Hong Kong Baskets

Trevorw
20th October 2007, 17:31
Does anyone remember these? They were the best cabin trunks ever! You bought a rattan basket with a hinged lid (the same size as a trunk) in Hong Kong, then the Bosun or Chippie used to cover it in canvas and stitch it on with a palm and needle. After that it was painted grey or green; the canvas shrunk and you ended up with the most robust and lightweight piece of luggage imaginable!

Bill Davies
20th October 2007, 20:53
Does anyone remember these? They were the best cabin trunks ever! You bought a rattan basket with a hinged lid (the same size as a trunk) in Hong Kong, then the Bosun or Chippie used to cover it in canvas and stitch it on with a palm and needle. After that it was painted grey or green; the canvas shrunk and you ended up with the most robust and lightweight piece of luggage imaginable!

Still have one. 'Antenor' vintage 58. Courtesy of Angus Cummings (Lampy) from Eriskay.

Trevorw
20th October 2007, 23:37
Still have one. 'Antenor' vintage 58. Courtesy of Angus Cummings (Lampy) from Eriskay.

And were'nt they absolutely brilliant!? Mine did me 20 deep-sea trips and then remained as a storage unit in my garage for years afterwards!

captkenn
21st October 2007, 02:06
And were'nt they absolutely brilliant!? Mine did me 20 deep-sea trips and then remained as a storage unit in my garage for years afterwards!

Mine is still in the loft full of Nories Tables and such like nautical treasures!

R651400
21st October 2007, 08:31
Still have one. 'Antenor' vintage 58. Courtesy of Angus Cummings (Lampy) from Eriskay.
Mine was Glenbeg vintage 58 expertly canvassed, corded and painted grey by the senior middie. What a boon in this present day need for lightweight luggage.
Re my thread Java Sparrows, I bought a large brown paper bag of rice seed to feed the birds on the homeward trip. The bag burst inside the basket on the rail journey home and right up to my giving my basket away in the eighties there was still rice seeds filtering through the wickerwork.

Tai Pan
21st October 2007, 12:25
Had mine for years after, used as a childrens toy box (canvas removed). what about champhor wood chests, bought mine in Shanghai, still in use today.

Trevorw
21st October 2007, 14:24
And opium tables to say nothing of Mikimoto pearls!!

Bill Davies
21st October 2007, 15:15
Had mine for years after, used as a childrens toy box (canvas removed). what about champhor wood chests, bought mine in Shanghai, still in use today.

Camphor wood chest from the Friendship store (Shanghai) still has pride of place on my landing. Constant reminder of the BF days

Trevorw
21st October 2007, 23:25
Bill,

Do you remember Tsingtao beer? Now that's what I call a beer!

Bill Davies
22nd October 2007, 00:38
That beer is now readily available in any Chinese restaurant.

Orestes
22nd October 2007, 01:53
I remember all of the above. Does anyone remember Belawan brandy? When I was on the Antenor '60,we loaded tobacco there. The Electrician and a couple of engineers got on this firewater, and the results were very messy indeed, infact the leckie was lucky not to have ended up blind(he was blind drunk) or with permanent liver damage

MikeK
22nd October 2007, 10:29
I've just moved my big aluminium steaming trunk up into the loft for storing whatever the good lady is hoarding (glances nervously over shoulder !) Bought in H.K in the 60's while in Jardines it has a shiny aly/metal covering and blue check lining with a big tray in the top and has the camphor smell still. With that company you carried your 'home' around with you on three year tours. When transferring ships all your heavy gear was off-loaded to the stores launch in H.K and stored in the company's godown, while you took a change of skiddies etc to wherever they had booked you in on the Kowloon side. Some of the old Jardine hands had acquired quite a lot of baggage over the years - the most notewothy I remember was a Ch. Mate who carried his own Mirror sailing dinghy around with him !
That was a much, much different life back then, for sure !!

Mike

makko
22nd October 2007, 16:14
Another BF staple - Bangkok silverware! Me and brother had used the old fellas to "dig in the garden" as children! I got the Gypsies warning to bring a "nice set for your mother"!

Rgds.

Dave

Bill Davies
22nd October 2007, 16:39
Remember something called 'Ginjui' (Gin) from Shanghai.

Tai Pan
22nd October 2007, 16:47
never did find out who broke my opium table . it was in the radio room on glengarry, i have my suspicions.

Trevorw
22nd October 2007, 17:18
You don't think it was me do you, John? I think it was the same fourth mate who nicked that chiming clock from a bar in Yokohama. If you remember, it had a pendulum and every time the ship rolled the sodding thing used to strike - and my cabin was next door!!!

Tai Pan
23rd October 2007, 13:45
No trev, i suspect the third mate who had his leg across one the passengers, remember he pushed against the auto alarm one night and stopped the motor, and the alarm went off, red faces when I dashed in naked. that put a stop to that little game. remember the clock, how he got it out of the bar is beyong me.

