Hair cuts at Port Said/Kobe /Dyak style.

ian keyl
19th September 2007, 01:22
Do any of you out there remember "bloody deadly" he was the Egyptian barber who came on board with a small leather case proclaiming to be a professional hairdresser, he was more like a drunk Aussie trying to shear a sheep whos fleece is full of sand and the poor animal ends up with chunks of flesh out of it and eventualy bleeds to death.

Well deadly would invite you to do it in your cabin (just so he could see what you had for giving away,stealing or change -change) but clearing the skin and blood up was too much ,so out on deck and sitting on a bollard under the deck lights in the cool night air.(waiting for the convoy south to start)

He would start first to ask how you would pay ,I will take any kind of money Scotch money Aberdeen money ,washing powder ,Oh! sir have you any Bri- nylon shirts this i like very much, then down to business rummaging in his case for some supposidly sharp heads for his clippers and hopefully ones that were not gummed up with congealed with blood.
He would put his little tin (old Capstain round cig tin ) on the opposite bollard with some old cotton wool in it and the frech chalk to poly filla up the gaps in your neck and ears.

A haircut from him was deadly there was no doubt but he got plenty of takers ,its a good job nothing like aids was around in those days other wise he would have doubled the injured parties with cross contamination .

The other extreme was heaven in KOBE in the Moto Matchi just next to the old Dia Maru store, there was a little barber shop, in this shop they would not touch you until they had washed your hair first and then massaged your scalp.
Your hair would be cut then hot towels wrapped round your head for about five mintues then they would plunge your head in ice cold water before a final massage and splashing of the varoius colonges.
You came out of there feeling like a million dollars ready to take on all the bars and girls in the moto matchi and to finish up with a Kobe steak.

The other way when broke and on the jungle run was to have the second mate cut your hair on the Benhope we had a lad called Jimmy Ang Gang from Kota Kinabalo (formely Jesselton Sarawak ) Jimmy was from a true Borneo Dyak head hunter family, a great bloke and hard as nuts only about 4'10" with out his shore side platforms.
Jimmy always said he could cut hair but the chart room sissors were never sharp and with a Rothmans in his mouth all the time more hair was singed than cut . Jimmys idea was lift up a chunk of hair with the comb and cut away what was underneath ,then drop the other part down on top ( camaflauge comes to mind) .
The fringe usually ended well up your forehead hardly noticeable.Trimming the side burns dry with a gillette blade was painful.

There again it was all free and if Jimmy was feeling kind as he often did (rich) because these guys paid no UK tax ,then he would treat you to a few tinnies of Tennants.

Maybe this story is the Good Bad and Ugly, i am not sure in what order.
Jimmy I understand is a pilot in Labuan.
Rgds Ian.

john fraser
19th September 2007, 08:37
Do any of you out there remember "bloody deadly" he was the Egyptian barber who came on board with a small leather case proclaiming to be a professional hairdresser, he was more like a drunk Aussie trying to shear a sheep whos fleece is full of sand and the poor animal ends up with chunks of flesh out of it and eventualy bleeds to death.

Well deadly would invite you to do it in your cabin (just so he could see what you had for giving away,stealing or change -change) but clearing the skin and blood up was too much ,so out on deck and sitting on a bollard under the deck lights in the cool night air.(waiting for the convoy south to start)

He would start first to ask how you would pay ,I will take any kind of money Scotch money Aberdeen money ,washing powder ,Oh! sir have you any Bri- nylon shirts this i like very much, then down to business rummaging in his case for some supposidly sharp heads for his clippers and hopefully ones that were not gummed up with congealed with blood.
He would put his little tin (old Capstain round cig tin ) on the opposite bollard with some old cotton wool in it and the frech chalk to poly filla up the gaps in your neck and ears.

A haircut from him was deadly there was no doubt but he got plenty of takers ,its a good job nothing like aids was around in those days other wise he would have doubled the injured parties with cross contamination .

The other extreme was heaven in KOBE in the Moto Matchi just next to the old Dia Maru store, there was a little barber shop, in this shop they would not touch you until they had washed your hair first and then massaged your scalp.
Your hair would be cut then hot towels wrapped round your head for about five mintues then they would plunge your head in ice cold water before a final massage and splashing of the varoius colonges.
You came out of there feeling like a million dollars ready to take on all the bars and girls in the moto matchi and to finish up with a Kobe steak.

