Blue Funnel Nostalgia

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Bill Davies
9th September 2007, 12:46
Being a new boy to this site I have focussed my interest to reading as many threads as I can about the Blue Funnel as that is possibly where my nostalgia is rooted. For the first 6 years of my working life I was in the 'Blue Funnel' referred to as 'the China ' when I was there and on obtaining Second Mates (FG) left immediately knowing what was in store. Fourth Mate with a Second Mates (FG) Third Mate with a First Mates (FG) Second Mate with Masters (FG) then five years as Second Mate and then approx 12 years as Chief Officer. If you were prepared for that then the lifestyle was good. However, it does not help when passing Second Mates (FG) as a 21 year old AB to be told by Capt Ronnie Symons that if I kept my nose clean I would be Master when I was about 50. The high standards of the Blue Funnel officers were found in many British Companies to varying degrees but nothing to make an issue of. Apart from similar companies the promotion was faster elsewhere. So, I hear you asking what is this all about. The point I am making which set Blue Funnel apart from the rest of British Shipping was the training of their deck crew whether they were trained in Aberdovey (like me) or subsequent to 1958 in the Odyssey Works ( Mick Brabender & Dennis O'Brian). The training was excellent on board their ships and administered by Bosun's who were like no other Bosuns found elsewhere.
The Bosun really was a VIPs in 'the china'. The chain of command was Master, Mate and Bosun. I believe it was this structure that supported the officers and made the ships what they were. The years following departure from the Blue Funnel left me comparing the Bosun and crews in various companies againt their contempories in the Blue Funnel. None came near. It was the BF Bosuns and Deck Crew's that I miss and held the key to my nostalgia.

Hugh Ferguson
9th September 2007, 19:45
Bill, Welcome! Have a look at this "post." Maybe a face you recognise?!
I would be interested to know if you recognise any of the others I have posted. Come back to me if you get puzzled how to find them. Hugh.
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/66491/cat/500/ppuser/8509

Bill Davies
16th September 2007, 12:35
Like most companies we in the Blue Funnel had our fair share of characters with sometimed exotic nicknames such as 'Ale House Jones' (C/Off) Radar Rob (Master), Parson Williams (Master) and Bangor Bull (Bosun).
Any other memories and more importantly how the names were derived. Some do not take much working out.

Hugh Ferguson
16th September 2007, 13:39
Daylight Dark; Bullshit Harris; Pinky Johnson; Daddy Kersley; Gentleman Brown.
I leave another to ascribe reasons!

Hank
16th September 2007, 15:27
Motorbike Griffiths, Wristwatch Jackson, One Egg Turner (my favourite nickname), Belsen Boyd, Throstle the Apostle, Deeptank Jones, Farmer Gould, Teapot Gardner, and many unpublishable ones.

Bill Davies
16th September 2007, 16:37
Motorbike Griffths a Chief Stwd
Belsen Boyd Master
Deeptank Jones... Did he not ballast one of the DTks enroute Kobe to Hong Kong forgetting he had put transistor radio's in them at Kobe?

Hank
16th September 2007, 19:13
I don't recall the origin of the Deeptank nickname but your version sounds about right.
One Egg Turner got his nickname in the old saloons which had two long fore and aft tables. The Old Man sat at the head of the starboard one and the least important mortals sat at the bottom of the other. One morning an ever hungry first trip middy took the menu literally. It advertised 'Eggs to order' so he asked the steward to bring him two hardboiled eggs. The Old Man heard it and bellowed across the saloon "One egg, mister, one egg!" And the nickname stuck to him for the rest of his time at sea.

makko
17th September 2007, 04:17
I sailed with Motorbike. Certainly a character and he definitely took the other bus! He got the nickname from taking a motorbike out to the Far East and then riding back to Liverpool. When he got it off the train at Lime Street, the piston disintegrated!

Wristwatch Jackson was a Chief - His son was a good friend of my father. He used to buy wristwatches out in the Far East and pay off with them all up both arms!

Pops Blakemore - anyone remember him?
Yosser Marrowfat, the Squirrel, Supersonic, Little Ernest, Nobby Dave and the Humungous and Mini Mongous (12 to 4 specialists!).

Great thread! I'm going to mention it to the Old Fella and see what other Monikers he can come up with or explanations!

Regards,

Dave

Bill Davies
17th September 2007, 22:11
I sailed with Motorbike. Certainly a character and he definitely took the other bus! He got the nickname from taking a motorbike out to the Far East and then riding back to Liverpool. When he got it off the train at Lime Street, the piston disintegrated!

Wristwatch Jackson was a Chief - His son was a good friend of my father. He used to buy wristwatches out in the Far East and pay off with them all up both arms!

Pops Blakemore - anyone remember him?
Yosser Marrowfat, the Squirrel, Supersonic, Little Ernest, Nobby Dave and the Humungous and Mini Mongous (12 to 4 specialists!).

Great thread! I'm going to mention it to the Old Fella and see what other Monikers he can come up with or explanations!



Regards,

Dave

Dave,

Is you father an old 'china boat man'?
I've just thought of another 'Black Mac' (Capt McDavid). Sailed with him in 58 on the 'Antenor'.

Brgds

Bill

makko
18th September 2007, 19:44
Hi Bill,

Yes, my dad was a China Engineer. I was too, albeit on probably the last "traditional" boat and run, later the Far East on the Barber Blue Sea service.

Rgds.

Dave

Bill Davies
18th September 2007, 20:49
Dave,

Thanks the PM. You should be very proud of such a tradition.

Bill

Bill Davies
18th September 2007, 20:57
I understand Hughie Davies (Chwilog) passed away recently. I sailed with Hughie when he was Ch.Off in Ajax in 59. I was in the 'Peleus' in 61 and I believe he joined after I left. A very good shipmate.

rothesian
18th September 2007, 21:30
I sailed with Motorbike. Certainly a character and he definitely took the other bus! He got the nickname from taking a motorbike out to the Far East and then riding back to Liverpool. When he got it off the train at Lime Street, the piston disintegrated!

Wristwatch Jackson was a Chief - His son was a good friend of my father. He used to buy wristwatches out in the Far East and pay off with them all up both arms!

Pops Blakemore - anyone remember him?
Yosser Marrowfat, the Squirrel, Supersonic, Little Ernest, Nobby Dave and the Humungous and Mini Mongous (12 to 4 specialists!).

Great thread! I'm going to mention it to the Old Fella and see what other Monikers he can come up with or explanations!

Regards,

Dave

that wouldn't have been robin blakemore would it??

makko
18th September 2007, 22:17
Rothesian,

I am afraid that I don't know.

The day I started workshop time in Odyssey Works, a short old guy with a shock of white hair grabbed me and looking me in the face said," You're a "my surname", I should know, I sailed with your grandfather in the war and worked with your dad!". Relating this event to my father, he informed me that it was "Pops". I used to see him around the works and he would always ask how I was getting on or if I needed anything.

There was a daughter, Joan, went to school with my mother. She married George Shoan, coasting 3/E for Harrisons.

I will have to clear this up with the Old Fella!

Regards,

Dave

Hugh Ferguson
18th September 2007, 22:45
I understand Hughie Davies (Chwilog) passed away recently. I sailed with Hughie when he was Ch.Off in Ajax in 59. I was in the 'Peleus' in 61 and I believe he joined after I left. A very good shipmate.

I did not, 'till reading this, know that Hugh Davies had died. He was 3rd mate of the EMPIRE CAPULET (where I was a middy) during the war. Us middies were relieved in Calcutta after a mere 15 months. Other people continued to be relieved at different times. I only know of one other of that crew still living. He is Jeff White, R/O, and he and Jack Hurst, Chief Steward, were the only ones who remained in the ship until she arrived back in Liverpool 2 years and 3 months after leaving in Aug. 1944.
I often wonder if this was the longest war-time voyage of any merchant ship. Hugh Ferguson.

Bill Davies
18th September 2007, 23:17
I did not, 'till reading this, know that Hugh Davies had died. He was 3rd mate of the EMPIRE CAPULET (where I was a middy) during the war. Us middies were relieved in Calcutta after a mere 15 months. Other people continued to be relieved at different times. I only know of one other of that crew still living. He is Jeff White, R/O, and he and Jack Hurst, Chief Steward, were the only ones who remained in the ship until she arrived back in Liverpool 2 years and 3 months after leaving in Aug. 1944.
I often wonder if this was the longest war-time voyage of any merchant ship. Hugh Ferguson.

Hugh,

Hughie Davies was a great inspiration to me and other ABs in the Blue Funnel to go up for our Second Mates (FG). Hughie and Theo (Ale House) Jones were from the same village and both excellent seamen. Remember meeting Hughie in Chester in 66 (I was C.Mate in John I Jacobs....I'd caught up to him in rank only...but still felt like 3/O in his presence all 5' 03' of him) when he was in for the day shopping. Managed to have a pint and a very large Jamesons in the Dublin Packet and then I remember he bought a packet of Polo mints before meeting his others half in Browns the Departmental store.
I miss those days.

Bill Davies
21st September 2007, 21:34
Any of you sail with J.C. Liptrot, Bold, J Rae. Lulu Watson ?

makko
21st September 2007, 21:41
Bill,

Was J Rae Master?

Dave

Bill Davies
21st September 2007, 23:07
Bill,

Was J Rae Master?

Dave

Dave,

Liptrot, Rae & Bold were Ch.Off when I sailed with them in the late 50s. I assume all would have attained command by the mid 60s. Liptrot probably first. Lulu Watson who was Second Mate and probably attained C/Off around early 60s.
Johnny Rae had a 'growth' (like a nipple on his cheek. I think he was from Dundee. Rough as 'the proverbial' but no nonsense and fair. He would have retired around the very early 80s.

Is Odyssey works still standing?

Brgds

Bill

makko
21st September 2007, 23:29
My memory dims...........! Yes, I may have sailed under Capt. Rae, early 80's.

Odyssey was still there in 2006 - Atlantic Engineering had moved in, and looks like they are still there - I'm going to call my Dad tomorrow! Meanwhile, here is the web site:

http://www.atlanticeng.com/The%20Company.htm

My old fella gives them a hand from time to time, for obvious reasons. On one occasion, they "dropped" a tail shaft from an Irish Ferry in Lairds. Me and the Old Fella did the calcs for straightening it out - worked a treat!

Rgds.

Dave

rothesian
22nd September 2007, 15:51
Dave,

Liptrot, Rae & Bold were Ch.Off when I sailed with them in the late 50s. I assume all would have attained command by the mid 60s. Liptrot probably first. Lulu Watson who was Second Mate and probably attained C/Off around early 60s.
Johnny Rae had a 'growth' (like a nipple on his cheek. I think he was from Dundee. Rough as 'the proverbial' but no nonsense and fair. He would have retired around the very early 80s.

Is Odyssey works still standing?

Brgds

Bill


Sailed with J C Rae & Bold on Maron 1964/65 - Bold relieved Rae for my 2nd voyage as Middy - Both were still C\o's in 1967 when I left but I know that Rae did sail as Master on Perseus later when he was arrested in Shanghai - see this thread http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=10570

regards
Alistair

Bill Davies
22nd September 2007, 16:01
(Smoke) Sailed with J C Rae & Bold on Maron 1964/65 - Bold relieved Rae for my 2nd voyage as Middy - Both were still C\o's in 1967 when I left but I know that Rae did sail as Master on Perseus later when he was arrested in Shanghai - see this thread http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=10570

regards
Alistair

Thanks for that Alistair.

Bill

makko
22nd September 2007, 19:52
Hi Bill,

I spoke briefly with my Dad - He mentioned Granny Graves or Groves and Ginger Milne. Ginger has a "special" place in his heart!

He was sent as an apprentice to one of the steamboats, Ginger was the C/E. He felt very intimidated by Ginger, who asked him who he was and that he "would see if he was any good!" etc. He was given the job of refurbishing steam valves, which according to my Dad looked like they had come out of the scrap skip.

Anyway, he cleaned them up, lapped the valves, made joints etc. and as an after touch, got some paint and painted them up! They were maybe better than new. Ginger came down, obviously after a "long lunch", and inspected his work. His slurring reply, You're a good'un! I'm gonna tell the office that I want you to sail with me!". Needless to say, my Dad kept his head down for a few days and when the brand new Dolius came up, became a Motor man!

As a post script, he told his Old Fella at night of his "acquaintance" with Ginger, which brought hoots of laughter from the Old Bosun, who then said,"Did yer tell 'im ooo yer Dad is?", to which my father said no, "Oh! yer daft bugger!", said the old Seadog!

My father is now 71 yers old, with at least two people having made a "lasting" impression, Ginger and the dreaded Iain "Daggy" Dalgleish!

Regards,

Dave

Bill Davies
23rd September 2007, 11:20
Well Dave,
Your father has only 3 years on me.
Dalgleish I recall the name.
Other Odyssey names for your father:
Peaston (Drawing Office)
Bob Farquar (Engineers stores)
Duggie Jardine (Boat Shed)
Jack Ratchford (Marine Stores)

Allan James
23rd September 2007, 18:36
Bill,

Sailed with J C Liptrot on the Glenfalloch in 1978, he was a very senior Master at that point.

Regards

Allan

Bill Davies
25th September 2007, 17:06
Alan,
Thanks for your reply.
As I have indicated or implied in various threads I started in the Blue Funnel in 55 as a Deck Boy passing Second Mates (FG) November 61.
I sailed with several Master's and Ch.Officers who came 'up the hawse pipe' and in the main they were helpful and supportive. I am now thinking of Hughie Davies and Theo (Ale House) Jones and one or two others (there were never a lot in any case). Liptrot (off deck) does have pride of place in my memory as being the most unhelpful and objectionable of all the Mates I sailed with and was fortunate never to sail with him again. Hopefully he inproved with age. The only bad memory of my time in the Blue Funnel. He must have been 60 in 78.

