Teekay Shipping

Paul Barford
3rd September 2007, 12:11
(Thumb) Have started this thread as I of know quite a few former and currently serving members in SN.
Although when the company was started, it was not well known in Europe as most of it's trade was around the Pacific rim/middle and far east. It has risen to become a large company with offices in Vancouver,Houston,Glasgow,Singapore,Oslo,Perth to name but a few.
With the decline of British and European companies,people of varying nationalities manned the early ships, a trend which continues and has expanded over the years. Sadly, like myself, British and European seaman are now dinosaurs and there are only a few of us left.
So, hello to you all!

Thamesphil
3rd September 2007, 12:31
Teekay is a true success story in my book. Founded by the late Torben Karlshoej, a Danish national, in 1973, it has grown to be one of the largest tanker owners in the World. In fact, following the joint purchase (with Torm)of the OMI Corporation fleet earlier this year, Teekay is now the World's third largest tanker owner in terms of vessel numbers, controlling a fleet of 85 ships. They are also a very pleasant company to deal with.

Phil

Jim MacIntyre
3rd September 2007, 18:37
Hello Paul
By any chance do you know of Tony Labella - last I was aware he was working in Teekay operations in Vancouver...
Cheers
Jim MacIntyre

cboots
4th September 2007, 04:37
Their vessels are quite well represented on the Australian coast, at least here in Victoria. I saw the Basker Spirit recently at Crib Point, Western Port, and from the constructions on her bow I'd say she is probably servicing the Baskar Oil field in the Bass Straits. Within the same few days another one of theirs was discharging at the oil facility at Hastings, but I can't remember her name.
CBoots

Jan Hendrik
4th September 2007, 08:02
CBoots,
Now this is a coincidence, I especially went to Crib Point TODAY to take a photo of the Basker Spirit, here you are, on SN still the very best service,
cheers
Jan
p.s. by the way trying to do some fishing in Western Port today, sh....house, so have to settle for a Burger from the local pub.

Jan Hendrik
4th September 2007, 08:10
Paul and Phil, thanks for your update on Teekay and as far as I remember it all started for them in Vancouver, and indeed an excellent company to deal with.

Some 85 ships todate? Quite something, but a lot under Management I guess?
They specialise in Management more than Ownwership as far as I am aware.
Nevertheless a fantastic company in the maritime world.
Jan

Thamesphil
4th September 2007, 09:03
Paul and Phil, thanks for your update on Teekay and as far as I remember it all started for them in Vancouver, and indeed an excellent company to deal with.

Some 85 ships todate? Quite something, but a lot under Management I guess?
They specialise in Management more than Ownwership as far as I am aware.
Nevertheless a fantastic company in the maritime world.
Jan

Jan,

Teekay was initially operated out of Long Beach, California. They moved out to Vancouver in the early 90s when the U.S. made it unfavourable for foreign nationals to operate. They are not a ship management outfit, most of their fleet is owned and has grown through acquisition of other companies, such as the OMI purchase this year, as well as investment in the newbuilding market. (Thumb)

Cheers,
Phil

Paul Barford
4th September 2007, 11:54
Hello Paul
By any chance do you know of Tony Labella - last I was aware he was working in Teekay operations in Vancouver...
Cheers
Jim MacIntyre
Jim,
Tony Labella is still going strong in Vancouver office and has various roles.He was probably the senior ship operator, or cargo manager,but since the companies rapid expansion his role has changed. His official title now is 'Buisness Information Specialist' which is part of the HSEQ department (health,safety and environmental quality).Just a couple of years ago I was carrying out 'Environemntal Audits' for TK vessels and he was and still is the acting co-ordinator for that team.A nice guy to deal with and a bit of a legend within Teekay.
best regards,
Paul

cboots
4th September 2007, 13:41
Thanks for posting the pic Jan, it is a good one. In exactly the same position as I saw her, even had that weird looking offshore type boat moored alongside her as well.
I think I posted elsewhere that Teekay were being tipped as a hot stock by some of the pundits a while back which caught my eye. Must be a while since a shipping concern were reckoned a good punt by the money boys, whatever logic they were applying.
CBoots

Jan Hendrik
4th September 2007, 15:50
Thanks for your info Phil. Appreciate.

