popular name. I had a look at your "thumb nail" and lo and behold a face from the past but not at King Teds but Bank Line 1966 one Mr. Cobham, I never even realised he'd been to King Teds so thank you for that. The other faces I'm afraid I don't recognise, they all look so young of course when I started the seniors all looked older and more mature. I was put way up on the top floor away from almost everybody in a room for 3 and my room mates that first term were 2 Iranian cadets who were sent to the pre sea course by their company and government, the company name has slipped my mind. I do know they were quite a bit older than the rest of us and not adverse to the odd tipple. Their destiny was to get their 2nd Mates and then go as pilots back at home, I don't think they liked that idea but by being at sea they avoided conscription into the army so that seemed a pretty good reason to go to sea from my point of view. DeBarr, yes, head boy as far as I can remember. The head boy for the Sept to Dec 1964 term was yours truely. The head of department was a man called Smith no other names come to mind. The chap who took English decided that we knew it all (or knew nothing and it wasn't worth trying to teach us) and decided that we would be better of learning how to take care of our selves, sewing buttons on, dressing properly, eating properly etc. We attendend a course at the London School of Tailoring (6 weeks) and a course at a college where budding waiters trained both these courses were excellant and stood me in good stead for an apprenticeship with the Bank Line. The only other boys I remember was Bond (I don't think it was James) but he used to play on it and a chap called Smith, Ian I think who came from up North but lived in Brighton, we went to his place the weekend of the Mods and Rockers do, he joined BP in January/February 1965.

John

Nova Scotian
20th August 2007, 12:01
Hi Captain:

I believe Mr Cobham is a member of SN and has contributed to a number of threads concerning Bank Line.

Cheers

Nova Scotian
20th August 2007, 12:15
All of us that completed the pre-sea course at King Teds joined their first ship armed with a correspondence course from the college. I would imagine that very few apprentices and cadets completed the full four-year course. There were so many distractions! I think I abandoned mine somewhere into the third year of my time.

Thinking back, it was a good program with well thought out learning activities and information material. Taken seriously it probably took some of the sting out of the studies required for Second mates.

I have attached a thumbnail of a marking report I found among some old papers I was sorting.

Cheers.

Treboat
25th August 2007, 10:20
Around 1967/8 I attended King Edward VII Nautical College, Commercial Road London to commence the struggle for Second Mate Foreign Going Certificate. I have to say that it was a reasonably wild time, with a number of lunch time sessions and making a lot of friends, though of course we all disappeared across the globe subsequently.

Somehow we managed to cram into about 3 months what we were supposed to have been studying over the last 4 years or so.

The classes were always full, must have been about 30 or more in each class and never any shortage of personnel. Some of you must have been there.

I would love to hear any memories you have. Can you remember the Coopers Arms across the road, with its collection of nautical bits and pieces from around the world; or of course the river pubs like the Prospect of Whitby? But what about the instructors? I struggle to remember them, but we owe them a lot I think I recall the chap that did signals, probably because we had to spend long periods staring at him. I won't go on long now, but look forward to hearing anyone's recollections. Treboat.

Nova Scotian
25th August 2007, 11:13
I attended King Teds for Second Mates in 1968 too. The number of candidates writing, I think it was about 70, was so large that a second examination venue was identified in addition to the Dock Street office. I stayed at the residence in the college at 680 and attended classes across the road.

The signals instructor would hold a special pre-examination session on morse and semaphore on the evening before the examination. We showed our appreciation by dropping a half-crown into a hat, he would leave by the door, as we left.

Managed to get a ticket to see Man U beat Benfica in the European Cup Final at Wembly just before I went up for my orals.

Good times.

Treboat
25th August 2007, 15:03
Ah! The Orals! Captain Piggot comes to mind and the smell of fear on the stairs at Dock Street.

When you said "680" a lot more came back, because I did the King Ted's correspondence course, or rather I was supposed to. Along with other Hain's apprentices in those days we were not known for our studying. The address of 680 Commercial Road must have been locked away in the depths of my memory.

Wife is calling me out in the sunshine now, so must go. They tell me that summer does sometimes have sun.

Good to hear from you Nova Scotia.

Treboat

Keltic Star
25th August 2007, 16:08
Picture of 680 Commercial Road attached circa 50's. Not sure who sent this to me but credit to the donor.

Went by there last year, now an apartment building.

Treboat
25th August 2007, 18:24
Thanks for that Keltic Star. I recall sitting behind those ground floor windows with the lorries from the docks thundering past, so loud it was hard to hear what the lecturer was saying. Or that was my excuse anyway.

The Captain
25th August 2007, 22:22
Whilst I did not attend King Teds to do "tickets", I did go to the pre-sea in '64. The residence on Commercial Road was known as the "Stack of Bricks". We used to visit the college as pre-sea students for seamanship instruction and look on with envy at the blokes doing their "tickets".