Bill

Allan James
26th September 2007, 05:49
Bill,

I did two trips on the 'Falloch, she was a beautiful ship spoiled by the Masters. First trip was with a former Elder Dempster old man....... and what a clown he was. This was followed by John Liptrot, and rather sadly he hadn't mellowed with age from your experiences!!

Regards

Allan

Bill Davies
26th September 2007, 07:46
Allan,

Many thanks yours. I figured he had not as I walked around one of the new 'Ms' in Birkenhead in 78ish and noticed he was Master.

Brgds

Bill

Tai Pan
26th September 2007, 09:08
cocoa mcdonald. master

Tai Pan
26th September 2007, 09:09
black mac (mckenzie) master

railroadbill
26th September 2007, 16:50
Anyone sailed with Capt H O Williams from Anglesey?

Bill Davies
26th September 2007, 19:16
black mac (mckenzie) master

John,
I think you are referring to Capt (Black Mac) or (Cocoa) McDavid. He was from Upton on the Wirral.
His brother was Sir Herbert McDavid (MD of Glen Line).
Retired from the 'Peleus' as Senior Master (BF did not recognise the Commodore bit) in 66. Hughie Davies was Mate. Paddy Proctor the Senior Bosun.

Tai Pan
27th September 2007, 09:14
sorry bill, alex mckenzie was mate on glengarry, sailed together for 6 voyages, he was a super guy, but apparently when mader master, after i left bluies, he got the name black mac.
cocoa mcdonald was master, got his name from dark skin. had cocoa painted on side of calchas( middy ship) when leaving port said, or so the story goes.

Bill Davies
27th September 2007, 13:44
Disagree John,
Black Mac was MacDavid.
McDavid was Master when the middy's painted Cocoa on the 'half round' whilst alongside at Holt's Wharf.

duquesa
27th September 2007, 14:11
I did post this question some time ago but possibly on the wrong thread. Anyhow, any of you BF chaps ever hear or sail with Gordon Vickery. He was a cadet starting 1958. I would be interested to learn how his career developed.

Bill Davies
27th September 2007, 14:26
I did post this question some time ago but possibly on the wrong thread. Anyhow, any of you BF chaps ever hear or sail with Gordon Vickery. He was a cadet starting 1958. I would be interested to learn how his career developed.

Duquesa,

The name 'rings a bell' but other than that I am afraid I cannot help.

Bill

Tai Pan
27th September 2007, 15:39
not going to argue bill, memory slipping now, another one was buster brown, pinkey johnson.

Tai Pan
27th September 2007, 15:44
another was Pin Head, but I cant remember his surname, he became shore super at Gladstone about 1956

Bill Davies
27th September 2007, 15:54
Here's one for the 'real old timers' (its before my time).
'Big Sid Bainbridge' was Shore Bosun over Birkenhead and Liverpool.
Before him there was a Shore Bosun called 'Burst the Po'. Anyone remember his name??

John_Woodger
27th September 2007, 18:55
Cannot place Sid Bainbridge but I remember the name. But it brings to mind - "Right lads, same ship in the morning".

Hank
27th September 2007, 19:26
another was Pin Head, but I cant remember his surname, he became shore super at Gladstone about 1956Pinhead Collins

Bill Davies
27th September 2007, 23:32
A Bosun by the nickname 'The Ghoul'

Bill Davies
2nd October 2007, 11:38
Seem to recall we had our own way of doing things in 'the china'.
An example which readily comes to mind is the 'Lookout Reporting'.
One to Port, two to Stbd and three dead ahead. Everywhere else the P & S was reversed.
Any other 'strange BF' traditions

Peggy747
2nd October 2007, 12:01
Bosun in "Astyanax" 1957 "Stuttering Smith" any remember him? and I have a couple more on the tip of my tongue!

Bill Davies
2nd October 2007, 12:12
Bosun in "Astyanax" 1957 "Stuttering Smith" any remember him? and I have a couple more on the tip of my tongue!

Remember him well. Fine seaman! As all BF Bosuns were.

Peggy747
2nd October 2007, 12:19
"Astyanax" 1957-we played football against a native Borneo team in a kampong clearing up the Rejang River organised by the local agent Mr Sword, a really nice man --long ago ! remember having to hang a light in the trees for bearings, ? jump from boat into millions of mozzies?----No GPS then. Our Captain (Discharge Book) Capt Llewelyn?

Bill Davies
2nd October 2007, 12:22
I' ll have to dig out the Discharge book as I went 'around the land' in that ship. Did you ever sail with Bosun Jack Cleary?

Orestes
4th October 2007, 00:05
I have just joined, and loved reading about the Blue Funnel masters and mates nicknames. I sailed on the Antenor with Capt McDavid, and we called him Cocoa McDavid, I have never heard him referred to as Black Mac, but that would be quite possible. I sailed with Bold who was mate on the Ajax, and his nickname was Bastard Bold, for obvious reasons. I also sailed with the Bangor Bull, who was bosun on the Diomed when I was there '60/'61.
Although I never sailed with captain Rae, I did sail with his son geofdf Rae who was 5th Eng on the Diomed. Geoff lives here in Brisbane, and his son is now a tug master in Brisbane.He did a trip with me on an ANL ship when he was a cadet!! Small word.

Jim Quinn (Orestes)

makko
4th October 2007, 02:33
Thanks for the kind words, Jim!

I am trying to remember the story about Sid Bainbridge - I might have to resort to the Old Fella (Again!). I am positive that there is a good yarn to be told!

Regards,

Dave

Bill Davies
4th October 2007, 10:37
I have just joined, and loved reading about the Blue Funnel masters and mates nicknames. I sailed on the Antenor with Capt McDavid, and we called him Cocoa McDavid, I have never heard him referred to as Black Mac, but that would be quite possible. I sailed with Bold who was mate on the Ajax, and his nickname was Bastard Bold, for obvious reasons. I also sailed with the Bangor Bull, who was bosun on the Diomed when I was there '60/'61.
Although I never sailed with captain Rae, I did sail with his son geofdf Rae who was 5th Eng on the Diomed. Geoff lives here in Brisbane, and his son is now a tug master in Brisbane.He did a trip with me on an ANL ship when he was a cadet!! Small word.

Jim Quinn (Orestes)

Jim,

This is a coincidence. I was EDH on the 'Antenor' (12.57- 03.58) and McDavid was Master. Paddy Proctor was Bosun. Also coasted with Bold ( shared this nick name with Wilks) on Ajax. Up for Second Mates (FG) in 61 Liverpool.
Bill

jazz606
4th October 2007, 11:01
I'm not ex Blue Funnel but recently "read" (on a talking book whilst driving) "Voyage East" by Richard Woodman. As an ex seaman I'd say it's pretty authentic. It's a "faction" type account of a trip on a notional Blue Flue called Antigone - well worth reading or listening to. Apologies if this has been mentioned before.

Peggy747
4th October 2007, 12:12
I' ll have to dig out the Discharge book as I went 'around the land' in that ship. Did you ever sail with Bosun Jack Cleary?

Yes Bill,
I am pretty sure Jack Cleary was Bosun of "Antenor" when I sailed in her in1960, the Lamptrimmer was ???? Battersby a great fellow probably from N Ireland.

Bill Davies
4th October 2007, 12:50
I'm not ex Blue Funnel but recently "read" (on a talking book whilst driving) "Voyage East" by Richard Woodman. As an ex seaman I'd say it's pretty authentic. It's a "faction" type account of a trip on a notional Blue Flue called Antigone - well worth reading or listening to. Apologies if this has been mentioned before.

Jazz,
I remember Richard well. Also remember the incident related on an 'Adje boats' (Clytoneus class with wooden sheathed well decks) when a couple of the crowd put caustic soda over several steers which were loaded in Djibouti for Suez. They were arrested on arrival Gladstone.
Also, his ficticious name 'Antigone' was a play on several similarly named ships 'Antilochus' etc.
It was a common experession in those days when referring to individuals who you had sailed with but could not recall the ships name the refer to it as 'Agateucer' China boat men will know what I mean.

Bill Davies
4th October 2007, 12:59
Yes Bill,
I am pretty sure Jack Cleary was Bosun of "Antenor" when I sailed in her in1960, the Lamptrimmer was ???? Battersby a great fellow probably from N Ireland.

That sounds about right. Angus Cummings (Eriskay)was probably the Lamptrimmer. I coasted with Jack around that time. A big Wicklow man and fine sailor.

Bill

Bill Davies
4th October 2007, 13:14
Thanks for the kind words, Jim!

I am trying to remember the story about Sid Bainbridge - I might have to resort to the Old Fella (Again!). I am positive that there is a good yarn to be told!

Regards,

Dave

I seem to remember 'Big Sid Bainbridge' had a son who was an apprentice shipwright and would have eventually ended up a Carpenter in the mid 60s.

Bill

Bill Davies
4th October 2007, 13:16
Yes Bill,
I am pretty sure Jack Cleary was Bosun of "Antenor" when I sailed in her in1960, the Lamptrimmer was ???? Battersby a great fellow probably from N Ireland.

MICK Battersby

Tai Pan
4th October 2007, 15:19
excellent book. i think the one voyage was made up from many. I recall one incident ref the lifeboat going aground in Bohihan. love the reply from the junior eng ref the nackered petrol engine. sums it up to a tee.

Bill Davies
4th October 2007, 16:22
John,
I quite agree. Richard did what we all talk about and that is write a book about it.

Brgds

Bill D

makko
4th October 2007, 17:45
Memory is a strange thing!....I've just remembered a Chief Officer, known as "Mufti" or the "Caliph of Jerusalem"!

I have never read Richard Woodman's book, but I can imagine the lifeboat incident.

One Eng. that I sailed with was known for a time as "Sludge Bowl". I believe that it was on the Helenus, after conversion to a car carrier. In the words of many, that vessel was thoroughly "knackered"! Anyway, during his watch, the main separator alarm went off. He duly answered it and set off to the Sep. room to see what was wrong. As he opened the door, he realized that he could see the sea and in his befuddled head, it dawned on him that there didn't used to be a window in the Sep. room! Apparently, the shaft had sheared and the bowl had been launched like a discus, out of the casing, through the hull and over the wall! The chief, obviously, was none too pleased to receive the call and spares request!

That one engineer was a bit of a "Jonah"! I sailed several times with him on different vessels and there was never a dull moment!

Regards,

Dave

Derek Roger
4th October 2007, 23:50
Well Dave,
Your father has only 3 years on me.
Dalgleish I recall the name.
Other Odyssey names for your father:
Peaston (Drawing Office)
Bob Farquar (Engineers stores)
Duggie Jardine (Boat Shed)
Jack Ratchford (Marine Stores)

Dalgleish was the terror of all appentices in Blue Flu . I think I am correct in saying he was from Dundee.

Bill Davies
5th October 2007, 08:37
Derek,
I can well imagine him being difficult as how else did a man from a different department stay in the mind of a AB some 50 odd years ago. The only interface I had with Odyssey works was as part of the training (post Aberdovey) when we had to work in the Marine Stores ( splicing 'flemish eyes' into runners until we could do it in our sleep) and also in the Boat Shed ( making cargo nets and similar)
Seem to recall he was living in nearby Wallasey at the time.

Tai Pan
5th October 2007, 12:59
on bringing lifeboat back alonside (rowed) jnr eng with greasey hands and blood coming from all knuckles shouts up " the f....ing f.....er is f...ed."

Bill Davies
6th October 2007, 12:00
All above,
As mentioned in previous thread I was EDH with McDavid in 12/57 - 03/58 on the 'Antenor' and there was a story that on arrival Port Said (outward) the canal Pilot greeted him with ' Well somebody has been catching the sun whilst on leave' . McDavid almost physically attacked him as he was always aware of comments ever since the 'Cocoa' incident at Holt's Wharf.
Met Hughie Davies (Mate) in 66 and he said that McDavid bought a property in Southern Spain for retirement and use to bring the 'Peleus' in very close so that the passengers could view his home. What is close on a BF boat is debatable.

Bill Davies
14th October 2007, 01:48
Any of you sailed with 'Scar Face Sanderson' (Master)?????
He was on the 'P' Class in the late 50s and thus very senior.

Bill Davies
14th October 2007, 14:42
To what am I referring:
Two round turns below the lip three above followed by two cross turns????????

randcmackenzie
14th October 2007, 15:53
To what am I referring:
Two round turns below the lip three above followed by two cross turns????????


Making up a wire on the bitts, usually finished off with a whammy on the crosses.

Bill Davies
14th October 2007, 16:08
A Mars Bar is in the Post

Bill Davies
21st October 2007, 11:14
Richard Woodman in his book 'Voyage East' refers to an incident where two or three of the 'crowd' applied caustic soda to steers being taken Djiboutie to Suez.
Anyone remember the name of the ship?????

cheddarnibbles
22nd October 2007, 14:43
Richard Woodman in his book 'Voyage East' refers to an incident where two or three of the 'crowd' applied caustic soda to steers being taken Djiboutie to Suez.
Anyone remember the name of the ship?????

That doesn't surprise me. On Radnorshire in 1961, after spending many hundreds of man-hours on chipping and scraping the four well decks, the chief officer ordered the final coats of black paint to be applied on passage from Penang to Suez. Only to be told, at the last minute, to call into Djibouti and load 200 head of live cattle for Suez. He was devastated. The beasts,however,put a very fine polish on the bare metal once they had scraped all the paint off and the Marine Super. in London was very impressed.