The other way when broke and on the jungle run was to have the second mate cut your hair on the Benhope we had a lad called Jimmy Ang Gang from Kota Kinabalo (formely Jesselton Sarawak ) Jimmy was from a true Borneo Dyak head hunter family, a great bloke and hard as nuts only about 4'10" with out his shore side platforms.
Jimmy always said he could cut hair but the chart room sissors were never sharp and with a Rothmans in his mouth all the time more hair was singed than cut . Jimmys idea was lift up a chunk of hair with the comb and cut away what was underneath ,then drop the other part down on top ( camaflauge comes to mind) .
The fringe usually ended well up your forehead hardly noticeable.Trimming the side burns dry with a gillette blade was painful.

There again it was all free and if Jimmy was feeling kind as he often did (rich) because these guys paid no UK tax ,then he would treat you to a few tinnies of Tennants.

Maybe this story is the Good Bad and Ugly, i am not sure in what order.
Jimmy I understand is a pilot in Labuan.
Rgds Ian.
We were in Port Said on Bencleuch when the 6 day war broke out."Bloody Deadly"came on board telling us to get our hair cut before the Jews arrived.
There was another notable barber.Ian,but a decent one,that was Hughie the tally clerk in the Rejang river.

albert.s.i
19th September 2007, 09:30
i must confess all the trips i made east of suez i cannot remember a barber comming onboard my first ship was the lord gladstone i was a fireman then on 24/10 a month the only bum boat i remember was geordge roby and he seemed to last forever as far as hair cuts were concerned threre was always one of the crew ready to whip it off. cheers! albert s i

PollY Anna
19th September 2007, 10:09
Hi guys a nice little story about a haircut and a D/G in Port Said. We arrived in the early morning and he appeared from the bowels of the ship and announced to all 'n' sundry that he was going to have a hair cut, not just any hair cut, but the lot removed his intention was to look like a billiard ball. Too dammed hot down there especially as our destination was the Persian Gulf (Mina Al Amade) off he went (Fortunately he didn't meet Bloody Deadly as it was a nice job) came back looking like the cue ball.

A wise old hand advised him to get a hat to cover his head as the sun was rising and it was getting hotter by the moment. Off he trotted and purchased a peak cap from the local bum boats. Trouble was he didn't realize that it had tiny air holes all across the dome by midday his head was covered in tiny red squares just like noughts & crosses. you can imagine the fun the crew had with him for the rest of the trip.

Regards Ron

Joe Freeman
20th September 2007, 20:18
Hi Ian, I remember the third mate George Marriot on Benvalla in 1966 used to cut hair for a couple of beers and he did a fine job. One day he asked who would cut his hair for him, so me having worked in a ladies hairdresser as a young lad volunteered in exchange for my hair being cut. Needless to say we had several beers previously and the haircuts were a little on the close side and not to even. I always remember Georges remark "The difference between a good haircut and a bad one is two weeks" needless to say by the time we reached London the hair had all grown back, short but acceptable.
Keep the stories coming, I have a couple to tell as well.
Joe Freeman

billmaca
20th September 2007, 23:12
in the early 60's there was a lad used to come on board we just called him scouse as that was the accent he would start with ,but then he would change to watever accent of the person he was clipping , unlike this deadly character he was a good barber, I think he picked up the accents from the british troops stationed out there in the 50's

Billy

wully farquhar
27th January 2008, 22:11
Would that be the charactor Jock Magregor, Billy,he could reel of any accent you wanted,but don't remember him cutting hair,yes he would chance it!!!

Alistair Spence
6th March 2008, 17:25
If you were getting your hair cut you must have been planning a run ashore in Singapore

Jim S
6th March 2008, 18:16
In the 1960's I remember a barber shop near one of the London Docks - Tilbury I think.
The sign in window said - Ship's Hair Cuts Repaired.
Says it all really

bulwark
6th March 2008, 22:43
Wullie
I remember Jock Macgregor very well. No matter where you came from - he'd been there.
We had a couple of old cailleachs as passengers and they bought nylon stockings from him seeing they were so cheap, but they didn't realise till it was too late that there was only one stocking in each pack, he was a rogue.
Murdo

vasco
7th March 2008, 09:29
Many a lad went ashore in Taiwan for a haircut only to come back with the same hair length but a big smile on his face.

I was warned about these hair dressers by a lady I met. They seem quite surprised I really (and only) wanted my hair cut.

celsis
8th March 2008, 09:56
Talking about hair and Singapore reminds me of the time we joined the Vorlich in 1974. I had hair down to my shoulders and tucked it all in underneath the collar of my shirt.

'They'll no tak ma hair,' said one of the ABs. At immigration, he was presented with a pair of wallpaper scissors or the option of a wee room with a barber present.

And I got through without a backward glance!