John

msalter
20th September 2007, 11:24
Hi All
I have recently joined SN and find it fascinating. Isn't Nostalgia great

As regards Old Boys pls see Friends Reunited and join up as King Teds OB's are listed back to the 40's I believe. I have found one member on my course Philip Reilly whom I knew quite well at that time going on to join BP tankers.

For myself, having read all the threads I can only add my 'penneth.' I was KE on the short course Sept 59 - Dec 59 and was totally enthralled as I was 16 years old. We were installed in our cabins four to mine with 2 BP boys and 1 Elder Dempster cadet to be. I myself had no company in mind but was not 'Tanker' orientated.

We travelled from Gloucester Road to Stepney Green each day bar Tuesdays am when we went 'boating' with Captain Scott in the WI and Millwall docks. As you all were aware we learnt about ships and shipping companes as well as whaler rowing, from Capt S. he was Blue Funnel man if I recall. We visited the vessels tied up from time to time.

During the term those at Cromwell Road were given shore leave on alternate weekends and I remember that the two capt cadets Cox (Eagle Star) and Backhouse (Elder Dempster) were, around late November time, relieved of their command. Dont know why.

I know that this is is along thread, but in pasing the highlight was the SY Wendorian (sailing from Wapping Basin) experience with Capt Griffiths and the trip down the Thames wernt we pushed? Also I enjoyed the trips on the cabot from the Wellington, I think with Capt Miller and the repeated efforts of being in charge of bringing her alongside the various pontoons on the river Thames At the end of term I joined him and two other cadets in taking the 'Cabot' up river to Thorneycrofts boatyard beyond Hampton Court with Capt M. in a very realaxed fashion it rained for most of the trip.

During the end of term exams I had some injections and was ill in the sick bay for a time and was assessed for some final Signalling was one taken with Capt Hussey. I was hopeless at Morse Code and his light flashing okm with semaphore. What about he speed and accuracy tests mid and final term additon, subtraction etc, with large sums urgh!

I left K. Teds in December with the other cadets to join Frank C Strict & Co Ltd on the 28th December of that year. I only met one former classmate whilst at sea. He was with Ellerman Lines 'City of Ely' when discharging cargo at Meana-Al-Ahmadi.

Hope this post is of interest
Malcolm Salter

John_F
22nd September 2007, 18:40
Hi All


I know that this is is along thread, but in pasing the highlight was the SY Wendorian (sailing from Wapping Basin) experience with Capt Griffiths and the trip down the Thames wernt we pushed? Also I enjoyed the trips on the cabot from the Wellington, I think with Capt Miller and the repeated efforts of being in charge of bringing her alongside the various pontoons on the river Thames At the end of term I joined him and two other cadets in taking the 'Cabot' up river to Thorneycrofts boatyard beyond Hampton Court with Capt M. in a very realaxed fashion it rained for most of the trip.

Malcolm,
I did the same course as you a year earlier but commuted from home each day. I also found that the highlight of the term was a trip on the Wendorian from Wapping to Southend, where we would anchor off the pier & do endless stints of lifeboat drill.
I always thought that the motor launch used by Captain Miller was called the Magellan but happy to be proved wrong. I had one memorable trip on her with Captain Miller when he decided to tow a barge through the locks at Shadwell. Unfortunately, the lighterman on the barge didn't get a line ashore quick enough & the launch ended up being the meat in the sandwich between the lock gates & the barge. Much creaking of wooden timbers but she didn't appear to spring any leaks. I believe Captain Miller may be still alive & living in Southampton.
I went back to King Ted's for my Second Mate's Ticket & was fortunate to pass first time. Signals & Orals were held at Dock Street at 08.00 if I remember rightly but the written exams were held at St. Christopher House, London Bridge. Radar ticket was taken on the Sir John Cass launch on the Thames.
Thanks for the memories Malcolm.
Kind regards,
John.

Davyth
24th October 2011, 16:20
I was at KE in '52 on the short course prior to a stint at OBSS in Aberdovey and then apprenticeship with Shell. I remember we stayed in large house somewhere in the Kensington area and travelled daily to a school somewhere in East London. I remember the Wendorian, and rowing whalers in what was then toxic Thames. We were warned that falling in meant a hospital visit! What was the vessel reputed to have been a King of Italy's boat? It was gorgeous, if run-down, and on board we always got woken with, "Wakey, wakey, rise and shine. The sun's burning yer eyes out! Anyone from that time with clearer memories?