Incidentally,the two Ethiopian cattle men stuck a hose down each beasts's throat and filled them up with fresh water once we reached Suez Roads,in order to get a better price. Or could it be the Egyptian army was partial to boiled silverside. !!

Bill Davies
22nd October 2007, 15:02
That doesn't surprise me. On Radnorshire in 1961, after spending many hundreds of man-hours on chipping and scraping the four well decks, the chief officer ordered the final coats of black paint to be applied on passage from Penang to Suez. Only to be told, at the last minute, to call into Djibouti and load 200 head of live cattle for Suez. He was devastated. The beasts,however,put a very fine polish on the bare metal once they had scraped all the paint off and the Marine Super. in London was very impressed.

Incidentally,the two Ethiopian cattle men stuck a hose down each beasts's throat and filled them up with fresh water once we reached Suez Roads,in order to get a better price. Or could it be the Egyptian army was partial to boiled silverside. !!

Cheddarnibbles,
That is interesting as it was normally the 'Adji boats' with the wood sheathed well decks that were used for cattle transport from Djibouti/Suez. The Bosuns always looked forward to receiving the cattle as in addition to the Bonus they received the Urine and dung from the cattle cleaned the decks like nothing else.

Trader
22nd October 2007, 16:32
I' ll have to dig out the Discharge book as I went 'around the land' in that ship. Did you ever sail with Bosun Jack Cleary?

Hi Bill,

I sailed with "Big Jake" on the "Astynax" in 1954/55 I did a couple of Far East trips and also coasted her. He was quite a character and a fine seaman. I have got a photo of him flaked out on No. 4 hatch somewhere, I shall have to dig it out. The Lampy was a big "Newfie", Bob Parsons, another fine seaman. I am trying to remember the name of another bosun from Wicklow who was a good mate of Jack, if they ever met up in Singapore.....watch out!!!

I also sailed with Capt. MacDavid on the "Bellerophon" in 54. I also remember all the other names that have been mentioned, Bangor Bull, the Ghoul etc. but never sailed with them.

I have just remembered the name of Jacks mate, I am sure it was Kavanagh.

All the best,

Alec.

Bill Davies
22nd October 2007, 21:48
Hi Bill,

I sailed with "Big Jake" on the "Astynax" in 1954/55 I did a couple of Far East trips and also coasted her. He was quite a character and a fine seaman. I have got a photo of him flaked out on No. 4 hatch somewhere, I shall have to dig it out. The Lampy was a big "Newfie", Bob Parsons, another fine seaman. I am trying to remember the name of another bosun from Wicklow who was a good mate of Jack, if they ever met up in Singapore.....watch out!!!

I also sailed with Capt. MacDavid on the "Bellerophon" in 54. I also remember all the other names that have been mentioned, Bangor Bull, the Ghoul etc. but never sailed with them.

I have just remembered the name of Jacks mate, I am sure it was Kavanagh.

All the best,

Alec.

Alec,

You have a good memory we must of crossed paths somewhere.Joe Kavanagh was from Wicklow as was Jack Cleary.
You might also remember the senior Bosun Paddy Proctor and his cousin Lampy Danny Proctor both from Arklow. I sailed with Paddy on my first trip Memnon (11months) Laxton was the Master. I also sailed with Paddy when I was EDH on Antenor 58 when McDavid was Master. Recall that Paddy was Bosun of the 'Peleus' (with McDavid) 61 through 66.

Trevorw
22nd October 2007, 22:44
Alec,

You have a good memory we must of crossed paths somewhere.Joe Kavanagh was from Wicklow as was Jack Cleary.
You might also remember the senior Bosun Paddy Proctor and his cousin Lampy Danny Proctor both from Arklow. I sailed with Paddy on my first trip Memnon (11months) Laxton was the Master. I also sailed with Paddy when I was EDH on Antenor 58 when McDavid was Master. Recall that Paddy was Bosun of the 'Peleus' (with McDavid) 61 through 66.

Did three trips with Laxton on "Demodocus", 61/62 - a great guy and a good laugh!

Trader
23rd October 2007, 18:12
Alec,

You have a good memory we must of crossed paths somewhere.Joe Kavanagh was from Wicklow as was Jack Cleary.
You might also remember the senior Bosun Paddy Proctor and his cousin Lampy Danny Proctor both from Arklow. I sailed with Paddy on my first trip Memnon (11months) Laxton was the Master. I also sailed with Paddy when I was EDH on Antenor 58 when McDavid was Master. Recall that Paddy was Bosun of the 'Peleus' (with McDavid) 61 through 66.

Hi Bill,

I never sailed with Paddy Proctor but I sailed with Danny Proctor, his cousin, when he was Lampy on the "Neleus" on the Aussie run in 1956. Our bosun had a nervous breakdown and had to step down and Danny took over as bosun. I think that Danny preferred the Lampys' job though.

I don't know if our paths crossed or not. I joined the "Bellerophon" in 1952 straight from Aberdovey and spent 2 years there doing 6 Far East trips apart from coasting. I then joined the "Astynax" for a couple of trips, coasted the "Ixion", "Nestor" then joined the "Neleus" for a couple of Aussie trips before paying off in 1956 and joining Manchester Liners.(Manchester was my home town).

Alec.

Bill Davies
23rd October 2007, 20:09
Alec,
I left 'Memnon' in 07/56 (JOS)and followed up with 'Alcinous', 'Cyclops', 'Clytoneous', 'Ascanious', Adrastus, 'Antenor' 'Ajax', 'Aeneas', Perseus' & 'Peleus' all chronological from 08/55 through 04/61 when I went up for Second Mates (FG).
I have not included in above thevessels that I went around the land in.

Brgds

Bill Davies

demodocus
25th October 2007, 01:02
any of you BF chaps ever hear or sail with Gordon Vickery. He was a cadet starting 1958.

Did 2 voyages with him in Diomed 1961. Haven't heard of him since.

Bill Davies
25th October 2007, 18:54
Around the time I was up for Second Mates (FG) 09/61 there was another BF AB from Wicklow around my age who was just commencing studying for Second Mates (FG) called John Barlow. On passing understand he stayed with BF. Anyone remember him????? Where is he now????

price
26th October 2007, 15:11
I sailed with Joe Barlow on one of the A Boats in 1956, any relation?. Joe was from either Wicklow or Arklow I forget now. he became a NUS rep.

I met Joe again some years later, the late 1970s, when I was a marine supervisor at Pembroke Refinery, one of Ludvigs' tankers the 'Universe Sentinel' laid alongside no.1 berth for a week or more under arrest, I think Joe was probably representing the ITF in the dispute.

You mentioned Theo Jones in one of your previous postings, I sailed with Theo on one of the A Boats around the land in the mid 1950s, an unforgettable character and good shipmate. He was Lamps on this particular vessel.
Bruce.

Bill Davies
26th October 2007, 16:30
Bruce,
The John Barlow I am referring to was from Wicklow. I am horrified to think that he got involved with Unions especially the ITF. He was such a decent man. I know all about the 'Sentinel' as I too worked for D.K. Ludwig for many years.
Theo (Ale House) Jones like his good friend Hughie Davies were both from Chwillog and 'off deck' . They were both Ch.Offs when I was Deck Boy in 55 so your Theo is not the one.

Bill

price
26th October 2007, 18:05
Bill,
It was Joe Barlow who I knew, probably not your friend John, I just thought that there may be some connection.

Bruce.

Bill Davies
26th October 2007, 20:11
Bill,
It was Joe Barlow who I knew, probably not your friend John, I just thought that there may be some connection.

Bruce.

Bruce,

Thank god for that. A BF man consorting with the ITF. Unthinkable!!
However, you do have me thinking about Theo Jones the Lampy and I may have gone 'around the land ' with him.

Brgds

Bill

price
26th October 2007, 22:56
Hello Bill,
It was all a long time ago, Joe may have been with the NUS at the time I forget now, my apologies.

I remember rumours that Theo either had passed his 2nd. mates or was going to sit for his ticket at the time.

I remember a lot of men from Pen Llyn in BF, but not to my knowledge from Chwilog.

Cheers Bruce.

Bill Davies
26th October 2007, 23:28
Hello Bill,
It was all a long time ago, Joe may have been with the NUS at the time I forget now, my apologies.

I remember rumours that Theo either had passed his 2nd. mates or was going to sit for his ticket at the time.

I remember a lot of men from Pen Llyn in BF, but not to my knowledge from Chwilog.

Cheers Bruce.

Bruce,

That is very true. To my knowledge only Hughie Davies (passed away earlier this year) and Theo (Ale House )Jones (passed away some years ago) were both from Chwilog. Both got their commands around 67/68 which would put them around 48. Easy to figure when eligable for Second Mates (FG).
Interesting I sailed with one AB in the BF (Al White) that held First Mates (FG).....long story.

Brgds

Bill

KENNEEDHAM
7th November 2007, 21:57
I was with Angus in Japan, I think it was 1980 on a Barber boat very nice guy

KENNEEDHAM
7th November 2007, 22:09
I sailed with captain bold and ( I think his wife) in 68 but I will have to dig my old discharge book out and check

Bill Davies
7th November 2007, 22:18
I was with Angus in Japan, I think it was 1980 on a Barber boat very nice guy

Bosun Angus Cummings was a thoroughly nice guy (no bad language in front of Angus), excellent seaman. Understand he is now happily married in his retirement and still living in Eriskay. Angus who is now 80 used to keep us all spellbound about the grounding of the 'Politician' in 42 (Whisky Galore)

Orestes
11th November 2007, 00:08
Bill,
sorry that I have not replied sooner, but have been away.The bosun on the Antenor when I was there was "Wammy" Joe Reynolds. The only other name that sticks from the Antenor days was Much, or Mutch. There were two brothers, one was abig guy, well built, and the other a short guy with a fantastic sense of humour.

Jim Quinn

Bill Davies
11th November 2007, 16:46
John,

Joe (Lofty) Reynolds and Dave Mutch sailed with them both 'around the land'. Dave was an exceptionally good guitarist. Memories of Buddy Holly songs. Both fine seamen. Two brothers????You have me thinking

Bill

Ian Stanley
16th November 2007, 13:54
Dave,
I remember Dalgleish well. I was a cadet engineer from '68 to '72 while he was at Birkenhead

KENNEEDHAM
16th November 2007, 21:46
Alec,

You have a good memory we must of crossed paths somewhere.Joe Kavanagh was from Wicklow as was Jack Cleary.
You might also remember the senior Bosun Paddy Proctor and his cousin Lampy Danny Proctor both from Arklow. I sailed with Paddy on my first trip Memnon (11months) Laxton was the Master. I also sailed with Paddy when I was EDH on Antenor 58 when McDavid was Master. Recall that Paddy was Bosun of the 'Peleus' (with McDavid) 61 through 66.

I sailed with Joe Kavanagh (if its the same guy) when he was bosun in 1966 on Ixion when I was first trip stewards boy.happy times

tony poutch
16th November 2007, 22:49
I sailed with Joe Kavanagh (if its the same guy) when he was bosun in 1966 on Ixion when I was first trip stewards boy.happy times
hi ken I WAS WITH YOU ON iIxion in 66 I WAS DECK BOY PADDY MOODY AB JOE KAVANAGH BOSUN ALL WICKLOW.I ALSO REMEMBER WAGGA THE LAUNDRY WHO USED TO THREATEN US WITH HIS KEYS(Jester)

rebbel
16th November 2007, 23:10
Does any one remember Glyn Jones from Nefyn North Wales who sailed on the Antilocus in the late 60s early 70s

Trader
17th November 2007, 17:49
Does any one remember Glyn Jones from Nefyn North Wales who sailed on the Antilocus in the late 60s early 70s

I sailed with a Glyn Jones, 2nd. Cook on the Bellerophon during 1952/54. Can't remember where he was from though. I should think that it is quite a common name in N. Wales.

Trader

Bill Davies
17th November 2007, 18:08
Trader,
Like you I sailed with dozens of men from Nefyn and mostly with the name Jones.
I think the Glyn Jones that 'rebbel' refers to is after our time and mentioned in the Blue Funnel Association newsletter. Deck Boy to AB 1961-71

Bill Davies
17th November 2007, 18:12
Trader,
Did you ever sail with an AB by the name Jimmy Moran (Wallasey) involved in a fatal road accident in Rotterdam.

Bill

Bill Davies
17th November 2007, 20:35
KenNeedham,

I just thought of the names of a few Catering staff from the BF. They were both Wallasey Ch.Cooks. Tommy Fleetwood and Alf Brierly and a BR Stwd Joe Maloney. Any Bells.

Bill Davies
18th November 2007, 18:40
BOY PADDY MOODY AB J

Now thats a name I remember, would he be about 5 feet tall (MAX)?????

tony poutch
18th November 2007, 19:09
Now thats a name I remember, would he be about 5 feet tall (MAX)?????

YES BILL that was Paddy 5ft in his boots sadly he passed away some years back while still a young man

Bill Davies
18th November 2007, 20:52
YES BILL that was Paddy 5ft in his boots sadly he passed away some years back while still a young man

Sorry to hear that. A very nice man. Never a bad word for anyone and always cheerfull. We were ABs together on an 'A' boat 59.

tony poutch
18th November 2007, 21:16
Sorry to hear that. A very nice man. Never a bad word for anyone and always cheerfull. We were ABs together on an 'A' boat 59.

I sailed with Paddy again on the Diomed when he was Lampy i did 5 trips on her i can never remember the Bosuns name he was a tall thin Yorkshire man nicknamed Mick the Bull a fair who descent type

Bill Davies
19th November 2007, 08:06
Tony,
Can't remember a Bosun who fits that description. Recall 'Bangor Bull'.
However, many fine seamen from Wicklow town many you have mentioned.
The present Harbour Master, John Barlow was just starting Second Mates (FG) when I had completed.