CBoots, thanks, I could take the photo next to the pier as security did not let me in, but the small bbq spot next to it was a lot better.
Jan

Jim MacIntyre
4th September 2007, 18:33
Hi Paul
Glad to hear Tony is doing well. We worked together many many years ago at Seabrokers Inc. in New York. I could go on with tales of his escapades back then but they would only enhance the 'legend'.
Hint - if you get a chance to talk to him ask him about Sherman the Weimaraner and the empty New York apartment.....
Cheers
Jim MacIntyre

Paul Barford
5th September 2007, 11:30
Just a thought Jim,

If you would like to contact him, you can do so by sending me a PM and I will send you his email address.

Cheers,
Paul

Bill Davies
9th September 2007, 08:36
Jan,

Teekay was initially operated out of Long Beach, California. They moved out to Vancouver in the early 90s when the U.S. made it unfavourable for foreign nationals to operate. They are not a ship management outfit, most of their fleet is owned and has grown through acquisition of other companies, such as the OMI purchase this year, as well as investment in the newbuilding market. (Thumb)

Cheers,
Phil

To be more specific, they moved because of their objection to OPA 90.
There are few , if any, ship managers who do not own their own ships although it might not be patently obvious. The initial concept of ship manager was not to offer a service but to separate the 'beneficial ownership' from the operation. Primarily used as a defence against the ITF.

cybersalem
3rd September 2008, 02:05
Jan,

Teekay was initially operated out of Long Beach, California.

Cheers,
Phil

Actually, TK was started in CT when Torben was living in CT. He then moved the office to NYC into the Cunard Bldg. on 5th Ave. I was Torben's secretary in another shipping company from 1970-1974, and then his Admin. Asst. at TK from 1974-1975. He then left for CA and I stayed behind. I did meet up with him again around 1978 or 1979 when he was in the Bahamas. I stayed with him and his one of his daughters for a few days.

Orbitaman
3rd September 2008, 06:43
"There are few , if any, ship managers who do not own their own ships"

There are plenty of ship managers who do not own their own ships.

Here in Limassol, I know of at least six ship managers who own no ships, nor do the owners of the ships have any link with the managers beyond that of the business agreement to manage the ships.

One of these managers manage in excess of 300 ships and have no ownership links with any of the ships they manage.

My own employers, whilst ship owners in there own right, manage a number of ships for other clients who have no links with the company other than management of the vessels.

Brian Locking
3rd September 2008, 08:07
"There are few , if any, ship managers who do not own their own ships"

There are plenty of ship managers who do not own their own ships.

Here in Limassol, I know of at least six ship managers who own no ships, nor do the owners of the ships have any link with the managers beyond that of the business agreement to manage the ships.

One of these managers manage in excess of 300 ships and have no ownership links with any of the ships they manage.

My own employers, whilst ship owners in there own right, manage a number of ships for other clients who have no links with the company other than management of the vessels.

How can you say with certainty?

The only individuals who know the true Beneficial Ownership of a vessel within a ship Management company is the Owner (obviously), the Bank and the Lawyers. I have worked for Greek and Cypriot managers who distance themselves from ownership for ITF purposes. I have sat in front of ITF officials in London arguing over Blue Cards/AMOSUP agreements and such never as Fleet manager never knowing the truth. My guess is that you are wrong and the managers you refer to do infact own some of the ship within the fleet.

Brian

Orbitaman
3rd September 2008, 08:45
How can you say with certainty?

The only individuals who know the true Beneficial Ownership of a vessel within a ship Management company is the Owner (obviously), the Bank and the Lawyers. I have worked for Greek and Cypriot managers who distance themselves from ownership for ITF purposes. I have sat in front of ITF officials in London arguing over Blue Cards/AMOSUP agreements and such never as Fleet manager never knowing the truth. My guess is that you are wrong and the managers you refer to do infact own some of the ship within the fleet.

Brian

Brian,

You are welcome to your 'guess', but I stand by my assertion that some of these managers are managers only and nothing more.

Brian Locking
3rd September 2008, 10:50
Brian,

You are welcome to your 'guess', but I stand by my assertion that some of these managers are managers only and nothing more.

Well done, you have answered in the only way possible. Interocean would be happy with your response.

Chouan
3rd September 2008, 13:43
What a completely pointless argument. You can't prove Orbitaman wrong, he can't prove himself right, so is there any purpose to it beyond point scoring?
Both a Cadet and a Master I sailed with in Tradax, as far as I know, work for them now. Last I heard they both thought them a good outfit.