Joe C
25th October 2011, 17:18
I've posted a couple of photos on the other KE thread that may interest you.
I was there for a year,1953/4

Tom Wood
8th November 2011, 03:59
I was at KE in '52 on the short course prior to a stint at OBSS in Aberdovey and then apprenticeship with Shell. I remember we stayed in large house somewhere in the Kensington area and travelled daily to a school somewhere in East London. I remember the Wendorian, and rowing whalers in what was then toxic Thames. We were warned that falling in meant a hospital visit! What was the vessel reputed to have been a King of Italy's boat? It was gorgeous, if run-down, and on board we always got woken with, "Wakey, wakey, rise and shine. The sun's burning yer eyes out! Anyone from that time with clearer memories?

Howdy - Davyth - I've tried hard to reach someone around my time at the Nautical College - My year was 1950/51 and I'm still around and kicking.
The SY Wendorian we were told was the original King of Spain - King Alfonso who was deposed by Generismo Franco civil war 31-39.
Franco gave/lent ? the Yacht to KE. on condition the college trained his family members (how true ?)
The Whalers were the Lecky and Sommner and the motor launch Magellan - Pronciple capt.Chase - head Capt. Ballard - Miller Fifield and the maintenance man at 680 Commercial Rd was Gulliver.
Hope to hear from you on here or email respondtom@aol.com
Regards Tom.

JAB1020
9th November 2011, 11:29
During my time with caltex,completed the corresponce course from King Teds
I was rewarded with a 3 month Mid-apprenticeship course in the summer of 66.
Wow..after 2+ years of boredom between the gulf and europort,the east end was heaven, remember the stewards were all working at the school due to the strike.
Had some sort of connection with a teachers training college in south london,
woke up after a dance at the school with a lovely girl (later to find out her name was emma).Turned on radio to hear Frank sinatra singing Strangers in the night!
Best 3 months of my apprenticeship!

capt jim martin
27th December 2011, 10:17
Great to see the spate of posts recently regarding the experiences of some of us who passed the humble portals of King Teds. Was there on 12 month course August 1957 to August 1958, before joining Port Line and have previously posted items re King Teds. We may have lacked the glamour (and bullshit) of the larger sea training establishments but, in my book, we got a very good grounding in the basics, both practical and otherwise.

I have mentioned this before, but on Friends Reunited, someone has posted a photo of a group of pre-sea cadets at King Teds. It appears to have been taken sometime during my above-mentioned period at the school and I recognise myself and a few others, including Laurie Hadden, Monty Stephens, Mick Porter, Jeffries and Harry Dalton. Perhaps one of you there at the same time might like to visit the site and add a few names?

Who remembers the old ogre Captain Woods who presided at the Hall of Residence? Fond memories of Captain Miller and the Master of the "Wendorian", Capt Griffiths - and the Cook who lokked like Arthur English, the comic. Mr Owens was the working boss at Hall of Residence at Cromwell Road and his wife was matron - their joint mission in life was to protect the virtue of their teenage daighter (Gwynneth ?) from the perceived evil intentions of the cadets. Mr.Bell (ex wartime Lt.RM) taught English at the main red brick building near West India Docks - but I think this was for Second Mates rather than pre-sea, memory fades. I remember Captain Hussey (RNR I think,) - I think he had a wartime DSO? Captain Chase was the Principal and Captain Ballard the working Head.

Hope this prompts a few more replies.

Jim Martin
Cadet Captain 1958

borderreiver
27th December 2011, 13:22
Captain Chase last day at King Teds , I posted a photo some time ago
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/175569/title/2-mates-cleasses-at-ki/cat/500

Split
27th December 2011, 13:28
It's strange, but that school seemed to be very little known. I went to Rotherhithe, later known as London Nautical. I went to King Edward VII for 2nd mate but, even then, little was said about the boys' school while I was there.

I entered into an exchange of posts with someone on another MN thread who was trying to make contact with old boys, but that was some years ago, now, and I cannot remember the details and I can't remember the site, either.

matthew flinders
29th December 2011, 12:13
[QUOTE=capt jim martin;561699]Who remembers the old ogre Captain Woods who presided at the Hall of Residence? Fond memories of Captain Miller and the Master of the "Wendorian", Capt Griffiths - and the Cook who lokked like Arthur English, the comic. Mr Owens was the working boss at Hall of Residence at Cromwell Road and his wife was matron - their joint mission in life was to protect the virtue of their teenage daighter (Gwynneth ?) from the perceived evil intentions of the cadets. Mr.Bell (ex wartime Lt.RM) taught English at the main red brick building near West India Docks - but I think this was for Second Mates rather than pre-sea, memory fades. I remember Captain Hussey (RNR I think,) - I think he had a wartime DSO? Captain Chase was the Principal and Captain Ballard the working Head.

This certainly brings back memories. Captain Hussey I remember, taking noon sights using the ridge of an adjacent building as the horizon; Mr. Bell trying to instil some disciplined marching into us in preparation for the St. Pauls Cathedral service; Captain Woods - enough said. The cook on the Wendorian I do not recall looking particularly like Arthus English but I do recall his most enormous hands. Who was the chap (Diamond springs to mind) who took us for gym and swimming being particularly keen on break falls from the top of the wall bars? All so long ago now.