Brgds

Bill

tony poutch
19th November 2007, 11:54
Tony,
Can't remember a Bosun who fits that description. Recall 'Bangor Bull'.
However, many fine seamen from Wicklow town many you have mentioned.
The present Harbour Master, John Barlow was just starting Second Mates (FG) when I had completed.

Brgds

Bill

ANOTHER AB who we lost some years ago KEVIN SEALY he spent all his time with BFhad a brother JOE who sang in CARNEGIE HALL

Bill Davies
19th November 2007, 18:10
ANOTHER AB who we lost some years ago KEVIN SEALY he spent all his time with BFhad a brother JOE who sang in CARNEGIE HALL

Tony,

The name certainlay rings a bell.


Brgds

Bill

KENNEEDHAM
21st November 2007, 21:23
Dalgleish was the terror of all appentices in Blue Flu . I think I am correct in saying he was from Dundee.

can anyone remenber my father Fred Needham he was male nurse in Odyssey works from mid, 60,s for about 8 years?
Ken Needham

Bill Davies
29th November 2007, 22:56
Frisco Rig or Yo Yo Gear.

Was the former name a BF thing as I always heard the rig referred to as YoYo elsewhere

randcmackenzie
30th November 2007, 00:12
Frisco Rig or Yo Yo Gear.

Was the former name a BF thing as I always heard the rig referred to as YoYo elsewhere

I take it you are talking about passing the two yard arm and two midship runners through a block and shackling them together.

In effect four winches on 1 hook and doubling the union purchase load.

Widely known as Frisco gear on the US West coast in the late 60's.

Best regards.

Bill Davies
4th December 2007, 18:45
Randcmackenzie,

Apologies for not responding sooner.

Spot on!! Forever using this rig around the Far East. Recall an incident in Jesselton in the late 50s ('Antenor' I think) where two of the crowd on derrick watch were ordered to rig a Frisco at No.3 and the AB (probably with a drink in him) and JOS rigged the 'mid and yard' fore and aft together. A real YoYo (in the proper sense)and the poor soul never lived it down for the rest of the trip.

Brgds

Bill

Bill Davies
17th December 2007, 10:37
Seem to recall the practice of removing the pin feather on the '10 ton gear' (stowed in No.5 store) was not emulated in any of the eight British Flag tramp compannies I sailed in following BF . Another BF practice unique to that company??? Could never see the benefit but others would argue. Did the practice have its roots in some incident??

Trevorw
17th December 2007, 20:21
Doea anyone remember Tommy Morris? He was an AB on "Demodocus" - fell from the foremast in the Red Sea and sustained fatal injuries. What an absolute pearl of a bloke he was!

Bill Davies
17th December 2007, 20:24
Knew him well. Brother to Jimmy, Bosun who trained the Deck Boys 'around the land' prior to them going deep sea. Excellent seaman as would be expected.

Bill Davies
18th December 2007, 08:20
Doea anyone remember Tommy Morris? He was an AB on "Demodocus" - fell from the foremast in the Red Sea and sustained fatal injuries. What an absolute pearl of a bloke he was!

Can you remember the year this incident happened as I am sure it was around 62. I am fairly sure I had already left the BF.

Brgds

Bill

Trevorw
18th December 2007, 15:19
Can you remember the year this incident happened as I am sure it was around 62. I am fairly sure I had already left the BF.

Brgds

Bill

I'm almost certain it was June 1962.

Bill Davies
18th December 2007, 15:44
I'm almost certain it was June 1962.

Thanks for that Trevor. I thought it was 62.

Brgds

Bill

marc miles-thomas
20th December 2007, 15:02
Any of you sailed with 'Scar Face Sanderson' (Master)?????
He was on the 'P' Class in the late 50s and thus very senior.

Bill I believe that 'Scar Face Sanderson' was my great uncle. I went aboard Glenfinlas (ex Calcheus) in London docks in around 61 and then Cardiganshire around the same time. He was Master both times - I was only small but the experience stayed with me and I went on to join Shaw Savill later on.
I would be fascinated if you or anyone else has any memories of him. He died in the late sixties by the way - too much Johnnie Walker!

Bill Davies
20th December 2007, 15:15
Marc,
My pleasure to speak with you. Capt Sanderson was a much respected Master and I will check my Dicharge book to identify exactly which ships I sailed with him in.
From memory I think he was in the 'Peleus' and relieved by 'Black Mac' McDavid in 61 ( I left that year).
He was strict (two beers a day) but fair and would always make time to talk to 'the crowd'

Brgds

Bill

Bill Davies
20th December 2007, 18:09
Marc,

The ship was 'Antenor' 1958. I was a first trip AB and proud to have sailed with your uncle. Try typing 'Antenor' into the cargo section of gallery and you will see one of the finest photographs in the collection.

Brgds

Bill Davies

demodocus
20th December 2007, 20:54
'Scar Face Sanderson' was my great uncle.
I would be fascinated if you or anyone else has any memories of him. He died in the late sixties by the way - too much Johnnie Walker!

I had the pleasure of one voyage with "Scarface" in Antenor as a Middy 61/62. The other Middies were Ralph Elliott & Richard Woodman (Voyage East fame) and Engr Cadets Laffey and Vic Rate.

Can you tell me what affliction it was that made his face peel so prolifically?

Bill Davies
21st December 2007, 11:20
Does anyone remember the name of Ronnie Johnston who was in charge of the Sail Loft in Odyssey works. On arriving ex Aberdovey in March 55 spent time with the 'old hands' for several weeks before entering the Marine Stores under Jack Ratchford ( with the trilby) putting 'flemish eyes' in runners for the next couple of weeks. Still no guarantee you would be excepted unless your reports from these two gentlemen agreed and Capt Ronnie Symons gave the final stamp of approval

johnkathmartin
21st December 2007, 14:31
I had the pleasure of one voyage with "Scarface" in Antenor as a Middy 61/62. The other Middies were Ralph Elliott & Richard Woodman (Voyage East fame) and Engr Cadets Laffey and Vic Rate.

Can you tell me what affliction it was that made his face peel so prolifically?

I did hear it was caused by exposure to anthrax spores at some point in his career.
Did you know he had a son, name of Harry, who sailed with BF, up to at least the rank of 2nd Off. ?
After he retired, I had the pleasure of looking after Capt. Sanderson and family during two or three annual family holidays that he took at a hotel my wife's family used to own. Despite his sometimes fearsome reputation at sea, he was a perfect gentleman on retiral. That would have been mis seventies I think.

regards,

jhm

Bill Davies
22nd December 2007, 22:45
JHM,

Angus Cummings, Eriskay was Lampy on the 'Antenor' with Capt Sanderson. Did you know Angus?

Brgds

Bill

johnkathmartin
10th January 2008, 13:50
Bill.
Sorry for delay in replying - have been at sea.
I only 'coasted' the Antenor as a middie, and dont really remember anyone apart from the fact Capt. Jepp and family made the trip with us, along with a memory of the other middies who did the coasting trip. The rest might have passed in a fog of 'Zillertal' induced lager fumes !!

regards,


JHM

Bill Davies
13th January 2008, 11:02
JHM,

That is to be expected as it was a long time ago. What were your dates for 'Antenor'???

Bill

johnkathmartin
15th January 2008, 14:53
JHM,

That is to be expected as it was a long time ago. What were your dates for 'Antenor'???

Bill
Hi Bill.
I think it would have been winter - Feb. March perhaps, of 1962.
I recall that one of the middies with me was Peter Barlow-Morris, another was Richard Woodman - The Skipper was Capt. Sanderson - as I said the marine super ( and family, including his daughters) Capt. Jepp came round the coast with us.
JHM

Bill Davies
15th January 2008, 16:47
JHM,

Many thanks yours.
I remember Capt Gepp well. On another post quite recently I mentioned someone who told me on passing Second Mates (FG) in 61 that ' should I keep my nose clean I would have command when I was 50'

Capt Gepp was that someone.

Best regards

Bill

DICK SLOAN
16th January 2008, 22:19
Bill did you ever get your masters ticket...

Bill Davies
16th January 2008, 22:30
For a man who gives absolutely nothing away on your profile I have to assume you are a ship enthusiast. Who else refers to a Master's (FG) as a 'Ticket'
What I received in Liverpool in 1967 was a Master (FG) Certificate.

Any other questions?????

K urgess
16th January 2008, 22:34
Everybody refers to every type of "certificate" as a ticket.
If you've never heard it before you must've been living on Mars.

makko
16th January 2008, 22:48
Bill,
I also have C's oC, STCW '95.....but they are all "tickets"! I suppose that it is only deckside tickets that are "FG" as engineers are "Unlimited", referring to M/E power output.

Rgds.
Dave

BeerSailor
16th January 2008, 22:55
This is all wonderfully predictable! Keep it going!
Bill, I have seen through you now and realise that you are just winding up some members with your obviously tongue in cheek
comments!
I must admit that I never heard anyone use the term 'certificate'. I did hear frequent references to tickets and even 'Skipper's Ticket'.
Mind you that was NZSCo for you!
regards

sparkie2182
16th January 2008, 23:07
some of our fellow members hold the postmaster general marine radio telecommunications certificate class 1 .... or class 2 or both.

also the department of trade and industry radar maintenance certificate

also the city and guilds of london institute full technical certificate in marine communications and electronics.

we just call it them "tickets".........cos life is too short.........:)


our marine engineering friends will doubtless have their equivalent "long winded" qualification titles.

i think they also traditionally refer to them as "tickets" for the same reason

Peter4447
17th January 2008, 07:53
Although just slightly off thread it's wonderful how these posts jog the memory!
When I was with GF (Grey Funnel) the word 'chit' was in everyday use and understood by all ranks and rates from Admirals down just like the word ticket. I have no idea what the proper terminology was but amongst many examples you could have a Bar Chit, a Beer Chit, a Draft Chit, a Slop Chit etc.
As Sparkie says we just called them chits because life is too short...only problem is I still find myself using the word on occasion today!(Jester)
Peter4447

makko
17th January 2008, 14:49
Yes Peter! Bar Chits!

I remember that someone onboard had one of the first (self-build) PCs. In those days, you had to "program" the computer, very few off the shelf softwares. In spare time, we developed a system for the bar bills and also a rudimentary spares system! How things have changed! LoL!

Rgds.
Dave

K urgess
17th January 2008, 15:29
Noon chitties, bar chits, I'm sure there were more.
I think the Merch inherited the word from GF but stand to be corrected.
Can also mean brownie point or a saucy girl or young woman.[=P]
From the Hindi (Mahrati) word "chitthi"

Peter4447
17th January 2008, 15:57
From the Hindi (Mahrati) word "chitthi"

Not a lotta people know that - I didn't!
Peter(Jester)

AncientBrit
17th January 2008, 17:36
I should imagine that there are a whole raft of GF types shaking their heads over this thread and wondering when all is said and done.
Who really gives a chit?
As my grandfather once said to me..
Treat all man as your equal till they demonstrate otherwise and never forget that the only person who can really make you feel inferior is yourself. (or if you are Brit MN, Blue Funnel![=P] )
AB

oceangoer
18th January 2008, 04:58
I think it’s time to set some of this rubbish to one side.

I joined Bluies as 3rd Mate simply because I was in the right place at the right time with a Mates ticket. I needed a job, they needed a 3rd Mate fast. The clerk who processed me after my acceptance by the Powers of the Holy Temple of India Buildings (remember the Temple Bar in Dale Street next to the Iron Door for after 1500 drinks?) made sure that I knew just how lucky I was. “Not often that an outsider gets in, try and keep your nose clean.” he told me.

Mind you, I was pleased too. Getting into BlueFlu after I’d been on the “dark side”, Ellermans and Lamport & Holt, was good going.

I was there from 63 – 65 getting in sea time for my Masters ticket.

Were they any good ??

Retrospectively, in comparison with Ellermans, L&H, Bank Line ( the only companies I can compare them with) they were streets ahead in cargo supervision, handling, and stowage. I learned more about the handling of “strange” cargoes here than anywhere else. At sea, hold ventilation adjusted at least twice a day. Never saw a rat in BluFlu, over-run by them in L&H.

Ship and maintainance, never seen anything like it before or since. Built like brick sh*thouses”. Painted from truck to w/l every voyage, cargo gear dropped and overhauled every outbound passage from UK, shackle numbers noted, compared with the record book re SWL etc. Same with lifeboats and fire extinguishers (3rd Mate).

NO truth whatsoever in the tale that the boot topping is painted especially to coincide with expected loading to make ‘em look full. They were full.

NO truth in the inked “company” routes furphy. Every voyage the charts were sent ashore in Liverpool for correction and (often) a different set returned. The run across the Med, down the Red Sea, and across the Indian were tramlines of what they’d found from years of experience to be the best routes having regard for the weather.

Flags in port. On the UK coast it depended if we had Middies or not. If there were Middies then flags went up in unison at 0800 and down at sunset. If not then when the gangwayman got around to it. Overseas it was a ritual, 0800 & Sunset, 4th Mates responsibility, Middies work.

Operationally (cf my other companies), Blue Funnel were tops. If I were a cargo shipper in the 60’s I put ‘em top of my list every time.

However, in terms of working aboard there is a difference.

In Bluies I served with some of the nastiest people I’ve ever met.