Brian Locking
3rd September 2008, 14:32
What a completely pointless argument. You can't prove Orbitaman wrong, he can't prove himself right, so is there any purpose to it beyond point scoring?
Both a Cadet and a Master I sailed with in Tradax, as far as I know, work for them now. Last I heard they both thought them a good outfit.

Oh yes! And what exactly is your point?

Orbitaman
3rd September 2008, 14:50
Well done, you have answered in the only way possible. Interocean would be happy with your response.

Perhaps you can enlighten me as to who are Interocean and where they come into this?

My original point was that another member asserted all managers own ships and I believe otherwise.

Your view as to whether he or I am wrong is quite irrelevant . Your response to Chouan likewise, other than being provocative and unnecessary?

Chouan
3rd September 2008, 15:50
Oh yes! And what exactly is your point?

I think that my point was clear in my post. I was neither being elliptical nor opaque, neither ironic nor allegorical. If you read it again the meaning should be transparent, but, in case you need it to be spelled out, I'll run through the sequence of posts to make it clear to you.

A member made a generalised assertion:

"There are few , if any, ship managers who do not own their own ships"

Orbitaman said that he, in his experience, disagreed. You contradicted him, on no other evidence than your say so, not even knowing which company he works for:

"My guess is that you are wrong and the managers you refer to do infact own some of the ship within the fleet."

Orbitaman, referring again to his own experience of the company that he works for defended his position.

There it should have ended. There is no purpose in such an argument continuing as neither side can prove or disprove their assertions, and it would be fruitless to attempt to do so. Anything beyond this stage is no longer an exchange of views or an argument, but an assertion of personality. You then take things to that next stage with your next comment, which is why I made my post.
This post explains that post more fully. Is my point clear now?

Brian Locking
3rd September 2008, 18:16
Perhaps you can enlighten me as to who are Interocean and where they come into this?

My original point was that another member asserted all managers own ships and I believe otherwise.

Your view as to whether he or I am wrong is quite irrelevant . Your response to Chouan likewise, other than being provocative and unnecessary?

If you need enlightenment on Interocean then perhaps you are best left in the dark.

My views on this forum are not irrelevant and every much as valid as your own.

randcmackenzie
3rd September 2008, 22:40
I worked for Denholm Ship Management (DSM), one the largest ship managers of their day. Though the Denholm family owned ships which were managed by DSM, and had an interest in some others, the vast majority of owners with ships under management had no connection with DSM whatsoever, other than paying the expenses and monthly management fee.

The owners were so diverse and put ships under management so quickly, it would have been impossible for the managers to own or part own them. American, Greek, British, Swedish, Saudi, Emirates, Norwegian, Swiss, Thai, Indonesian, Japanese to name but a few.

And as quickly took them away, in many cases.

Orbitaman
4th September 2008, 10:39
"My views on this forum are not irrelevant and every much as valid as your own."

Bryan,

You views within the SN forum are on the whole relevant as are other members. However, in this particular thread your 'guess' serves no relevance to the topics being discussed other than to be provocative.

Brian Locking
5th September 2008, 00:20
My 'Guess' is based on 17 years in Ship Management. Six of which was spent in Cyprus. If you read provocation in my posts thats is for you. I read nievety and inexperience in yours.

Orbitaman
5th September 2008, 06:18
A guess is still a guess, however you try to dress it up.

I'm sorry that my 31 years of experience and naivety in the shipping industry makes me inexperienced in yours eyes, especially when compared to your 32 years experience as per your profile!

Or do you have a CV in your cupboard that you want to conceal from us?

No more from me on this subject. Roll credits, fade to black.....

Brian Locking
5th September 2008, 08:53
Strange how my simple post #16 evolved into this.
However, I am now convinced in the arithmetic inability of STCW candidates
I commenced my career in 62 (when were you born?) and still involved in management. I won't do the sums for you.

additional text removed

Brian Locking

non descript
5th September 2008, 09:51
Gentlemen,

Please take a break....

Different opinions are part and parcel of life, but allowing the emotions that such differences cause to escalate into a personal attack, is not the way that this Site wishes to move and the Moderators would ask everyone to take step back. The overtly rude comments have been removed, but the postings have been left, as to remove all of them smacks of undue control and that is NOT what we are about.

