Breakdown

japottinger
26th August 2007, 21:33
Arriving in the Thames on or about 21/4/1960 on SS Manipur and on river passage we noted that the vacuum had suddenly disappeared, such that we could not carry on underway, so had to anchor in the Thames somewhere off Southend.
We searched high and low for any leaks but could not find anything that could explain the leak.
After a while when we were all sitting on the eng. platform scratching our heads we noted a wisp of steam coming from the LP turbine casing, and on peeling back the lagging (asbestos, what else!) we could see the vapour issuing from a crack just beside the large square inspection cover in the top cover of LP turbine.

After much discussion with Johnny McCallum Chief Eng. it was decided to try and patch with a Thistlebond fibreglass kit, and after gouging out a small groove along the crack we slapped on some goo, and after curing he decided that provided the we held full vacuum with stern power on we would chance going up river.
Sting in the tail was that when we tried to lift the anchor we found it had fouled a submarine cable across the Thames!
To cap it all the pilot then moaned to Capt. Mackenzie that he was going to be late for a do ashore, I have it for good authority from the 3rd mate that the said pilot was given the opportunity to leave the bridge in a orderly fashion, or take his chances in the briny! Capt Mac said to the pilot "you think you have problems-----!"
To explain, this was the same trip that the Manipur stripped her main gear wheel coming out of the locks at Newport prior to the voyage, which resulted in a 6ins wide strip being machined out of the main wheel and mating secondary gear, and subsequently did the trip at about 65 RPM instead of about 112 RPM, burnt out bilge and ballast pump and wrecked a Ruston generator at Aden outward bound, then with Weir turbo steam feed pump on all trip on instead of the electrical pump to reduce the electrical load and nursed the two remaining gennys for the whole trip. To cap it all a main steam joint blew as we docked at Tilbury, by that time nobody gave a s---, and we just let it whilstle away merrily all the while we were docking.
Last I saw of the good ship Mainpur was after paying off and at home on ticket leave I took a photo of her passing Greenock on her way up to Glasgow to have a new Ruston fitted.

Hugh Ferguson
26th August 2007, 23:14
Arriving in the Thames on or about 21/4/1960 on SS Manipur and on river passage we noted that the vacuum had suddenly disappeared, such that we could not carry on underway, so had to anchor in the Thames somewhere off Southend.
We searched high and low for any leaks but could not find anything that could explain the leak.
After a while when we were all sitting on the eng. platform scratching our heads we noted a wisp of steam coming from the LP turbine casing, and on peeling back the lagging (asbestos, what else!) we could see the vapour issuing from a crack just beside the large square inspection cover in the top cover of LP turbine.

After much discussion with Johnny McCallum Chief Eng. it was decided to try and patch with a Thistlebond fibreglass kit, and after gouging out a small groove along the crack we slapped on some goo, and after curing he decided that provided the we held full vacuum with stern power on we would chance going up river.
Sting in the tail was that when we tried to lift the anchor we found it had fouled a submarine cable across the Thames!
To cap it all the pilot then moaned to Capt. Mackenzie that he was going to be late for a do ashore, I have it for good authority from the 3rd mate that the said pilot was given the opportunity to leave the bridge in a orderly fashion, or take his chances in the briny! Capt Mac said to the pilot "you think you have problems-----!"
To explain, this was the same trip that the Manipur stripped her main gear wheel coming out of the locks at Newport prior to the voyage, which resulted in a 6ins wide strip being machined out of the main wheel and mating secondary gear, and subsequently did the trip at about 65 RPM instead of about 112 RPM, burnt out bilge and ballast pump and wrecked a Ruston generator at Aden outward bound, then with Weir turbo steam feed pump on all trip on instead of the electrical pump to reduce the electrical load and nursed the two remaining gennys for the whole trip. To cap it all a main steam joint blew as we docked at Tilbury, by that time nobody gave a s---, and we just let it whilstle away merrily all the while we were docking.
Last I saw of the good ship Mainpur was after paying off and at home on ticket leave I took a photo of her passing Greenock on her way up to Glasgow to have a new Ruston fitted.

That pilot must have been one of my colleagues and I just cannot believe that, after having been responsible for anchoring in a foul anchorage, he then complained about being delayed! Being delayed was a way of life in the Thames pilotage. It was a rarity to make a full speed, direct passage to Gravesend. But to complain about being delayed in those circumstances and threatened with being heaved overboard is patent nonsense.

Derek Roger
27th August 2007, 01:36
It sounds as though Sl--py Maknenzie woke up with this incident ??

japottinger
27th August 2007, 15:33
Not sure Hugh if you mean it was nonsense for pilot to complain, or it was nonsense for me to relate the incident, which indeed happen. In fact the pilot could not be held responsible for anchoring in a foul area, we had no option as we had lost all engine power.