As an “outsider” nobody socialised with me for my first voyage. The Master (SS Howie) told me in front of the wheelman to behave myself and I might get another trip with Blue Funnel. The Mate (Railton) didn’t speak to me before Port Said. The 2nd Mate (Spud Murphy) took it on himself to “pick on” a particular Glasgow Middy he didn’t like. It went on all voyage until Ginger laid him out and got fired. On a later voyages I saw a Choff called Timbrell have the Middies scrape the wooden wheelhouse down to bare wood 3 times. What an education!!!!

Acceptance of new technology …… was pathetic. The radar (a Kelvin Hughes Mark Zero) was treated as an instrument of the devil. I spent hours plotting NA’s and TNA’s and making recommendations only to be told to shut up by Punchard. Then came the Arkas Autopilot. Blue Funnel trusted it to the extent that it ran during the day and we had a wheelman after dark.

You see, the whole thing is about kudos.

Having left BluFlu thanks to an argument about sitting for my Masters ticket (I took six weeks and they said I’d taken too long and missed my ship) I went elsewhere and found a gentler but almost as efficient way of life in Bank Line I wandered on my weary way.

Bill Davies
18th January 2008, 10:09
Bill,
I also have C's oC, STCW '95.....but they are all "tickets"! I suppose that it is only deckside tickets that are "FG" as engineers are "Unlimited", referring to M/E power output.

Rgds.
Dave

ST//?? two/one or two all. Are we talking football or what.

Master (FG) Certificate ceased in 78. The successor is a very poor relative.

Would be interesting to hear how BF in their death throws catered for the 'dumming down' in Certificate standards subsequent to 78.


Brgds

Bill

tacho
18th January 2008, 10:47
The Master (SS Howie) told me in front of the wheelman to behave myself and I might get another trip with Blue Funnel.

If he'd done that to me I would have told him that he could bet on it.

R651400
18th January 2008, 10:48
Acceptance of new technology …… was pathetic. The radar (a Kelvin Hughes Mark Zero) was treated as an instrument of the devil. I spent hours plotting NA’s and TNA’s and making recommendations only to be told to shut up by Punchard. Then came the Arkas Autopilot. Blue Funnel trusted it to the extent that it ran during the day and we had a wheelman after dark.

Excellent input oceangoer... I think it should also be cc to thread "Blue Funnel Reborn."
I personally found BF's theology with radar the same as radio, a BOT requirement but an unnecessary appendage.
My conclusions are drawn from three golden oldies I sailed with Melampus/GMBZ 1923, Ajax/GJXM 1931 and Orestes/GFPQ 1926.
Compared with Liberty Glenbeg/GDJV ex Samjack and what little they did to satisfy BOT radio regulations, the above were super-tech....

Santos
18th January 2008, 12:15
Never saw a rat in BluFlu, over-run by them in L&H.

Have to agree with that L+H tended to let the rat population grow a bit before having the ships fumigated. ( I know, met quite a few in the bilges and was visited on the bridge on one occassion by one, which I managed to knock over the side with a broom )

However definitely prefereable sailing with them to arrogant, ignorant nasty people who considered everyone inferior to them.

One thing I can say about L+H 99.9 % were great shipmates and that covers ALL the crew officers and everyone else.

Chris.

K urgess
18th January 2008, 12:19
Nicely balanced, Oceangoer.
Plus and minus the same as all the other shipping companies.
I sailed with your other three mentioned companies and found two of them thoroughly enjoyable. The third, Ellerman's I didn't go deep sea with but found them a little heavy on BS and "belonging". They also seemed to be a bit backward with the technology. Two weeks though is not really long enough for an in depth analysis.
As Chris says L+H were great to sail with.
If I had to join a shipping company permanently it would definitely have been Bankline.[=P]

R651400
18th January 2008, 15:58
Never saw a rat in BluFlu, over-run by them in L&H.

Anyone who has sailed with BF's permanent Far Easters may not have sighted a rat or cockroach on board but know the joys of a fumigation night ashore in Connell House or whatever kampong and it's delights the subby took you!

Alan Rae
18th January 2008, 19:13
Did my first deep sea trip on the Memnon,1965/6.It was an eye opening experience-talk about oil and water!The only deck officer who would pass the time of day with us lowly engine drivers was the fourth mate.Ther was absolutely NO interdepartmental socialising and this even extended to the working area.When they had finished working cargo at night the only way the junior on watch found out was to go on deck and then he had to find the duty officer to confirm this so he could shut a generator down.Never seen so much B******t before or since.Even got a bollocking off the chief for wearing a dark blue tie(instead of a black one)in the saloon for dinner so that I could catch the bum boat ashore.Socialising with the crew,chinese or Brit was totally verboten.Having said that they were well built,well run ships,although the Chinese engine room crowd seemed to do most of the maintenance.The office couldn't understand it when I jacked after two trips and joined Mobil-what a difference!Alan Rae

BeerSailor
18th January 2008, 20:34
Did my first deep sea trip on the Memnon,1965/6.It was an eye opening experience-talk about oil and water!The only deck officer who would pass the time of day with us lowly engine drivers was the fourth mate.Ther was absolutely NO interdepartmental socialising and this even extended to the working area.When they had finished working cargo at night the only way the junior on watch found out was to go on deck and then he had to find the duty officer to confirm this so he could shut a generator down.Never seen so much B******t before or since.Even got a bollocking off the chief for wearing a dark blue tie(instead of a black one)in the saloon for dinner so that I could catch the bum boat ashore.Socialising with the crew,chinese or Brit was totally verboten.Having said that they were well built,well run ships,although the Chinese engine room crowd seemed to do most of the maintenance.The office couldn't understand it when I jacked after two trips and joined Mobil-what a difference!Alan Rae
Cannot see how this load of cobblers would have worked on the NZ run, it would have ruined our great social life. One wonders what was the thinking behind such a regime and why would anyone think it necessary?

Santos
18th January 2008, 20:49
I have to agree, in L+H we all mixed, deck officers, sparkies, cadets and engineers alike and enjoyed some great times.

The seamen and the greasers, donkeymen and stewards all mixed together as a group, going ashore together and being mates.

Very friendly atmosphere all round and I might add very rarely any trouble whatsoever, only ever remember about five loggings in the eight years I was with them and one of them was at Christmas time and involved too much grog.

Chris.

Phil Saul
19th January 2008, 01:52
The problem with BF was that there was too much bullshit.
I joined the Peleus in '66 the trip after McDavid left her and was told of an incident which had occurred during sailing day inspection on a previous trip.
McDavid was carrying out the inspection of the officers accommodation accompanied by the usual 'bods' and the steward responsible for servicing that section of the accommodation.
McDavid walked into one cabin and tossed his white cap onto the deck (apparently to check whether the deck was clean) and told the steward to pick it up.
Unfortunately, he'd picked on the wrong guy as this steward wasn't a company man but was off the Pool.
The steward told him "pick it up your f*cking self", collected his gear and walked off the ship.
I just wish I could have been there to see the look on McDavids face.
I used to wonder just how guys like that would have got on in Federal or NZSC, the other companies I sailed with as I can't see such behaviour surviving in such laid back companies.
And that type of arrogance is surely self-defeating due to the fact that it results in greater turnover of the crew which translates to greater in-efficiency.
And that was the senior BF master for you !!

Regards Phil (Thumb)

Bill Davies
19th January 2008, 12:01
Oceangoer,
Interesting post made all the more so by your actual experience of BF.
I can sympathize with you regarding the officer attitude as I experienced it myself coming 'up the hawsepipe'. Assistance in my studies was not readily offered although I hasten to add my experience of McDavid in 58 was good. I was very fortunate to sail with two excellent Ch.Offs who did help and they were Hughie Davies(no relation) and Theo (Ale House) Jones (both 'off deck and both from Chwilog).
Again, when up for Second Mates (FG) in Liverpool I was not included in any of the socializing from BF contingent as I was still very much one of 'the crowd' (difficult in that two were in my class in St.Anselm's, Birkenhead, but they went to Conway). I was however, readily accepted by mem from the 'tramps'.
Having never sailed as an officer in the BF and therefore have no experience of that 'rarefied field' suffice to say I was not prepared to sail as 4th Mate with my Certificate. On presenting myself before Fletcher for Master's in 67 I had Ch.Off experience the BF contingent had 3rd Mates experience.
My Officer experience in British Flag was in seven British tramp companies (faster promotion) and I must say the Officer material was as good if not better than what was found in BF. What was different was the standard of the ratings found in these companies. I said in my very first post in this site and I'll say it again, that the standard of the Blue Funnel Bosuns and Sailors was better than I experienced elsewhere in the British flag or the subsequent 36 years FOC. The training in Aberdovey and subsequently Odyssey works was excellent as was the onboard training. This structure was not emulated by any other company in the British flag. They were good, very good.

Bill

makko
19th January 2008, 17:32
Bill,
I think that you have finally cleared up the point that you were trying to make! Yes the Sea School and shoreside time made a big difference!

Rgds.
Dave

oceangoer
20th January 2008, 00:43
I can sympathize with you regarding the officer attitude as I experienced it myself …. when up for Second Mates (FG) in Liverpool I was not included in any of the socializing from BF contingent as I was still very much one of 'the crowd'

It was made very clear to me by Howie and Railton on my first BF voyage that the “crowd” were off social limits to Officers. Fraternisation was frowned on. Engineers were just tolerated.

Setting aside the “we wuz better …no you wuzn’t” nature of many of the posts in this thread I scratched back into my hazy recollections of that time 45 years ago I asked myself how I felt about the company after 3 and a bit years. After those 9 or so deep sea voyages to the Far East there was no doubt in my mind at that time that “Bluies were best” regardless of some of the "personalities" I'd met and I was prepared to worship at the Holt Altar with the goal of Blue Funnel Masterdom being the pot of gold at the end of my rainbow.

I’d never been overtaken by another ship, everywhere you went in Asia there was at least one other Bluie (except places like Bohihan) and sometimes as many as six, the crews came back voyage after voyage, we were generally at or near the front in the Suez canal convoys, we’d go straight alongside in places like Colombo (homeward) whereas others sat outside for days awaiting a berth, we were down to our marks both ways, the food was good and so on. My mind soon accepted that it was worth putting up with some bull to be on what we perceived to be the top of the heap. Whether I liked it or not I’d become a “Holts man”, part of the brotherhood. I suspect that some correspondents to this thread may be wearing those same rose coloured glasses.

Why did I leave this nirvana??

With their connivance I did three deep sea voyages and the three coastals without a break in order to build up enough leave to do Masters without going off pay. They promised me a 2nd Mates job if I passed. I did 5 weeks at the Liverpool school, sat the exams, and then took a week off awaiting results. Passed and went into India Buildings to collect my congratulations and berth only to be told by a clerk that I was expected a week earlier and they no longer had a job for me, end of story. As curt and abrupt as that.

I was a 2nd Mate in Bank Line four hours later and Chief Officer the following voyage. I enjoyed every day of the years I spent in Bank Line although it took some time to work the Blue Funnel “vinegar” out of me.

Given the same circumstances today would I go into Blue Funnel? NO. Life is too short to behave like that. Remember this is the company that passed a Board resolution in 1967 that they knew would result in 1,400 crew redundancies, that's 25 loyal ships crews on the scrap heap.

But all that was 45 years ago and it doesn’t matter a tuppenny damn today. We live and go to sea in a totally different world.

End of subject as far as I'm concerned.

makko
20th January 2008, 00:51
Bravo! Oceangoer!

Rgds.
Dave

K urgess
20th January 2008, 10:19
Well said, Oceangoer.(Applause)

With the sort of attitude that you outline how welcome would GP manning have been in those hallowed halls?
We had difficulty accepting it on easygoing VLCCs.

Bill Davies
20th January 2008, 10:54
Oceangoer,
I think they did you a favour. Too many went back with their Master's for another 4/5 years as Second Mate followed by 10/12 years as Mate only to find Command was not going too happen. The BF dream turned sour. You probably feel you wasted enough time as Third Mate for 4 years.

tacho
20th January 2008, 11:10
Remember this is the company that passed a Board resolution in 1967 that they knew would result in 1,400 crew redundancies, that's 25 loyal ships crews on the scrap heap.

Very good point. The only person you can ever rely on is yourself. Companies will be loyal to their employees for as long as it's convenient.

Phil Saul
21st January 2008, 04:17
I said in my very first post in this site and I'll say it again, that the standard of the Blue Funnel Bosuns and Sailors was better than I experienced elsewhere in the British flag or the subsequent 36 years FOC. The training in Aberdovey and subsequently Odyssey works was excellent as was the onboard training. This structure was not emulated by any other company in the British flag. They were good, very good.

Bill[/QUOTE]


Well Bill, I came across as many 'wasters' and morons on deck in BF, as in the other companies I sailed with. More, probably, as they were mainly Welshmen and Scousers.

Let's face it, deckwork wasn't exactly rocket science now, was it.
I never heard of anyone flunking their EDH or AB's tickets.

On joining the Federal boat , Westmorland, on a double header MANZ run, we all signed on as GP ratings to allow the catering crowd to work on deck in their spare time due to deck crowd being reduced.

The work carried out by the stewards was the usual deck stuff, greasing, soogieing, chipping, painting and getting the cables ready for tying up.
To my everlasting regret they would never let me 'chuck' that piece of string ashore attached to the cable. Reckoned it required a professional!!

We even managed to secure a deck cargo to the complete satisfaction of the Mate and Bosun and all this without having to wear that knife and spike pouch so beloved of deckies.

The ship still managed to maintain schedule, load and discharge cargo efficiently and was as immaculately presented as every other Federal and NZSC ship.

All joking apart, and excluding the catering part timers, the deck crowds in Federal and NZSC were man for man, every bit as good as any deck crowd I ever sailed with in BF.