Please enjoy the Site for what it is – a forum for pleasant discussion – we can leave the fighting to others.
(Thumb)
Mark

Chouan
5th September 2008, 10:01
Well done for intervening, I thought that assertion of personality was intruding some time ago, and said so. Much good it did me!

topgun28
14th April 2009, 22:53
Hi Jim
Tony retired from Teekay in 2008 from the Vancouver office.

jep1916
5th February 2014, 14:08
Is there any ex TK Tankers people out there. I worked for TK as C/E from 1992 until 1996 and the personnel office was in Glasgow. I was on the following ships:-
Palmstar Monarch
Pacific Spirit
Shilla Spirit
Cloudsdale
Luzon Spirit
Mayon Spirit
Palmstar Rose

John Price

Wallace Slough
5th February 2014, 17:18
Good Morning John
I was the contract pilot for TK in San Francisco and piloted all the ships you mentioned with the exception of the Cloudsdale. They were a fine company at that time, and had exceptionally clean and well run ships. They were fortunate enough to glean excellent senior officers from the oil companies and Sanko when they both decided to exit the transportation business. That combination of excellent staff, the availability of good ships with the demise of Sanko, and Torben's business expertise and ship charters made for an excellent company.

Wallyh
5th February 2014, 23:27
Yes did a trip in the TK Vision back in 1989

jep1916
6th February 2014, 12:11
Hi Wallace,

Good to hear from you. You are quite correct in stating that TK was an excellent company. I remember seeing one of their ships in Singapore in 1990 and saying to myself that I had to look into getting more information about the company and seeing if they had any vacancies for C/E's. I finally did this in 1992 after seeing an advert for sea going staff in the Lloyds List and much to my surprise the personnel office was in Glasgow, which is only a four hour drive from where I live in England. Also, to my surprise the Personnel Manager was an ex Denholm man, who I knew. Well, I got the job and joined the Palmstar Monarch In Sydney in July 1992. You may recall, that 1992 was a traumatic year for TK as the Nakasaki Spirit had the terrible collision in the Malacca Strait and TK himself died shortly afterwards. However, the company survived and went on to great things.

I wonder if you remember an incident in the San Francisco Bay area at a port called Benicia, ( Spelling may be incorrect ), in 1993 involving the Pacific Spirit. I was C/E on board and we had discharged a cargo at Benicia and when it came to leave the berth, we couldn't start the engine. No matter what we tried the Main Engine would not start and in the end we got towed to a safe area. I called in a company that I knew called West Winds and they managed to get hold of a specialist. After about 4 hours of inspections and poking about we suddenly discovered the root cause of the problem. The previous C/E had cleaned the Main Engine Air Cooler using a powerful solvent called ACC9. However, he had not flushed all the residue out when he finished and the ACC9 had slowly corroded some of the Air Cooler Tubes. While we were sitting at the berth at Benicia, the tubes finally went and water starting filling up the Air Cooler casing, causing a water seal and the air required for combustion couldn't get through. Also, the Air Cooler drain was blocked, so the water couldn't run off to the bilges.
Perhaps you also remember the Shilla Spirit losing the use of the Main Engine halfway across the Pacific Ocean, also in 1993. The vessel was in a tropical storm and the Main Engine Air Cooler drain was blocked, resulting in tonnes of water passing through the Main Engine causing very rapid wear down of the Main Engine Cylinder Liners and in the end, the vessel just came to a stop due to lack of combustion pressure.

If you would like to discuss TK Tankers further, get in touch via this sites private message system

Best regards
John Price

Wallace Slough
6th February 2014, 17:33
Good Morning John

I certainly do remember the incident with the Pacific Spirit. I set up and did the tow from Benicia to Anchorage 9, and we had four large tugs of a total 24,400 horsepower. As the ship only had about 10,000 HP as I recall, we flew down the bay! The rudder was operating OK, so we ended up steering the ship by herself and never used the tugs to steer. It's good to hear what actually happened with the engine, as I didn't know what caused the failure until now.

Teekay was an excellent company when we both worked for them, and I always enjoyed working with the excellent crews and their extremely clean ships. I do recall that the Pacific Spirit was very underpowered as they were built during a period when bunker fuel had gone through the roof. I remember that they didn't have enough power to get through the critical between slow and half ahead. I believe they were also the first ships that TK built themselves, and were to replace some of the older Sanko buildings. The later Onomichi built ships such as the Luzon and Mayon Spirit were far superior.

Good to hear from you, and I hope your doing well in retirement.