Tai Pan
23rd October 2007, 14:07
For those confused people, in holts if you were caught in passenger cabin it was deemed "broaching cargo" and was a dismissal offence. On Glengarry the radio room and my cabin were on the boat deck aft, no other accommodation near, trev and the others lived on the fore part of the boat deck. this made my cabin a good meeting place and of course I could not lock the radioroom at sea, so the 3rd mate used to sneak in for a bit. I was suspicious when my table got damaged ( was fixed by the chippie) but when he pushed her against the auto alarm, stopped the motor, all the bells rang including the bridge, did get some extra beer from him though.

makko
23rd October 2007, 16:17
AH rule,"Never go in a female's cabin alone!". It is strange how the BF culture comes back automatically. Also, how no one ever thinks of this, especially in these strange days we now live in!

BTW, what is an Opium table? My dad, along with his camphor chest, still has a small, low, rectangular carved table, with curved legs. It originally had a small drawer in the middle. He also has his carved bears, I believe from Hokkaido. I know that it was the very North of Japan and according to the Old Fella, freezing cold and snow bound. There are many tales about northern Japan, especially the bear cult and a tale that J.C. originated there!

Regards,

Dave

Trevorw
23rd October 2007, 20:17
No trev, i suspect the third mate who had his leg across one the passengers, remember he pushed against the auto alarm one night and stopped the motor, and the alarm went off, red faces when I dashed in naked. that put a stop to that little game. remember the clock, how he got it out of the bar is beyong me.

If I remember rightly, his name was Chris, from Sturminster Newton in Dorset. When he had over-imbibed he used to sing a song, "Be I Dorset, be I buggery, I do come from Wareham"

The kleptomaniac Fourth Mate was called Jones. His coup de grace was nicking a table, four chairs, and an entire four place settings from a nightclub in Nathan Road. He took them four floors down in the lift and set the whole thing up on the pavement in Nathan Road!

Those wre the days!!!

Trevorw
23rd October 2007, 20:21
What you described is exactly that - you have an opium table! They used to be available from mini to maxi. We've still got one!

makko
23rd October 2007, 20:36
Thanks Trevorw,

I live and learn!

My own "pipe dream" was to buy a huge dining table and chairs with mother-of-pearl inlay! However, Birkenhead was no more for Blueys and I was on the BBS run anyway, flying out to NY and on one occasion, HK (Trivia - I never joined a BF ship in the UK!).

A contemporary of mine who was on Bay boats, had a lively "import" sideline with chinese rugs!

Regards,

Dave

Tai Pan
23rd October 2007, 21:14
thats quite correct. when having a few in my cabin, I used to leave a gin and tonic on the fiddley deck above my cabin door, he used to amble down from the bridge along the fidley deck and remove the contents. the second mate was a bit femine if I remember. remember the sexual apperatus we nicked and kept in the safe.

Graham McMorine
16th February 2008, 21:54
Bill,

Do you remember Tsingtao beer? Now that's what I call a beer!

This velly fine beer can be bought in "NETTO" supermarkets along with another one most will remember, "TIGER BEER".

sparkie2182
16th February 2008, 22:39
asda also................

oceangoer
16th February 2008, 23:29
I believe from Hokkaido. I know that it was the very North of Japan and according to the Old Fella, freezing cold and snow bound.

BF used to go to Otaru quite frequently and load oak coffin boards for the UK. The carved wooden bear was the "souvenir" from that place.

Bill Davies
17th February 2008, 00:25
Otaru was my favourite port in Japan. The warm Sake drank from rectangular wooden cups with sugar around the rim was particularly nice. Memories of getting back to the ship through alleyways of snow sometimes several feet deep.

Hugh Ferguson
17th February 2008, 23:33
My first arrival in Otaru (Glenartney, 1949) was in snow with little or no visibility. We went to anchor and when I came back on watch at 8am. the weather had cleared to a beautiful sunny day. Looking shorewards I was amazed to see people skiing down a mountain! I had no idea that the Japanese skied.
Every time I went to Otaru we filled No.3 lower hold with Japanese oak (coffin boards so called)-sling fulls of loose planks, none packaged: imagine loading timber like that these days.

Trident
19th February 2008, 06:38
Hong Kong Baskets Like many others I also owned one of the so called Hong Kong Baskets, the only difference was mine was made for me in Singapore, The basket was cover with canvas by the ships Bosun, it was never painted but my name was penned on the top in very classical scroll by the talented 3rd engineer in Indian ink, the whole thing was then strengthened by a rope system comprising of miles of rope, complicated knots, and brass rings. Wonder where it is now.....Al

Peter Martin
21st February 2008, 14:08
Otaru was my favourite port in Japan. The warm Sake drank from rectangular wooden cups with sugar around the rim was particularly nice. Memories of getting back to the ship through alleyways of snow sometimes several feet deep.

Seem to remember being led to a bar called "The House of Nudes" - As the name implies it was a strip joint. Drinking Sapporro beer and getting an education!

Tai Pan
21st February 2008, 15:07
are you sure you have spelled education correctly!