They were mainly Shelties and Stornowegians and had spent most of their lives around fishing boats and the sea before going deepsea and their professionalism was outstanding.

BF may have had better training facilities for deckies but most of these guys were naturals and were born to it, and it showed.

Regards Phil (Thumb)

BeerSailor
21st January 2008, 19:09
Quote _ Phil
All joking apart, and excluding the catering part timers, the deck crowds in Federal and NZSC were man for man, every bit as good as any deck crowd I ever sailed with in BF.

They were mainly Shelties and Stornowegians and had spent most of their lives around fishing boats and the sea before going deepsea and their professionalism was outstanding. Quote

And the Bosuns were allowed to fill vacancies with their own men from the Islands. Superb natural seamen.

sparkie2182
21st January 2008, 19:24
"more, probably, as they were mainly welshmen and scousers"............

you never did get round to telling us how your job interview for the new zealand diplomatic corps went, phil...............

hee hee

:)

Bill Davies
21st January 2008, 20:38
Quote:The problem with BF was that there was too much bullshit.
I joined the Peleus in '66 the trip after McDavid left her and was told of an incident which had occurred during sailing day inspection on a previous trip.Unquote.
It looks like this is another case of to many years and too many beers again.
Apart from the expletives, McDavid retired in 64 before your career commenced and as usual the story conveniently happened on a previous trip (usually others 'heard about it' or knew some one'). I actually sailed with McDavid in the late 50s and can assure you he would not have acted in such a manner. It didn't happen as you tell it. Furthermore, this contemptuous regard for the deck department in both the Blue Funnel Line and other Companies (waster's & morons') is unmatched anywhere else on this site. I will not enter into debate with you as to whether working on deck was 'rocket science' or the level of competence required required to obtain the EDH and Lifeboat Certificate or whether heaving lines were a piece of string.
Suffice to say you have said in the past you were always being logged when in the Blue Funnel so you are hardly in a position to sit in judgment of anyone. I think that say's it all and needs no further comment from me.

BeerSailor
21st January 2008, 21:04
I wonder if the Moderators would consider combining this thread with Blue Funnel Line Reborn? They are both on the same course, having deviated wildly from the originator's posts, and it would save us having to look at two threads to see the fun! (Thumb)

K urgess
21st January 2008, 21:16
They've been going for so long that merging them would only lead to confusion as the posts got mixed up.
Besides it's all been said and pretty soon one of them is going to peter out.
We live in hope. [=P]

Santos
21st January 2008, 21:32
Quite right Kris it just might hoist the Blue Peter and B F off. (Jester)

Chris.

Phil Saul
22nd January 2008, 22:30
Quote:The problem with BF was that there was too much bullshit.
I joined the Peleus in '66 the trip after McDavid left her and was told of an incident which had occurred during sailing day inspection on a previous trip.Unquote.
It looks like this is another case of to many years and too many beers again.
Apart from the expletives, McDavid retired in 64 before your career commenced and as usual the story conveniently happened on a previous trip (usually others 'heard about it' or knew some one'). I actually sailed with McDavid in the late 50s and can assure you he would not have acted in such a manner. It didn't happen as you tell it. Furthermore, this contemptuous regard for the deck department in both the Blue Funnel Line and other Companies (waster's & morons') is unmatched anywhere else on this site. I will not enter into debate with you as to whether working on deck was 'rocket science' or the level of competence required required to obtain the EDH and Lifeboat Certificate or whether heaving lines were a piece of string.
Suffice to say you have said in the past you were always being logged when in the Blue Funnel so you are hardly in a position to sit in judgment of anyone. I think that say's it all and needs no further comment from me.

Chill out Bill, you take life far too seriously!!
My time at sea was enjoyable but it was a long, long, time ago and the only pleasure I can get from it these days is by winding up jokers like you.
The McDavid story, I heard far too many times for it not to have had an element of truth in it, and it never varied.
As for the "wasters' and 'morons' bit, are you seriously trying to tell me that BF were unique in not having any of this type in their deck crowds.
Get Real.
My so called 'contempt' for deckies is the result of 10 years of working with them and a healthy amount of piss taking between the catering and deck departments, but having said that, if I could do deck work then anyone could!!
I've noticed some 'contempt' for the catering dept in a few of the comments in your previous posts but I doubt that they were a result of a healthy respect for those guys, so it seems that you can dish it out but don't like to get it back.
Finally, as I've already posted on this site in another thread, I was logged every single trip from the time I made rating at 18, and not just with BF, mainly for being late back to the ship where a female was involved, but why that fact should preclude me from passing comment on any other subject on this site is beyond me.
Or is this site becoming reserved for the genteel reminiscenses of ex skippers.
This thread is titled Blue Funnel Nostalgia and I was with BF for five years but seriously when you read it you wouldn't think that BF had any crew below the rank of Middie.
I remember the good times with BF but I can equally remember the crap that went with it.
Lighten up Bill and learn to enjoy a bit of banter. You don't have to take everything I say to heart just because I'm an ex Steward.
Regards Phil (Thumb)

Phil Saul
23rd January 2008, 01:35
Bill,
with regard to the 'wasters' and 'morons' bit in BF crowds, I forgot to add that you mention in a previous post in this thread that some of the 'crowd' in one of the Clytoneus class threw caustic soda over over a few steers which were being carried on deck and these guys were subsequently arrested upon arrival in L,pool.
From 'crowd' I presume you mean deck crowd and if that's not the work of 'morons' then you will have to re-define the word for me.
Knowing 'Bluies' they were probably not arrested for animal cruelty but for wilfully damaging cargo!!!!

Regards Phil (Thumb)

Bill Davies
23rd January 2008, 07:55
I am not excusing anyone. What happened was a disgrace and well described in Richard Woodmans book 'A Voyage East. The McDavid incident was a fabrication. There is a difference.

R651400
23rd January 2008, 16:59
Just read my reply, what a rude horrible person, stick your B/F and Im glad you never sailed on any of my ships... only asked you a simple question, but because I have'nt filled in my profile, I am not worthy of a polite reply...I was at sea and worked my way up as deck boy (peggy) made A.B also Motorman grade1, Its a pitty B.F did'nt teach you some manners the same time they showed you how to chip rust....talk about chips lol

Steady the Buffs, Dick.
There are other Blue Funnellers on the site who are also perplexed by BD's attitude causing such grief.
No wish to see any SN member swing from the yard arm but others in my time have done so for a lot less..

Just had a thought that since the thread was originated by said BD and if I'm on his ignore list he will not have the pleasure of reading it...

Quelle dommage!

Phil Saul
23rd January 2008, 19:44
I am not excusing anyone. What happened was a disgrace and well described in Richard Woodmans book 'A Voyage East. The McDavid incident was a fabrication. There is a difference.

Bill, you have a bit of a habit of dashing into print and upsetting people.
This is an open forum and people can agree with you or disagree with you without becoming mortal enemies.
It's meant to be light hearted and not taken so seriously and if you give every post a reasonable response without taking umbrage at every point I'm sure you will enjoy it rather more.
The McDavid story may well have been a fabrication, but as I said, I heard it far too many times to not believe that there must have been something behind it.
However, as I also pointed out, the thread is titled Blue Funnel Nostalgia and the story concerning McDavid was certainly doing the rounds at the time I joined BF.
It made an impression on me as a boy rating as I was terrified of captains rounds in case something similar happened to me and I knew that being a company man I wouldn't have the balls to tell the captain to 'pick it up your f*cking self'.

Stories like that are what make up nostalgia whether true or not, but it was certainly part of BF 'folk law' at the time, at least as far as the catering dept was concerned.

And you've got to admit, it is funny, isn't it !!

Regards Phil

Peter4447
23rd January 2008, 20:09
I've got to agree with Phil on this one because even in a big concern like the Grey Funnel we had characters who wrote themselves a place in RN 'Folk Lore'.
One that I particularly remember was a member of the Regulating Staff nicknamed 'Pancho'. He arrived on duty a few minutes late one morning and reported himself to his Boss, who was the Master-at-Arms who told him to forget it. This, however, was not good enough for Pancho and he duly placed himself on report and wrote out his own charge sheet! His actions were to became renowed throughout the Fleet!!!
Several other characters spring readily to mind but I think it better not to dwell on the reasons as to why they became 'famous'.
In regard to the Captain McLeod incident, it was common practice in the RN during inspections for certain Captains and Commanders to wear white gloves to ferret out any dust in the nooks and crannies. We hated it at the time but I could'nt name any of the officers that did this. They would only have been memorable if a crew member had told them what to do - again Folk Lore would have taken over.
In my book Nostalgia is by its very defination about looking back with a fondness for what was and with a sense of humour.
Peter4447(Jester)

tacho
23rd January 2008, 20:24
Steady the Buffs, Dick.
There are other Blue Funnellers on the site who are also perplexed by BD or is it "Bidet's" narcissistic attitude.
No wish to see any SN member swing from the yard arm but others in my time have done so for a lot less..

Just had a thought that since the thread was originated by said BD and if I'm on his ignore list he will not have the pleasure of reading it...

Quelle dommage!



This is more offensive than anything BD has ever posted - and if he has to walk the plank you should follow.

K urgess
23rd January 2008, 20:27
Oh Get a life, Tacho.

Santos
23rd January 2008, 20:35
This is more offensive than anything BD has ever posted - and if he has to walk the plank you should follow http://www.addis-welt.de/smilie/smilie/lachen/Animatie%2053.gif just like the trips I knew and loved be handbags at dawn next.

tacho
23rd January 2008, 20:37
Oh Get a life, Tacho

Why don't you do the same! If you're a moderator try and act like one.

As for Santos - I see you're running true to form.

makko
23rd January 2008, 20:38
Tacho, Kris and Chris....????????????
Are we having a particularly bad day?
Bemused, but best regards,
Dave?????

BeerSailor
23rd January 2008, 20:49
All very entertaining but slightly spoilt by a few who take this too seriously. (Cloud)
Refer to the post by Santos/Chris in 'Blue Funnel Line Reborn' which puts all this neatly in to pespective(Thumb)

K urgess
23rd January 2008, 20:51
I'd love you to tell us all exactly how you think a moderator should act, Tacho.

I think the principle I'm looking for is the one that's been mentioned often, Dave. Making posts for posting's sake is pointless. If you don't like it switch it off. Not having a bad day just not suffering fools gladly. I shall be asking you to act as my second soon. The handbags at dawn is looking like a cert.[=P]

Kris

Santos
23rd January 2008, 20:58
tacho if you mean laughing at it all you are so right. I wrote a post on Blue Funnel Reborn which I am not going to repeat here except to say, whats past is past, we ought to be proud of what we were and what we did and should be remembering it with nostalgia not picking a fight at every opportunity. It dosnt matter what flag or funnel we sailed under we all did the same job albeit in slightly different ways.

If Bill wants to treat everyone like he does then let him, it does not do his arguement as to how good Blue Flu people were any good, if his present style of behaviour is an example, it does it alot of harm. That answer to Dick was as nasty as they come and there was no need for it.

This is a site for nostalgia and a bit of fun not constant attrition as you and he seem to want it, if any one needs to walk anything, maybe its you and him that should go ashore for a bit and have a walk round. This is a happy ship and I for one want it to stay that way.

Chris.

Sister Eleff
23rd January 2008, 23:01
Boys, boys, boys. I tried to warn you all in BF Reborn (point 278) that this would all end in tears. We have already lost one valuable member (in my humble opinion) in the last couple of months on another thread, over disparaging remarks - please may we lose no others. You are all important to this ship but please treat each other a little more kindly. (Thumb)

John Briggs
23rd January 2008, 23:09
(==D) Wahoooo, this is wonderful! (Jester) I get my daily chuckle from this and the other BF thread! Thank you Blue Flue for all the entertainment!(Thumb)

Sister Eleff
23rd January 2008, 23:17
(==D) Wahoooo, this is wonderful! (Jester) I get my daily chuckle from this and the other BF thread! Thank you Blue Flue for all the entertainment!(Thumb)

Why is it that when I try to 'pour oil on troubled waters' some b****** comes along and throws a match on it (EEK)

sparkie2182
23rd January 2008, 23:22
i got great odds at ladbrokes that this thread will still be here at easter......................

:)


get onto sportingbet sister eleff...........its a dead cert.

Santos
23rd January 2008, 23:31
Sister Elf, are you sure you are not Zelda from another time. ?

Chris.

Peter4447
23rd January 2008, 23:45
[QUOTE=sparkie2182;180834]i got great odds at ladbrokes that this thread will still be here at easter......................QUOTE]

Your probably right Sparkie.
It reminds me of the first clockwork toy train I had as a youngster that used to run round a circle of track...it didn't go anywhere but was a source of great amusement!

Peter(Jester)

K urgess
23rd January 2008, 23:47
Now we'll get all those jokes about Oomigoomie birds (LOL).

sparkie2182
23rd January 2008, 23:52
i think i saw you on the antiques roadshow peter.............:)

Peter4447
23rd January 2008, 23:55
I might look old but I can assure you I am very young at heart Sparkie!!!
(==D) (==D) (==D) (==D)
Peter

sparkie2182
23rd January 2008, 23:58
i bet you got a fortune for your train set tho...................:)

oceangoer
24th January 2008, 00:08
I remember joining my first Blue Funnel ship like it was yesterday.

It was a gorgeous Sunday afternoon in June when the taxi drew up at the gate to Gladstone Dock, Liverpool where I’d been directed to Blue Funnels
MV Prophylacticus which was loading for Jeddah and points east.

