OLNA and LEANDER

Fairfield
29th March 2005, 18:48
Marvellous model at the Museum at Portsmouth of OLNA doing a RAS with HMS LEANDER.
Think OLNA was the only one of the OL/s to keep her original name;OLEANDER becoming OLMEDA because of LEANDER and OLYNTHUS becoming OLWEN because of sub OLYMPUS.
In recent times FORT GRANGE has become FORT ROSALIE to avoid confusion with FORT GEORGE.

flyer682
29th March 2005, 20:51
There really are some fabulous models about!
Interesting about the name changes.

Tmac1720
9th August 2005, 20:02
I well remember OLNA in H&W for re-fit. A nightmare of a job, so bad we christned her Oh Lord Never Again. Everything that could go wrong did! (Night) But we managed to get her back in service on time and on budget. Well we were a shipyard in those days.

fred henderson
9th August 2005, 22:58
When Olna were designed by Hawthorn Leslie we had to incorporate two very special requirements. Firstly the ships had to be able to carry out a RAS in nuclear fall-out conditions. All cargo valves and winches had hydraulic remote control systems. We had no idea how much pipework would be involved, so we just bought 5 miles of pipe per ship. It was insufficient.
The second inovation was that the ships had bridge control for the steam turbines. Until the Olna class, the fleet replenishment ship plodded along in at steady pace and the Carrier came alongside and matched the oiler's speed. In the Olnas the procedure was reversed and the RFA Captain was provided with a bridge lever to match the carrier's speed.
The MoD decided that the only way this system would work would be to eliminate all back-up controls to prevent them working against each other. My memory is failing as to which ship was involved, but when either Olna or Olynthus were on full load trials and proceeding at full astern, the single manoeuvering valve spindle fractured. The only way the ship could be stopped was to close down the boilers. At full displacement however the ship could not re-enter the Tyne and the pumps were steam driven.
Most of you old salts will know that it is not possible to achieve long term directional control of a conventional ship going astern. The ship begins to turn in a ragged circle and spiral upwind. This is what happened and thankfully she set off in circles towards Norway, pumping tanks, chased by George V and other members of the Tyne tug fleet. An attempt was made to land a replacement spindle by helicopter, but the RAF pilot decided that he did not want to make his first deck landing on ship without a heli-deck crew that was going astern in circles!

Fred

R736476
16th September 2005, 18:06
Fred,
Even prior to the OLs the practice was for the replenishment ship to keep station on the carrier - could be great fun and games down the black hole on a RAS on the earlier Waves and Tides responding to the bridge commands as we chased the carrier.
For replenishing warships up to cruiser size (long time now since we had any), the warship kept station on the RFA.
It wasn't plain sailing with the bridge control in the early days of the OL's as the AEI boiler feed pump control system left a lot to be desired in responding to demands put upon the boilers by the bridge and cargo transfer pumps during a RAS. Don't know whether they eventually sorted the problems.
Cheers
Alex

Eddie Wallace
1st November 2005, 11:51
Reading about OLNA brought back many great memories of my time on her,the captain let me take my motorbike with me it was kept in the firemans mess which was'et used that trip,and the stand left two great holes in the deck.Did exercise Sea Lance on her and I remember about to start to oil a ship ifired the poker with the line over to the navy ship without the warning and cleared the navy deck of sailors who were waiting to pick up the line ,that was the first and last time I got to fire the line accross to any ship.Great days ,I paid off in Hull (i think) and had to ride my bike all the way back to Glasgow,seeing the look on the customs mans face when he saw my bike was priclesss.Anyone know how to turn the clock back?

R58484956
1st November 2005, 13:38
Welcome Eddie, enjoy the site you are now amongst the sea loving fraternity, most of us left years, possibly like yourself, but our minds are still there.

Doug Rogers
2nd November 2005, 02:46
Welcome aboard Eddie, thanks for your tale and look forward to your next.

Fairfield
2nd November 2005, 06:09
Indeed.It would be nice to go back if we could get a chance,maybe once a year to relive something nice for a day !

Eddie Wallace
4th November 2005, 20:14
many thanks for the nice welcome ,went to sea in 1949 left in 1959 ,joined army did ten years then the regiment was disbanded went back to sea for another four years then came ashore ,worst thing that I ever did.

douglasjamesmichael
20th January 2007, 22:22
When Olna were designed by Hawthorn Leslie we had to incorporate two very special requirements. Firstly the ships had to be able to carry out a RAS in nuclear fall-out conditions. All cargo valves and winches had hydraulic remote control systems. We had no idea how much pipework would be involved, so we just bought 5 miles of pipe per ship. It was insufficient.
The second inovation was that the ships had bridge control for the steam turbines. Until the Olna class, the fleet replenishment ship plodded along in at steady pace and the Carrier came alongside and matched the oiler's speed. In the Olnas the procedure was reversed and the RFA Captain was provided with a bridge lever to match the carrier's speed.
The MoD decided that the only way this system would work would be to eliminate all back-up controls to prevent them working against each other. My memory is failing as to which ship was involved, but when either Olna or Olynthus were on full load trials and proceeding at full astern, the single manoeuvering valve spindle fractured. The only way the ship could be stopped was to close down the boilers. At full displacement however the ship could not re-enter the Tyne and the pumps were steam driven.
Most of you old salts will know that it is not possible to achieve long term directional control of a conventional ship going astern. The ship begins to turn in a ragged circle and spiral upwind. This is what happened and thankfully she set off in circles towards Norway, pumping tanks, chased by George V and Cargoother members of the Tyne tug fleet. An attempt was made to land a replacement spindle by helicopter, but the RAF pilot decided that he did not want to make his first deck landing on ship without a heli-deck crew that was going astern in circles!

Fred


The Boiler Feed Pumps onboard were Weir TWL as were the Cargo Oil Pumps and Turbines....I know I worked on them.......

Pat Thompson
21st January 2007, 11:44
Olna :- O Lord Never Again
Olwen :- O Lord Whatever Next
Olmeda :- O Lord Make Every Day Agreeable.

Aye

Pat Thompson

dom
21st January 2007, 11:53
can remember doing some time on the old Olna 1960,up the gulf West Indies 6th destroyer flotila??then up the artic circl refueling them not a bad ship

STRAWBERRY
21st January 2007, 14:06
Served on Olmeda, a Great ship and brilliant Crew...crappy but happy. was part of the 50th Anniversery for the Battle of the atlantic in Liverpool. HMY Brittania had a sail past with Queen. Captain said we all had to doff caps and cheer...we didn't want to so we got the union involved. eventually having first said we "had to" by our Captain, turned out to be "If you want to" so thoes of us who Didn't want to were sent to the crew mess. Turned out that only 9 people lined the rail to cheer the Queen!
I could picture the Queen talking to Charles as she sailed past saying..."One Wonders...Such a small crew for a ship so large"

PS The Model was originally in the Foyer of the Empress state Building in London (Then the home of the RFA)

Anubis
10th April 2008, 16:46
I was on the Oleander on it's first trip to the far east. As the ship was slowing down to turn into the stores basin at Singapore Dockyard a taper pin fell out of the astern main steam valve spindle. As some fool had fitted the pin inside the bulkhead of the control room nobody knew what had happened, apart from the fact that the 3rd Engineer was opening the valve and nothing was happening.
We smashed one tug against a boom defense vessel and another against the Fearless. Luckily, the tugs managed to hold us, and we stopped no more than 10 feet astern of the Leander class frigate Cleopatra, who we would have cut in half.
I was in the MCR at the time and found the experience somewhat worrying, espeacially when the Chief Electrician started praying.