Joe C
29th December 2011, 14:21
[QUOTE=capt jim martin;561699]Who remembers the old ogre Captain Woods who presided at the Hall of Residence? Fond memories of Captain Miller and the Master of the "Wendorian", Capt Griffiths - and the Cook who lokked like Arthur English, the comic. Mr Owens was the working boss at Hall of Residence at Cromwell Road and his wife was matron - their joint mission in life was to protect the virtue of their teenage daighter (Gwynneth ?) from the perceived evil intentions of the cadets. Mr.Bell (ex wartime Lt.RM) taught English at the main red brick building near West India Docks - but I think this was for Second Mates rather than pre-sea, memory fades. I remember Captain Hussey (RNR I think,) - I think he had a wartime DSO? Captain Chase was the Principal and Captain Ballard the working Head.


This certainly brings back memories. Captain Hussey I remember, taking noon sights using the ridge of an adjacent building as the horizon; Mr. Bell trying to instil some disciplined marching into us in preparation for the St. Pauls Cathedral service; Captain Woods - enough said. The cook on the Wendorian I do not recall looking particularly like Arthus English but I do recall his most enormous hands. Who was the chap (Diamond springs to mind) who took us for gym and swimming being particularly keen on break falls from the top of the wall bars? All so long ago now.

I remember the cook on the Wendorian he was ex-GSNC and his extra large hands used to wander a bit, working on a training ship, he must have thought he had died and gone to heaven!!

capt jim martin
30th December 2011, 14:15
Read recent posts re King Teds, posted by "Joe C" and "Mathew Flinders", which rang a few bells. My memories of the Cook aboard the TS "Wendorian" confined to his producing excellent food for hungry cadets and that in a tiny galley. I remember the "Wendy's" Mate as an ex Shell man, surname Smith I think.

I remember that we often shipped out in the "Wendy" from Wapping Basin with a couple of Engineer Officer trainees from Poplar Tech. These unfortunates were persuaded that they were to have a few days practical engineering training - whereas I seem to remember them being used as trimmers and stokers and seeing the whites of their eyes in the bunkers when we tipped in the bags of coal at Wapping!

The reference to a chap who took us for gym and swimming - "Diamond" - prompts the following reminiscences. I recall two separated individuals - but not the name "Diamond", although that might have been a nickname? When I was there 57/58, we had an ex Army wartime commando, a small hard little bugger who taught us boxing and self-defence skills in the buiding in the East End. When, later on I explained these latter skills to my brother, a RM Captain, he thought that they were pretty good, although basic. They included simple techniques for keeping someone with a knife at arms length, eye-gouging, strangulation, effective rabbit punching, creating weapons from things to hand etc - never ever had to use any of these, but like all of us I probably often ended up in low dives where it might have been necessary! The other chap I recall took those of us at the Hall of Residence once a week, in the evening, for gym at a location a good half an hour's run from Gloucester Road. He was, I think, an ex Army or Navy PTI and, although not very tall, he was very wide! Immensely strong in the chest and arms he was capable of holding himself completely horizontal on the gym climbing ropes.

Over to you........

Jim Martin

waiwera
30th December 2011, 15:35
The King Ted's Instructor that taught Cpt Jim Martin in 58 was still there in 63/64 - still teaching judo and self defence. Remember when he made a big mistake pairing us off each side of the mat, and in error, put two Nigerian Cadets ( from different tribes) against each other to try their Judo Holds. They nearly killed each other in a brawl, but this little chap just knocked them both out with a squeeze to the back of their necks we had to drag them to the shower to bring them round. He had undivided class attention after that !!

Keltic Star
31st December 2011, 04:55
I remember that we often shipped out in the "Wendy" from Wapping Basin with a couple of Engineer Officer trainees from Poplar Tech. These unfortunates were persuaded that they were to have a few days practical engineering training - whereas I seem to remember them being used as trimmers and stokers and seeing the whites of their eyes in the bunkers when we tipped in the bags of coal at Wapping!


Over to you........

Jim Martin

Lucky for you Jim, I was there a year after you and without engineer trainees we had to cut cards to see who was going to do the trimmimg. Fortunately I only lost the cut on one trip but the reward was a nice hot bath in the Captains cabin which sure beat the cold water bucket wash down in the lazarette.

Nova Scotian
31st December 2011, 14:59
The King Ted's Instructor that taught Cpt Jim Martin in 58 was still there in 63/64 - still teaching judo and self defence. Remember when he made a big mistake pairing us off each side of the mat, and in error, put two Nigerian Cadets ( from different tribes) against each other to try their Judo Holds. They nearly killed each other in a brawl, but this little chap just knocked them both out with a squeeze to the back of their necks we had to drag them to the shower to bring them round. He had undivided class attention after that !!