Wally

dannic
6th February 2014, 18:33
Hi John, joined TK in 96, and still here!! Shilla Spirit official cause for wear on all piston rings was ACC9 contaminating bunker fuel, I was chief on her after that and after prop was cropped and she was good as gold(ish). Shilla, Pioneer & Namsan spirit's all went on to become FSO's. And still in operation too.
Company much bigger now, fewer aframax and more LNG, FSO, Shuttle & suezmax. Among other things.
Dannic

Graham Wallace
6th February 2014, 18:51
Hi John, (and Wally Slough)

So john we meet in another Shipping Company. I know a couple of people who were ex BP EA's who in later life moved over to TK in the Vancouver Office, Bill Wallace and DM McDonald. Bill Wallace in mid 2000's moved back to TK Glasgow office and then retired. Roger Webster an ex 1965 BP NA eventually worked with TK out of Glasgow office

I recently came across an ex BP Navigating Apprentice Peter Williams who sailed Master with TK out of Vancouver on a number of ships (Mihara Spirit, Pinewell Spirit, Shilla Spirit, Palmstar Lotus, Samar Sprit, Seraya Spirit, Senang Spirit, Alliance Spirit, Koyagi Spirit, Palm Monarch, Palmstar Thistle.) I wonder if you ever came across him?

Wally, Years ago throughout my BP apprenticeship and following years I was always called 'Wally', it seems like a cross 'we' have to bear. In my father's era another favourite name for Wallace's was "Nellie". I never knew why the reference to Nellie Wallace or who they were !

Graham

Wallace Slough
6th February 2014, 20:06
Good Morning Graham

I remember Peter Williams very well. He was an excellent Captain whom I worked with on many occasions. Please give him my best regards.

One of the key ingredients that made Teekay successful were the excellent and highly trained Masters and Chief Engineers they were able to enlist from the oil companies and Sanko. The combination of British and European senior officers with Filipino crews made for excellent crewing. These senior officers were also able to pass that training on to their junior officers, who I assume man their ships today.

Wally (it's not such a bad moniker :-))

bishoch
6th February 2014, 23:05
Hi,
I was also C/E 1990 - 1996
ships:
Nagasaki Spirit
Golden Gate Sun
Koyo Spirit
Kyushu Spirit
Onozo Spirit
Oshima Spirit
Shilla Spirit
Palmstar Thistle
Mendana Spirit

Chris Bishop

Graham Wallace
6th February 2014, 23:27
Good Morning Graham

I remember Peter Williams very well. He was an excellent Captain whom I worked with on many occasions. Please give him my best regards.

One of the key ingredients that made Teekay successful were the excellent and highly trained Masters and Chief Engineers they were able to enlist from the oil companies and Sanko. The combination of British and European senior officers with Filipino crews made for excellent crewing. These senior officers were also able to pass that training on to their junior officers, who I assume man their ships today.

Wally (it's not such a bad moniker :-))

Wally,

I sent an email off to Peter just now, hopefully get a reply tomorrrow, he lives in UK.
I actually looked back at some of his old emails and he mentioned quite a lot of EX BP personnel ended up in TK, that sounds very fertile ground for me. I am a bit of an amateur unpaid historian for BP, I amongst other things maintain databases of both ex Engineering and Navigating Apprentices/Cadets, when they were cadets and also up the BP Promo ladder.

If there are any around I would be delighted to hear from them, over the last 15 years I have been in contact with 1000 ex BP seagoing personnel.

Wally, trouble is that word has a slightly different connotation in some areas of modern society. As in ,"a right wally!"

Graham

Graham Wallace
7th February 2014, 18:00
Wally,

I sent you an SN email this morning.

Graham

gadgee
7th February 2014, 19:47
gents

see this thread in "tankers"-
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=13502&highlight=teekay

I shall merge the threads once you have had time to peruse.

dannic
9th February 2014, 19:40
A new book recently published "Teekay - the first 40 years" worth reading, good on the early days especially.
ISBN978-0-620-56155-6, author Brian Ingpen, publisher Kattegat Ltd.
A coffee table book so could be pricy, we have one onboard.
Dan.

Scelerat
9th February 2014, 22:25
I sailed, along time ago, with a Cadet who subsequently became a Master with TK. If he is as good an Old Man as he was as a Cadet, he would be an outstandingly good Old Man. If Joey Coutinho ever reads this I was very pleased to have sailed with him.