How excited I was, my single (recently polished and still smelling of Brasso) gold stripe glistening in the late day sunshine. We stopped at the gate keeper, “Afternoon, young sir,”, he said “you’ll be wanting the Oilskin?”. I nodded and he directed the cabbie to a ship with an enormous funnel halfway down the wharf. By way of payment for his help I slipped an old Sharps toffee I found in my pocket into his hand. It was covered in fluff, but he seemed very satisfied with his bounty “Thankee, kind sir”, he said tugging at the peak of his cap, respectful (as all Liverpuddlians were) to the Home Counties English accent.

As we drew up at the gangway and I got out of the cab I could see two midshipmen in full blue uniform (caps and all) sitting on a stage polishing the ships side. “What in Gods name are you doing?”, I asked. One little cherub replied “We’d written our letters to Mumsie and Pater and were at a loose end. The Chief Officer suggested we pass the time until dinner doing this. We can’t wait until the other ships crews see our shiny side, they’ll be ever so jealous.” Especially the Stewards in the Cunard, I thought to myself.

A clatter over my head brought the gangwayman to the wharf. “Idwal Effans, sir”, he introduced himself in that Welsh sing song lilt so beloved of the Ben Line Scots tugging his forelock at the same time, “don’t get your nice shiny shoes dirty, sir, walk over me”, and he lay face down between the taxi and the bottom of the gangway. I walked across his back and then he collected my luggage from the cab and followed me aboard …………………..

………………. those were the days.

sparkie2182
24th January 2008, 00:15
followed by two dozen cunard stewards..................

as you say, oceangoer..........

those were the days........:)

R651400
24th January 2008, 06:10
This is more offensive than anything BD has ever posted - and if he has to walk the plank you should follow.
Tacho In the interests of SN harmony and good manners, I take your point and have altered my input accordingly. You may wish to do the same?

Bill Davies
24th January 2008, 09:50
(==D) Wahoooo, this is wonderful! (Jester) I get my daily chuckle from this and the other BF thread! Thank you Blue Flue for all the entertainment!(Thumb)

Careful John, people will start taking you seriously. Thought you were a confirmed member of the 'crazy Gang' and 'Virtual voyage sect'

Brgds

Bill

John Briggs
24th January 2008, 11:33
I am Bill, I am, but this is just as good!

billyboy
24th January 2008, 11:43
heh heh heh...i reserve comment at this stage. Hope this thread goes on for a long time lads.

sparkie2182
24th January 2008, 20:21
me 2.................. untill easter is fine

sylvesterheng
27th January 2008, 15:23
Sure, I sailed with JC Liptrot, the thing i remembered him most was is drumming fingers and Johnny Bold was my old man on the Liverpool Bay.Cheers, Sylvester Heng in Singapore

Bill Davies
27th January 2008, 17:49
Sailed with Bold when he was a relatively junior Ch.Off around 57. I always liked Bold. Liptrot well.....he was different.

Bill

Hugh Ferguson
27th January 2008, 19:24
When I transferred, in Singapore, from the SAMCREE-as a time expired middy-to the homeward STENTOR in Dec.1946, there was in her a Chinese middy by the name of Tao Chi Yuen. I wonder if there is anyone who may have known him.
The STENTOR had just come from Kure and somebody had visited Hiroshima and picked up a piece of glass which had melted in the heat of the A-bomb blast. It was used as the half-deck ash tray. The master was Captain Sturrock; mate, Mr Wood; 2nd mate, Arnold; 3rd mate, N.Joyce; 4th mate, Julian Holt.
Five years later it was Mr Joyce who transferred from a Bluey in Singapore, when we in the GLENROY lost our chief officer, R. Carruthers who was promoted to master in a ship where the captain had been taken ill. Mr Joyce remained in the GLENROY for the succeeding voyage and you can see a reference to him in my Day Off In Kobe post in Mess Deck. If John Bull is regarded as a British icon then Mr Joyce was the Australian equivalent. A fine ship-mate and an excellent chief officer , sadly now crossed the bar. The last time I saw him was one of those extraordinary occasions when you find yourself standing behind somebody, in a queue in London, whose rear is vaguely familiar. T'was the man himself, all 16 stone of him!
Are any of these names known to anyone?

oceangoer
27th January 2008, 20:58
3rd mate, N.Joyce. T'was the man himself, all 16 stone of him! Are any of these names known to anyone?

"Fatty" Joyce was Mate in Diomed in 1960/61 and then transferred to an "M" boat (I think).

Bill Davies
28th January 2008, 10:30
Hugh,

Vaguely recollect the name but never sailed with him.

Bill

Graham McMorine
1st February 2008, 21:35
"Fatty" Joyce was Mate in Diomed in 1960/61 and then transferred to an "M" boat (I think).

He "coasted" the Astyanax in January 1965 from Victoria dock London to Birkenhead, my first encounter with Blue Flue. (POP)

Hugh Ferguson
3rd February 2008, 08:51
He "coasted" the Astyanax in January 1965 from Victoria dock London to Birkenhead, my first encounter with Blue Flue. (POP)

You don't say if it was a good experience , or a bad experience!?

Bill Davies
3rd February 2008, 16:55
Does anyone remember Paddy Hartnett 3/off ('Clytoneus' 58)

Graham McMorine
3rd February 2008, 19:05
Do`nt remember much about him ,Hugh mate. All I can recall is that he was a bit on the large side and that it was the closest I ever came to being sea sick, as it was bloody rough coming round Cornwall(POP)

joebuckham
3rd February 2008, 20:22
Seem to recall the practice of removing the pin feather on the '10 ton gear' (stowed in No.5 store) was not emulated in any of the eight British Flag tramp compannies I sailed in following BF . Another BF practice unique to that company??? Could never see the benefit but others would argue. Did the practice have its roots in some incident??

i have seen cargo loaded in many ways, and having served my time and sailed in lowly tramps have had a very hands on experience with derricks etc., right through my sea going career.

now having ploughed my way through many seamanship tomes in search of an answer but to no avail and not wanting to appear to be the dummy i thought to bide my time and let someone else ask the question and be the fall guy.

however it would appear that i am the only one of this esteemed company that does not know what a pin feather is, so please bill can you or one of the many in the know, enlighten me.

b rgds

and don't all shout at once

railroadbill
4th February 2008, 16:24
"Fatty" Joyce was Mate in Diomed in 1960/61 and then transferred to an "M" boat (I think).

I sailed with Captain Noel Joyce on MV Memnon between Aug'71 and May'72 on the Blue Sea run. (USA-Far East/South East Asia Service) He had his Dutch wife Enoka with him . I think she was called Enoka. Jack Waters was also the Chief Engineer.
Noel was a good bloke too.(Thumb)

Peter Martin
4th February 2008, 16:57
I was also there! Remember leaving Newport News for Singapore, I think, and it was OM's Birthday so to the bar we went. His wife as well. She was a stunning lady and about 20 years younger than him. She used to sun bathe in an orange bikini on the monkey island. What a thing to send a young Middie's pulse racing.

Bill Davies
23rd February 2008, 11:31
Name Pronunciation

Do any of you or more likelyyour wives/girlfriends remember calling India Buildings inquiring into when a certain ship was due to arrive. One would invariably be corrected by the telephonist who would say 'Don't you mean the xxxxx' If you phoned back an hour later and asked the same question you would be again corrected to the former name you referred an hour ago. Example 'Menestheus' would be 'Menes Theus' and 'Menelaus' could be 'Mena Laus).
There must be dozens. Any other other examples.
Those 'snooty' India Buildings office girls used to get up my nose. I hope I have explained the irritation well.

Bill

rothesian
23rd February 2008, 11:37
Name Pronunciation

Do any of you or more likelyyour wives/girlfriends remember calling India Buildings inquiring into when a certain ship was due to arrive. One would invariably be corrected by the telephonist who would say 'Don't you mean the xxxxx' If you phoned back an hour later and asked the same question you would be again corrected to the former name you referred an hour ago. Example 'Menestheus' would be 'Menes Theus' and 'Menelaus' could be 'Mena Laus).
There must be dozens. Any other other examples.
Those 'snooty' India Buildings office girls used to get up my nose. I hope I have explained the irritation well.

Bill

I fully understand your irritation, Bill. Mind you I did marry one of them
brgds
Alistair(Thumb)

Bill Davies
23rd February 2008, 12:06
Alistair,

Apologies! If I may redeem myself I am talking 55/61 and having quickly read your posts I understand you are 64 vintage.
What do they say 'When you are in a hole'

Brgds

Bill

rothesian
23rd February 2008, 21:52
No worries Bill
She keeps telling me I'm the lucky one
We met at the Blue Funnel do for their centenary (once in a hundred years) and got married in 67(Thumb)

brgds
Alistair

Bill Davies
8th March 2008, 18:10
Peggy's Duties
I know that this will apply to all companies and I welcome your input.
Before the days of liquid soap etc I recall a method for producing the suds prior to washing up the Mess plates as follows:
An empty jam container (Greengage or similar) was fitted with a wire handle to hang over the hot water tap. The container was half filled with 'diced' bar soap and there you have all the suds you needed. When did this practice finish??
Any other memories

Sister Eleff
9th March 2008, 04:56
I too have seen this but can't remember where or when. Or the bar of soap was in a wire cage with handle & was swished it round in the warm water. Perhaps it was when the 'squeezy squirt' (!) bottles came in - or there again when it was discovered that bars of soap harboured germs.

oceangoer
9th March 2008, 05:38
Peggy's Duties
The container was half filled with 'diced' bar soap and there you have all the suds you needed. When did this practice finish??

When Blue Flu started buying Teepol +/- 1962.

Bill Davies
21st March 2008, 22:57
Punter,
Many thanks your post. I can assure you it was not -1962 and if it was it was a secret.
Bill

oceangoer
22nd March 2008, 01:09
Bill,
,
I can assure you it was not -1962 and if it was it was a secret.


Sorry to rain on your parade Bill, but I can assure you that we had Teepol on Menelaus, Antenor, Laomedon, Atreus, Glenartney, and Glenogle. Four deep-sea, two coasts late 1961 - Feb '63. Came in a 5 gallon square can. Lampy used to make a hole in the corner and issue it like shots of scotch. :)

Mates preferred Teepol because it didn't leave that chalky residue behind which had to be removed.

Bill Davies
22nd March 2008, 13:10
Punter,
We have drifted a little as I was really addressing the device used as a Peggy for 'washing up'. I am well aware of Teepol and it's uses and in particularly in the way you suggest. Thanks all the same.

Bill

Jim Howarth
16th April 2008, 16:25
Doea anyone remember Tommy Morris? He was an AB on "Demodocus" - fell from the foremast in the Red Sea and sustained fatal injuries. What an absolute pearl of a bloke he was!

As new member I was reading through the Blue Funnel threads and came upon this one. I sailed with both Tommy and Jimmy Morris, both of whom were excellent seamen. Tommy actually fell from one of the columns on the Machaon in early 1964. I remember it well as I was the peggy standing on the deck at the other end of the gantline. It was my first trip deep sea and we were in the Med homeward bound. We took Tommy home in the spud locker. The skipper was Punchard ,the Lampy Tony Casson. I think the Bosun was a Welshman called Roberts who considered himself the Commodore Bosun and wore a mates cap to prove it. He spent the whole voyage laid up with a bad leg. Not the happiest of ships before this incident, certainly not after it.

Jim Howarth
16th April 2008, 16:58
Punter,
We have drifted a little as I was really addressing the device used as a Peggy for 'washing up'. I am well aware of Teepol and it's uses and in particularly in the way you suggest. Thanks all the same.

Bill

I agree with you Bill. Teepol was available but used only in the Lampy's special soogy mix. The poor peggy had to make the best of it with a conny onny tin with holes punched in it and chippings of carbolic soap. Not the best way to get grease of plates, certainly not to the standard expected from the crowds I sailed with.

Trevorw
16th April 2008, 20:00
As new member I was reading through the Blue Funnel threads and came upon this one. I sailed with both Tommy and Jimmy Morris, both of whom were excellent seamen. Tommy actually fell from one of the columns on the Machaon in early 1964. I remember it well as I was the peggy standing on the deck at the other end of the gantline. It was my first trip deep sea and we were in the Med homeward bound. We took Tommy home in the spud locker. The skipper was Punchard ,the Lampy Tony Casson. I think the Bosun was a Welshman called Roberts who considered himself the Commodore Bosun and wore a mates cap to prove it. He spent the whole voyage laid up with a bad leg. Not the happiest of ships before this incident, certainly not after it.
I was on that ship during that voyage when Tommy Morris lost his life. I'm sorry to disagree, but I thought it was a very happy ship, I did four trips on her!
Actually the Bosun didn't have a bad leg - he had trouble with his water works and couldn't pee! The Chief Officer, who'se name escapes me, filled a bath with cold water and ice cubes and immersed the bosun in it. It wasn't long before the water turned yellow!
I also, very sadly, remember, assisting the Chief Officer to shave Tommy, just after we picked up the Liverpool Pilot.

Sudden flash of inspiration - the Chief Officer's name was Len Henshall!

Trevorw
16th April 2008, 20:09
Peggy's Duties
I know that this will apply to all companies and I welcome your input.
Before the days of liquid soap etc I recall a method for producing the suds prior to washing up the Mess plates as follows:
An empty jam container (Greengage or similar) was fitted with a wire handle to hang over the hot water tap. The container was half filled with 'diced' bar soap and there you have all the suds you needed. When did this practice finish??
Any other memories
I remember that the Passenger's Dining Saloon Stewards would use Piccadilly ciggie tins, literally made from tin, in some secret way to replate the saloon EPNS - don't ask me how they did it, but they were always on the hunt for Piccadilly tins!