I was at King Teds from Nov 63 to Mar 64. I remember the judo instructor as a smallish, older guy who liked a cigarette. He was nick-named Scruff by the cadets. I also remember one of the Nigerian cadets as a large, friendly guy called Omoteso. I was to meet up with him again in 1968 when we sat for our second mate writtens in Dock Street. Essian was another cadet from Nigeria but much quieter.

If I recall correctly, other extra curricular activities included fencing and ballroom dancing which were scheduled in the evening somewhere in Fulham.

matthew flinders
1st January 2012, 19:58
Read recent posts re King Teds, posted by "Joe C" and "Mathew Flinders", which rang a few bells. The reference to a chap who took us for gym and swimming - "Diamond" - prompts the following reminiscences. I recall two separated individuals - but not the name "Diamond", although that might have been a nickname? When I was there 57/58, we had an ex Army wartime commando, a small hard little bugger who taught us boxing and self-defence skills in the buiding in the East End. When, later on I explained these latter skills to my brother, a RM Captain, he thought that they were pretty good, although basic. They included simple techniques for keeping someone with a knife at arms length, eye-gouging, strangulation, effective rabbit punching, creating weapons from things to hand etc - never ever had to use any of these, but like all of us I probably often ended up in low dives where it might have been necessary! Over to you........

Jim Martin

I had forgotten about the self defence things; like wrapping a coat around your arm to fend off the knife and using a rolled up newspaper as a weapon. I seem to recall that he also advocated that if throwing someone do it over the kerb as it would do more damage! The other thing he got us to do was to go out onto the Mile End Road and ask someone on the other side for the time and when you couldn't hear (or pretended to) get THEM to cross over the road to tell you! I have used the rolled up newspaper but now have my own watch.

Joe C
2nd January 2012, 20:10
I recall one incident involving our deadly PTI when two of us students were put in the boxing ring together by him and we were dancing around trying not to do any damage to each other which as you can imagine didn't meet with his approval! He stopped us,gave us a b*llocking and told us to get on with it.Not having any alternative we did and by a lucky fluke I connected on my opponent's nose causing an instant giant nose bleed.We were both covered in blood so we dropped our gloves and got out of the ring. He gave us another almighty bollocking but surprisingly let us go and get cleaned up.His retribution continued for the rest of the term as he used us to demonstrate all the different punches,hooks ,straight lefts etc and I know to this day if I hadn't blocked his straight lefts as instructed I wouldn't have any teeth.As it was, every time he hit my defensive glove I was stunned! If he had wanted to he could probably have removed my head.Amazing how fear can sharpen up the learning process !

capt jim martin
4th January 2012, 12:11
Thanks to "Nova Scotian" and others who continue to post things re King Teds. I recall now that the little PTI at Settle Street was indeed nicknamed "Scruff" and that the evening gym sessions were indeed somewhere in Fulham, which if my memory serves, would indeed have been close enough to run to and from Gloucester Road. Stll hoping for someone to pick up on my earlier suggestion re visiting Friends Reunited to look at King Teds photo thereon.

Someone earlier mentioned John Cass and the ex-Fairmile D used as radar training vessel for Radar Observer Cert - I think she was named "Sir John Cass"? Have beeen trying to track down a photo of her - any ideas. There is somewhere on this site a photo of the King Teds motor-launch "Magellan" mentioned earlier.

Keltic Star
5th January 2012, 07:30
"Magellan"
Here you go with photo credits to who ever sent it to me years ago.

Nova Scotian
5th January 2012, 14:11
During my time at KE VII we all wore navy blue blazers with the college badge on the breast pocket. Try as I may I have been unable to track one down or even find a picture of the badge. Perhaps someone at SN can post a picture or of know of one that's available.

Attached thumbnail shows my class wearing their blazers and was taken in 1964

Joe C
5th January 2012, 17:54
"Magellan"
Here you go with photo credits to who ever sent it to me years ago.

The Magellan alongside Cadogen Pier during 1953. I am the scruffy one not wearing a blazer!

China hand
5th January 2012, 18:57
During my time at KE VII we all wore navy blue blazers with the college badge on the breast pocket. Try as I may I have been unable to track one down or even find a picture of the badge. Perhaps someone at SN can post a picture or of know of one that's available.

Attached thumbnail shows my class wearing their blazers and was taken in 1964

Here we go NaScn: Vintage 1959. Cheers.

Ch Hnd

Joe C
6th January 2012, 10:36
In '53 there was no official uniform,we weren't required to wear blazers and I don't remember a badge. I must have thought it was clever to be different, wearing mostly a brown jacket but on every end of term report I was advised,"could pay more attention to his appearance"
I soon learned, when serving my time, it was a lot safer to merge into the background than stand out in a crowd.

borderreiver
6th January 2012, 12:18
I was up for my master when a King Ted young man for 2 mates went before the examiners wearing a flour bag. he was asked to leave.The senior examiner asked to see the principle of King Teds

Nova Scotian
6th January 2012, 14:18
Here we go NaScn: Vintage 1959. Cheers.

