The Wreck Albanian

TAZA
22nd October 2007, 19:08
Hi
Can you please help,I dived the wreck of the Albanian on Sunday and would like to know more about the wreck, It sank 18/11/1877 of the coast of North Wales
after a collision with the barque Nydia.
What type of ship was she,where was she from and going to.

Cheers

Colin

K urgess
22nd October 2007, 19:10
This (http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz/ship/show/143970) is a start in your quest for answers.

Cheers

melliget
22nd October 2007, 22:55
Colin.

Here's the initial report in The Times:

The Times, Monday, Nov 19, 1877
FATAL COLLISION.- Yesterday afternoon the
screw steamer Albanian and the bark Nydia were in colli-
sion off the Ormshead, and both vessels sank almost imme-
diately. Two of the Nydia's and one of the Albanian's
crew were lost. The steamer, which was of 918 tons
register, and belonged to Messrs. F. Leyland and Co.'s
Mediterranean fleet, sailed from Liverpool yesterday morn-
ing for Genoa and Leghorn, under the command of Captain
Lloyd. The Nydia, Captain Bury, 833 tons register, was
bound for Savannah. The ship's boats were smashed, but
the steamer's were not. Fortunately there were two steam-
tugs close at hand. The tug Black Prince proceeded
promptly to the assistance of the Nydia, while the tug
Great Emperor performed similar service to the Albanian.
The only aid that could be given, however, was to save
life. But for the presence of the steam tugs it is probable
a great loss of life would have resulted. The survivors
were disembarked at the landing stage at half-past 6 last
night.


regards,
Martin

melliget
22nd October 2007, 23:58
Colin.

I meant to ask, did you happen to see any wreckage of the Nydia on your dive on the Albanian seeing as they both sank?

Here's the postscript to the collision in the Wreck Commissioner's Court. You have to feel a little sorry for Captain Bury - the Nydia was his first ship.

The Times, Tuesday, Dec 11, 1877
WRECK COMMISSIONER'S COURT, LIVERPOOL
(Before Mr. H. C. ROTHERY, the Wreck Commissioner, with Assessors.)
THE ALBANIAN AND NYDIA
Commander Foster, R.N., and Captain Wilson were
Assessors.
The investigation into the disastrous collision off the
Great Ormes Head between the steamer Albanian and
the bark Nydia, with the loss of three lives and both
vessels, was concluded on Saturday last.
The COMMISSIONER, in delivering judgment, said it was
the duty of the Albanian to keep out of the way of the
Nydia. She might have done so by going ahead or astern;
she might have ported or starboarded. She adopted no
one of these courses. The Nydia kept her helm unchanged,
as it was her duty to do, and the collision was due entirely to
those on board the Albanian. The person in charge of the
deck of the Albanian was the third officer, who admitted
that he was in charge, and therefore the blame attached to
him for the collision. What excuse had he to give for what the
Court could not but call a wanton outrage? Literally none
at all. He told them that he could not starboard his helm
upon approaching the Nydia because he was too far
ahead of her; that he could not port because thereby he
would have brought his port open to her, and that his only
course was to go ahead at full speed and cross her course.
Could there be a more lamentable confession of folly and
incompetency? He held a master's certificate, and had
served as first mate; but it did not appear that he had
been degraded through any misconduct. The fact, how-
ever, remained that in this particular case he had grossly
misconducted himself. He had shown himself to be not
only unfit for command, but unfit for the position which
he held on board this vessel; and the only course which
was open to the Court was to cancel his certificate. The
learned Commissioner said he could not conclude his ob-
servations without stating that in the opinion of the Court
the captain of the Nydia throughtout the whole of the
transaction had behaved with great courage, which did
him great credit, and his conduct deserved especial praise.
He naturally felt very sore at having lost hist first ship,
but the Court trusted that his conduct on the occasion
would entitle him to some consideration on the part of his
present employers, or on the part of those who had become
acquainted with his conduct on this occasion. The Court
would not give costs against the owners or the third
mate of the Albanian.


regards,
Martin