Phil Saul
16th April 2008, 22:38
I remember that the Passenger's Dining Saloon Stewards would use Piccadilly ciggie tins, literally made from tin, in some secret way to replate the saloon EPNS - don't ask me how they did it, but they were always on the hunt for Piccadilly tins!

Soda crystals, tin foil and boiling water in zinc bath.
Pop your silver in and - Voila !!
Silverware comes out like new.

Regards Phil (Thumb)

Dave Wilson
18th April 2008, 12:28
Tommy actually fell from one of the columns on the Machaon in early 1964. .

Columns? Is this BF speak for Sampson Posts/Masts?

Dave

Trader
18th April 2008, 18:01
Columns? Is this BF speak for Sampson Posts/Masts?

Dave

Yes Dave. It is Blue Flue for Samson posts.

Trader.

Bill Davies
20th April 2008, 08:54
Blue Funnel Speak
Trader,
Would be interesting to compile a list of BF deck anomalies. The foc'sle bell ringing highlighted recently and this one are typical. From 68 onwards my own nautical vocabulary underwent an even greater change than that on leaving 'the China' and that was the influence of the American Senior Mates & Engineers in NBC. Bell books etc,.

Trader
20th April 2008, 17:47
Blue Funnel Speak
Trader,
Would be interesting to compile a list of BF deck anomalies. The foc'sle bell ringing highlighted recently and this one are typical. From 68 onwards my own nautical vocabulary underwent an even greater change than that on leaving 'the China' and that was the influence of the American Senior Mates & Engineers in NBC. Bell books etc,.

We never called a cabin a "cabin", it was always a "room". Do you recall that Bill?.

Trader

Bill Davies
20th April 2008, 18:51
Trader,
That's right and I had not give it a though in all these years. You have me thinking now about a 'run in' with 'Big Jack Cleary' around 57 whilst making up a 'topping lift'. In 'the china' we have our own way of doing things son which does not allow for hand fisted interpretatin he said. His pronounced Wicklow action could not get the interpretation out. Smile at your peril.
You did not smile or back chat Jack. A bit like Joe Kavanagh.

Pat Kennedy
20th April 2008, 19:26
Trader,
That's right and I had not give it a though in all these years. You have me thinking now about a 'run in' with 'Big Jack Cleary' around 57 whilst making up a 'topping lift'. In 'the china' we have our own way of doing things son which does not allow for hand fisted interpretatin he said. His pronounced Wicklow action could not get the interpretation out. Smile at your peril.
You did not smile or back chat Jack. A bit like Joe Kavanagh.

Bill,
And HE never smiled either!
I was P.O's peggy round the land with him, and a carpenter named Gordon Ford. They hated the sight of each other, and the atmosphere in their messroom could be cut with a knife.
A good seaman maybe, but I found him to be a nasty piece of work. The only words he ever spoke to me were "You F*** Off and come back when I've finished eating."
These days I work in a Local Govt office in Birkenhead and one of our admin staff is married to one of Jack's sons. She remembers him as a kindly affectionate old geezer!
Pat

tony poutch
20th April 2008, 19:26
On one trip with JOE Kavanagh when i was peggy i was looking down at 2 abs having a bit of a scuffle on the well deck,along came the BO had a look for a minute,turned around and said well they can't fight lets see if they can work
they were 2 tired chaps come knock off.

price
21st April 2008, 08:59
In my peggyship, I sailed with three bosuns, Ralph Ball, Tommy Hogan and Joe O'neil, I don't remember having problems with any of them, Joe O'neil, with whom I sailed for two years was in my mind the best bosun that I ever had the good fortune to sail with, apart from being a good seaman, he was a fair man and good shipmate.
Bruce.

Bill Davies
21st April 2008, 19:31
Pat,
Jack Cleary could be intimidating, if not darn right frightening for a 'peggy' but I found him alright. An excellent seaman.

Tony,
Joe Kavanagh was an another exceptional man and well respected in the company.

Bruce,
Joe o'Neil was as you say a gentle in addition to an excellent seaman which was to be expected.

PS: There were three Bosuns in 'the china' sometimes referred to as the 'big three' alll from Wicklow, Paddy Proctor, Joe Kavanagh & Jack Cleary. I heard they were related.
Paddy was the Senior Bosun and was in Peleus 61 onwards.
Happy days!

price
21st April 2008, 20:00
Bill,
I never sailed with the 'Big Three' as you call them but their names were legend in my time.
Joe O'neil was only a slight man but in general commanded respect by his manner and obvious ability, not many people tried to cross him. It was said that Joe once fought Benny Lynch, whether it was in the ring or some where else I don't remember.
Bruce.

Pat Kennedy
22nd April 2008, 10:40
In my peggyship, I sailed with three bosuns, Ralph Ball, Tommy Hogan and Joe O'neil, I don't remember having problems with any of them, Joe O'neil, with whom I sailed for two years was in my mind the best bosun that I ever had the good fortune to sail with, apart from being a good seaman, he was a fair man and good shipmate.
Bruce.

Tommy Hogan, I sailed with him on one ship, he was nicknamed "the binman", for some reason

Bill Davies
22nd April 2008, 23:19
Pat,

That's a name I do not even recall!

Bill

Pat Kennedy
23rd April 2008, 12:14
Well Bill, he wasn't very memorable1
here's a couple more you may have come across; Bert Trapnell, bosun on the Nestor, and the infamous Harry Hands, bosun on the Memnon, who was an inveterate teller of tall tales. He informed us that on one Bluey under attack by a German raider, he had fought his way forar'd along a blazing well deck, and pitched two unexploded shells over the side.
we learned that the best way to extend smoko indefinitely was to ask Harry about his wartime exploits just as he came down the alleyway to turn us to.
Pat

price
23rd April 2008, 12:50
Hello Pat,
I agree with you, Tommy Hogan wasn't very memorable, I have some ideas why he was nicknamed the Binman although I haven't heard that expression used before about TH.. He was ok with us peggy's.
Bruce.

Pat Kennedy
23rd April 2008, 13:08
Tommy was Ok with us, I agree, hardly spoke to anyone, and used to retreat to his room as soon as he had turned the crowd to.
Hers another couple that you may have met;
Ned Phillips a Welshman who used to wear a flat cap and muffler, and a docker's overcoat in cold weather, he looked like an old hill farmer.
Mickey Austin, nicknamed the "Screaming Skull" when on the Eumaeus, because of his rasping voice and bony features. His bark was worse than his bite, he was actually a good guy.
Pat

Bill Davies
23rd April 2008, 18:28
There was a Dutchman Theo Van De Bloom who used to drink in The Queens, Liscard. Heard they have a photograph of him over the bar. Remember Harry Hands and Mick Austin. Although I have already said I did not recognize the name Tommy Hogan I do recall the nickname 'The Binman'.

Brgds to you both

Bill

Trader
23rd April 2008, 22:30
Pat,
Jack Cleary could be intimidating, if not darn right frightening for a 'peggy' but I found him alright. An excellent seaman.

Tony,
Joe Kavanagh was an another exceptional man and well respected in the company.

Bruce,
Joe o'Neil was as you say a gentle in addition to an excellent seaman which was to be expected.

PS: There were three Bosuns in 'the china' sometimes referred to as the 'big three' alll from Wicklow, Paddy Proctor, Joe Kavanagh & Jack Cleary. I heard they were related.
Paddy was the Senior Bosun and was in Peleus 61 onwards.
Happy days!

I think that I have mentioned before Bill that I sailed with Jake Cleary on the "Astyanax" in 1955. As you say he could be intimidating sometimes, especially when he didn't have his front teeth in and showing his "fangs". He was very fair though and I learnt a lot from him as a first trip EDH.
The bosun who I served my peggyship (Bruces term) with was Bill Thomas on the "Bellerophon". He was from Amlych and was like a father to us deck boys, he once told me off for smoking too much. I spent two years on that ship, almost all Welsh crew on deck,(six Jones's).
Theo Jones was AB on there at the time Bill, would this be the same Theo (alehouse) Jones that I have seen you mention on this site before. He was from, I think, Pen-y-groes.
The last Bluey that I sailed on was the "Neleus" on the Aussie run. Our first bosun was Spud Murphy who unfortunately took ill in Sydney and the Lampy, Danny Proctor took over.
Danny didn't want the bosuns job full time and the next trip we had Jimmy Mason. A lovely man from Wallasey I think.
All in all in my four years with the Blueys I never came across a bad bosun. I sailed with a few more on the coast whose names escape me.

Trader.

Bill Davies
23rd April 2008, 22:48
Trader,
Theo (Ale House) Jones was Ch.Mate in 55 and was from Chwilog along with another Ch.Mate Hughie Davies. You are right that Danny was content with the Lampys job. He was a cousin of Paddy and also from Arklow. I understand he died in Rotterdam around 63. Butch Mason was a nice man and I often enjoyed a pint with him in either the Rose & Crown or the Boot Inn both in Wallasey. He was a good friend of Billy Carmode.

Bill

Bill Davies
26th April 2008, 21:07
I am looking for confirmation from Blue Funnel Mates of the 50s/60s vintage of the promotion to Master and time spent in each rank. From memory:
1. Second Mates (FG) : Fourth Mate
2. First Mate (FG) : Third Mate
3. Master (FG) : Second Mate.......usually 5 years and age 32.
4. Chief Mate..........usually 12/13 years and age 44/45
5. Master (45)

Any comments Hugh!!


Bill

oceangoer
26th April 2008, 23:05
1. Second Mates (FG) : Fourth Mate
2. First Mate (FG) : Third Mate
3. Master (FG) : Second Mate.......usually 5 years and age 32.
4. Chief Mate..........usually 12/13 years and age 44/45
5. Master (45)


That's pretty close as I recall except you could sometimes get a 3rd Mates job if you were close to sitting Mates. Bit light on for 2nd Mate .... between 6 and 8 years was more common in the early 60's, Mate also light on, exceptions may have managed 44/45 but the vast bulk went to 50 before they got the "golden ring" and a tiger. :)

Bill Davies
27th April 2008, 08:24
Thanks for that punter as I thought I was a little light on time. I have made several posts in the past recalling an incident in 61 when I was called into India Building in 61 on passing Second Mates (FG). I remember standing in front of Capt Gepp, and three Directors who told me to 'keep your nose clean sonny and you will have your own command by the time you are 50'. That is something an ambitious 21 year old does not want to hear!. Walked the several hundred yards down the road to Mann Island and promptly obtained a 3rd Mates berth on a tramp.

Pat Kennedy
27th April 2008, 19:35
Bill,
I think I remember that Captain Gepp you mentioned, wasn't he the chap that always appeared at the quayside wearing a bowler hat, when docking in Birkenhead?
And the Captain Liptrott mentioned earlier in this thread was Mate on the Achilles on my first voyage.By the sound of it he was heartily disliked by all who sailed with him but I can honestly say he never bothered me, probably because I, as a peggy, was below his radar.

Bill Davies
27th April 2008, 19:53
Pat,

You have it right. Capt Gepp was Chief Marine Superintendant and always sported a Bowler. I also sailed with J.C. Liptrot around the land around 58 (Antenor). Probably the most unpleasant man I ever had the misfortune to sail with and considering he was 'off deck' one would have thought he would have offered encouragement. Was in his company again end 68 on completion of Extra's but could not bring myself to acknowledge him.

Brgds

Bill

Bill Davies
27th April 2008, 20:03
Pat,
Please see post #26. I'd forgotten I had mentioned him before. He must have had a bad effect on me.

Bill

Pat Kennedy
27th April 2008, 20:05
Talking about radar Bill, did you ever come across Captain Robb,nicknamed Radar Robb, who was absolutely obsessed with the new technology. apparently he had played some part in its development, or at least its application as a ship handling tool. On that Achilles he was forever ordering round turns with his head buried in the hood.
Regards,
Pat

Bill Davies
27th April 2008, 20:19
The man was legend in 'the china' and I heard many a tale about him, all good. Never sailed with him myself.

makko
28th April 2008, 01:43
I had forgotten to mention earlier in the thread "Dickie" Richards, my first OM. A larger than life character but a good bloke. He used to host "Port and cheese" afternoons for the wives. He would also order a round for everyone before departing in the evening or leave a case out! His signature continues to fascinate me!
Rgds.
Dave

oceangoer
28th April 2008, 02:33
Capt Gepp was Chief Marine Superintendant and always sported a Bowler.

"Diomed" 1960, no crew ... all Middies .... departing Birkenhead for points East. Gepp is on the wharf along with the rest of the departure 'inspection' brigade, standby is blown and all hands turn to in bowler hats and football jerseys except for the Bosun's Mate who's wearing a Top Hat and tails. Went down like a lead balloon.

I thought "Fatty" Joyce (the Mate) was going to have apoplexy.

BTW anyone remember Capt. "Typhoon" Charlie Collett, sailed with him in Glengyle, a real gentleman who had a penchant for trying to find the eye of typhoons and being the first to broadcast the location.

Bill Davies
28th April 2008, 19:24
Sailed with Collett around the land. If it was deep sea I would remember the ship. I'll consult the discharge book.
Anyone sailed with Capt. McMillan?

tony poutch
28th April 2008, 23:41
Sailed with Capt Collett on Peleus 1967 Lofty Reynolds was Bosun

Trader
29th April 2008, 00:06
I sailed with a Ch/Off. named Collett on the "Bellerophon" around 1954. He was quite old to be a Mate. It goes to show what Bill Davies has been saying all along...promotion was slow.
He wasn't my cup of tea.

Trader.

Bill Davies
29th April 2008, 07:49
As I only coasted with Collett I cannot put a face to the name. However, Hughie Davies and Theo Jones were at least 50 when obtaining command. Hard to imagine how anyone could wait for so long.