Ch Hnd

Thanks China Hand...that brought back a few memories. Got me thinking about studded collers (nothing like a pristine white coller attached to grubby white shirt) especially the plastic one that had to be worn on Sunday (I cant think why). It turned a light primrose colour over time!

Keltic Star
7th January 2012, 04:55
Thanks China Hand...that brought back a few memories. Got me thinking about studded collers (nothing like a pristine white coller attached to grubby white shirt) especially the plastic one that had to be worn on Sunday (I cant think why). It turned a light primrose colour over time!

That was caused by the London smog in those days. Spotless when you left the residence, black as coal by the time you got to the college.

capt jim martin
7th January 2012, 10:31
Thanks to "China Hand" for posting the jpg of the blazer badge. Can I download the image for my own use - and, if so, how?

In some group photos I have seen of King Ted's cadets, some were wearing blazers and some already in MN cadet/apprentice uniforms. Would I be right in thinking that the latter were sponsored by companies and were perhaps on the short three-month course? I have no recollection of any King Ted's lads actually wearing MN uniforms during their time at the college, so perhaps the group photos were taken at end of term?

Nice to see the photo of the "Magellan" again.

Best regards to all.

Nova Scotian
7th January 2012, 15:21
[QUOTE=capt jim martin;564580]Thanks to "China Hand" for posting the jpg of the blazer badge. Can I download the image for my own use - and, if so, how?

In some group photos I have seen of King Ted's cadets, some were wearing blazers and some already in MN cadet/apprentice uniforms. Would I be right in thinking that the latter were sponsored by companies and were perhaps on the short three-month course? I have no recollection of any King Ted's lads actually wearing MN uniforms during their time at the college, so perhaps the group photos were taken at end of term?

Nice to see the photo of the "Magellan" again.

Hi Capt J:

During my time at KE VII all the cadets wore a blazer and badge with grey flannel trousers, white shirt and black tie. If you are referring to the photo in my 14 August, 2006 post, the MN uniform was worn by my room mate. He had been accepted by RFA and was in the process of kitting out for sea. This was one of the last days of our time at King Teds. Most of us thought it was a little over the top but he seemed to get a kick out of it.

A small number of cadets were sponsored by companies especially the overseas trainees. However the majority secured apprenticeships during their last term at the college. Just goes to show how good the employment situation was in those days and how strong the industry was too.

Cheers.

Tom Wood
7th January 2012, 21:44
[QUOTE=capt jim martin;564580]Thanks to "China Hand" for posting the jpg of the blazer badge. Can I download the image for my own use - and, if so, how?

In some group photos I have seen of King Ted's cadets, some were wearing blazers and some already in MN cadet/apprentice uniforms. Would I be right in thinking that the latter were sponsored by companies and were perhaps on the short three-month course? I have no recollection of any King Ted's lads actually wearing MN uniforms during their time at the college, so perhaps the group photos were taken at end of term?

Nice to see the photo of the "Magellan" again.

Hi Capt J:

During my time at KE VII all the cadets wore a blazer and badge with grey flannel trousers, white shirt and black tie. If you are referring to the photo in my 14 August, 2006 post, the MN uniform was worn by my room mate. He had been accepted by RFA and was in the process of kitting out for sea. This was one of the last days of our time at King Teds. Most of us thought it was a little over the top but he seemed to get a kick out of it.

A small number of cadets were sponsored by companies especially the overseas trainees. However the majority secured apprenticeships during their last term at the college. Just goes to show how good the employment situation was in those days and how strong the industry was too.

Cheers.

NO relation to Capt. Wood but I remember the good and not so good times. I attended 50 or 51 not long after WW2 and had the best training under Capt. Chase, Miller, Fifield, glen Griffith all training on the MY Wendorian, liberty boat Magellan, whalers Lecy and somner.
Austrian Gulliver was the caretaker at Chromwell Rd and wold bore us with his violin playing in the blue room.
We had an ex-ABA boxer called Etchin ? who tried to toughen us up with plenty of thick lips, bloody noses and bruised sides.
I failed the MOT eye test (probably due to the tough up sessions and later tried as a sparring partner at Joe Louis gym over the public bar Thomas A'beckett in the Old Kent road.
I must have been punch drunk to tackle a light weight pro kid from Trinidad - Lots of more to put into a book form.
Would appreciate any stories you may have to add to my writing this book as a Nostagia days to King Teds.
Regards Tom.

China hand
8th January 2012, 18:35
I remember getting a bulwarking from Capt Ballard because I changed my blazer buttons to MN ( my Dads' oldies) buttons. Threatened me with "masquerading, false representation" , punishable by various ghastly things ( ended up polishing the office deck and replacing buttons in watch ashore time).

Take a copy of the badge if you want, folks: just don't ask me how to do it!

Belated Happy New Year to all.(*))

China hand
9th January 2012, 18:52
Just been told how to pick the pic with an iMac with OSX Lion.
Click on the attachment
Click on the pic
Click on your choice of saves
Whap.

Don't know what happens in Windows.
Best thought: ask grandkids or neighbours ten year old.

And you got a copy safely?? downloaded.

Aaah, we computer literate people are really something else, aint we?

Tom Wood
10th January 2012, 05:01
I remember getting a bulwarking from Capt Ballard because I changed my blazer buttons to MN ( my Dads' oldies) buttons. Threatened me with "masquerading, false representation" , punishable by various ghastly things ( ended up polishing the office deck and replacing buttons in watch ashore time).

Take a copy of the badge if you want, folks: just don't ask me how to do it!

Belated Happy New Year to all.(*))

Happy New Year to you and all.
China Hand - you knew Capt. Ballard ? When did you attend KE (sometime in the 50's ? )(Scribe)

msalter
10th January 2012, 10:41
Thanks (China Hand) for posting the Blazer Bladge. I have downloaded it very simply, right click and save as (file of ones own choice.) I used to have my own tucked away somewhere.
I see you were at King Teds the same time as myself and therefore I could possibly remember you if you were to disclose your name. Send me an e mail if you wish.
Very happy time spent at the college, but it was constant study if I remember, as everyone says, day and evening even Saturdays when 'on board' at Cromwell Road although I did play football for the college somewhere near Clapham?
Happy New Year to everyone aboard here

Dalby
10th January 2012, 15:43
Did my pre-sea training at King Teds in 1954 and 2nd Mates ticket in 1959. Great days! I have fond memories of the three months boarding in South Kensington and and of the lunchtime sessions in the pub across the road from the college ( long since demolished for road improvements) and returning late back for orals with Captains Frost , McBride Miller etc.

China hand
10th January 2012, 18:37
Happy New Year to you and all.
China Hand - you knew Capt. Ballard ? When did you attend KE (sometime in the 50's ? )(Scribe)

Hi Tom, and others, and best wishes for the forthcoming year to All.

I was in KE during 1959, went to sea in April 1960.

Anyone remember the Channel swim trips on Wendorian? Lowestoft , via Aldborough to the channel, then back and forth with the Butlins team on board and all sorts of radio buffs keeping contact.
Rowing the Old Man ashore to obtain, and then listening to the "clink" of the necessary navigational supplies so obtained, on the row back. Way to go!!

Tom Wood
15th January 2012, 03:02
(Scribe)Just for the record, King Edward's was the next step in the education of many ex pupils of the Royal Merchant Navy School who followed their fathers into the Merchant Navy. As Alumni Secretary for the Old Royals Association I am in touch with quite a few of them from the 1940s and 1950s.

Just came across your thread - I was at KE 50/51 and would like to know if the college exists or has moved.
Living in the States and hope to visit U.K. in spring 2012.
I've tried to contact others but without response and have many stories to tell about the college.
You may email me respondtom@aol.com.
Wishing you a happy new year. regards Tom. (Scribe)

Tom Wood
17th January 2012, 21:59
Did my pre-sea training at King Teds in 1954 and 2nd Mates ticket in 1959. Great days! I have fond memories of the three months boarding in South Kensington and and of the lunchtime sessions in the pub across the road from the college ( long since demolished for road improvements) and returning late back for orals with Captains Frost , McBride Miller etc.

I was at KE in 51 and had the best trainning with some good and not so good times.
We got caught skinny dipping in Hyde Park by 2 local bobbies - one just happen to be a women.
I've tried to contact others but no success - Can you tell me if KE still exists and how to contact - I'm trying to put a log together so those never again times are kept for Nostalgia.
Any moments you remember do let me know and if you want your name included in my log.
Regards Tom(Scribe)

Ronald G Dodsworth
19th January 2012, 10:05
I was at KE VII during 1st, Quarter 1953 and had a very enjoyable pre-sea training period. It was a pleasure to read back over the various posts and recall many names especially all of the lecturers in particular Captain Griffiths..a fine mariner. Gloucester Road bring back memories.

First company was Wm. France Fenwick on the "Rushwood" with fellow student David Blagg................who now resident in Newfoundland.

allenr.
1st February 2012, 22:17
R594580. See previous thread! Did 2nd Mates at King Teds 1957-8. Great fun, passed everything except signals......bloody semaphore!!! Hated it.
Dave.

Hi Dave, I too sat second mate around that time, many sat but only six of us passed, one of the first who had to sit radar cert before we got our second mates ticket printed. Went to K.E.V11 pre sea for a year aroung 1954-55, Capt Johanson used to take us for boat and sail training, but can't remember which dock. now live in Earthquake city of Christchurch NZ. Sadly havent been home to my old home in Buckhurst Hill .Essex since I passed second mates in 1958
regards Rob Allen.

Joe C
2nd February 2012, 12:55
We did our sailing and rowing in the West India Dock and on at least one occasion hurtled up and down the Thames with Capt. Tulloch in charge.I don't recollect ever wearing a life jacket?

Tom Wood
20th February 2012, 02:20
Just for the record, King Edward's was the next step in the education of many ex pupils of the Royal Merchant Navy School who followed their fathers into the Merchant Navy. As Alumni Secretary for the Old Royals Association I am in touch with quite a few of them from the 1940s and 1950s.

I was at KEVll in '51 and looking for any class mates still around.
Trying to log a scrip of all the good and fun times, happenings that took part - any year for posterity and nostalgia.
Don't believe any book form or write-up exists re: this fine upstanding and one of a kind nautical college.
Appreciate any response.
Tom.
(Applause)

Davyth
5th May 2012, 09:42
It's a few years later than your post, but there was so much there that resonated! The names just sprang back into my memory and I relived the time at KEVII once again!

Joe C
5th May 2012, 20:53
"Magellan"
Here you go with photo credits to who ever sent it to me years ago.

I'm the one leaning on the cabin and seem to remember that the boat moored on the other side of the pontoon at Cadogan pier was also used for training. Any ideas on identity?
(See earlier posting of the Magellan photo)

Joe C
3rd June 2012, 13:14
Watching the preparations for the Jubilee Pageant.
What a shame the old Wendorian is long gone.She would have looked a treat in St.Katherines dock where she regularly berthed.

matthew flinders
4th June 2012, 19:18
Watching the preparations for the Jubilee Pageant.
What a shame the old Wendorian is long gone.She would have looked a treat in St.Katherines dock where she regularly berthed.
Probably would not have seen her as the BBC coverage, of the vessels, was very patchy and disappointing. Too many 'celebs' and too few boats.
Not been into St Katherines Dock on Wendorian only Wapping Basin but has gone as well now.

Joe C
5th June 2012, 12:24
Probably would not have seen her as the BBC coverage, of the vessels, was very patchy and disappointing. Too many 'celebs' and too few boats.
Not been into St Katherines Dock on Wendorian only Wapping Basin but has gone as well now.

Was fortunate on one occasion to join her in Lowestoft and came round the coast and up the Thames,what an experience for a sixteen year old.
Unfortunately on the way up the Thames we hit a submerged obstacle,the river was filthy then and full of flotsam and jetsum,which damaged the propellor and we had to limp into Deptford Creek.
Obvious joke of the day"up Deptford Creek without a propellor"
I also remember very well getting pantry duty and scraping plates of uneaten tinned pilchards into the slops bucket and trying not to add to the mess.Must have been choppy!

Mark Harris
24th July 2012, 11:30
Apologies for cross-posting if you've already seen this elsewhere.

Captain Warren Hopwood, whose first teaching post was at King Ted's when it was the Nautical *School*, died on 14 July 2012 aged 88. The funeral was held on 23 July.

Wish him safe passage through uncharted waters.

Mark
====

papayanni
28th July 2012, 17:08
I was at King Teds for the four month pre-sea course, September 1962 to December 1962.

I remember the smogs and the noise of Cromwell Road. And the LCC Stepney Insititute where most lessons were held, (I think?).. And 4 fabulous days on the Glen Strathallen off the Thames estuary. And rowing a whaler in West India Dock. And we learned small boat-handling on the Cabot, a small but nippy motor boat moored against the Wellington.

And I remember watches and being duty officer for the evening, ringing the bell, etc.. And lots of homework and study... and playing football against Port watch (I was Starboard), up at the Wormwood Scrubs pitches..... it was all great, working on charts, learning navigation theory, necessary maths, etc..I even remember we had to pick one evening class a week on any subject of oyr choice. I think that's really imaginative, instigates a sense of the importance of continual learning which I've not forgot... I thoroughly enjoyed the whole thing, the teachers were very good mostly, and it made me really want to get to sea and I felt well-prepared when I joined my first ship.

Hat's off the King Edward VII Nautical College, a great institution.

Tom Wood
9th August 2012, 21:37
I was up for my master when a King Ted young man for 2 mates went before the examiners wearing a flour bag. he was asked to leave.The senior examiner asked to see the principle of King Teds

That's interesting and good to add to the book I'm trying to write about KEV11 (Scribe)
I was one of the early birds - did a full course in 1951
Would appreciate you telling the full story, the period and any other interests happen while you were at the college.
Are you in touch with others ?

Either on here or go to my (open) email respondtom@aol.com