Carriage of Grain in Tankers

tacho
28th October 2007, 19:49
I read recently that grain was sometimes carried in Oil Tankers. Is this true? And if so how where the tanks cleaned between cargos?

non descript
28th October 2007, 19:55
I have no direct knowledge from onboard, but yes, tankers did find themselves pressed into service for the carriage of grain, as it was not an impossible task to clean the tanks and load relatively clean and dry grain into relatively clean dry tanks. The idea was not to switch from Oil to Grain at a momentís notice, but more to follow a trend in the market and if the Freight Rate made the switch worthwhile, then it was commercial reasonable to move from Oil to Dry.

fred henderson
28th October 2007, 20:23
I remember a retired Shell Captain telling me that during WW2 he was appointed as Mate to a new tanker completing in Sunderland and they loaded fresh water for Gibraltar. He thought it was great as it took several weeks to fill the tanks from the town supply! He said that there were more servicemen and visiting ships in Gib than the water catchment system could supply and it was standard practice to use tankers that had not yet loaded oil.

Fred(Thumb)

non descript
28th October 2007, 20:28
The carriage of Fresh Water in tankers on their maiden voyages is echoed here (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=6975) where the Beauval performed such a trip.
Mark

Pilot mac
28th October 2007, 20:31
I was doubled up alongside a tanker in Karachi in 1975 and she was discharging grain. Cleaning I imagine could be a long job if done by hand but I would think a decent tank washing system may cope with the worst of it.

regards
Dave

demodocus
28th October 2007, 21:15
As I recall there was a whole class of vessels constructed in the 70's called OBO's (Ore Bulk Oil) with a view to eliminating the ballast leg or introducing a profitable 3rd leg in oil conracts. Mostly disappeared in the 80's.

tunatownshipwreck
28th October 2007, 21:19
I've seen a lot of oil tankers tie up for cleaning before loading grain, seems US tankers did this most often with foreign assistance grain. I don't know if there's a prohibition on chemical tankers carrying foodstuffs, but I have never known of any to do so.

treeve
28th October 2007, 21:51
My uncle was employed on a tanker in WW2 to take water to the North of France, the Americans considered it was that water that gave them the spirit.
The tanks were not cleaned out between oil and water transport apparently.

PollY Anna
28th October 2007, 23:14
Hi guys
I can add to the thread my first ship the Naess Endeavour 45.000 Tons (Naess Owned) (J & J Denholms Managed) Late 60's or early 70's date not known. She was chartered to take grain from the USA to Africa (I think Aid)
I found on a site an officer who sailed on her at this time and explained the long processes needed to clean the tanks. It entailed a long slow journey across the Atlantic while the tanks were cleaned, he told me that they all got a pat on the back as the tanks were so clean. Makes you think she would have had by that time at least 10 years of carrying Crude Oil from the middle east and the Gulf

Regards Ron

Steve Woodward
29th October 2007, 00:26
To answer the cleaning question, all tankers can use there cargo pumping system to wash their cargo tanks using water, usually sea-water.
This water in the days grain was carried would be taken direct from sea and heated by steam in the tank cleaning heater - basically a very similar principle to an electric shower but far more powerful, this water would then be used to wash the tanks using portable tank cleaning machines ( look up Butterworth / Victor Pyrate tank cleaning machines) the wash water would then be drained back to the slop tanks and decanted back to the sea, a process were water would overflow from one tank to another using up to three slop tanks with the oil carried over floating to the top, the water would be discharged from the botom of the final tank being reasonably clean.
After washing the tanks would be gas freed by blowing the tanks with air from either steam, air or water driven fans. Once safe for entry manual cleaning could be carried out.

Buoy
29th October 2007, 00:32
OBO's used to carry, as their name suggests, Oil, Bulk or Ore cargoes. The idea was to utilise the unprofitable leg when in ballast by converting the ship to carry a different cargo back to the next load port. A typical voyage would be, say, load crude oil in the Gulf, discharge in Europe; tank clean to possibly S America; load iron ore to Japan; tank clean to the Gulf; load oil... In P&O BSL we had many OBO's - Grafton, Heythrop, Eridge, Kildare, Jedforest, Lauderdale (the latter being O-O oil-ore only). Trips would involve intensive tank cleaning between carrying crude oil, coal, iron ore and grain. It was a huge work up to tank clean between a cargo change.

gdynia
29th October 2007, 04:17
Tacho
In the early 70,s the Americans loaded alot of old mothballed tankers with Grain to go to the Russian ports. I also saw the Manhattan loading Grain at Destrehan Grain Terminal in the Mississippi

Chouan
29th October 2007, 14:18
As I recall there was a whole class of vessels constructed in the 70's called OBO's (Ore Bulk Oil) with a view to eliminating the ballast leg or introducing a profitable 3rd leg in oil conracts. Mostly disappeared in the 80's.

I spent most of my "tanker" career on OBOs, late 70's to mid 80's. They didn't seem to be dying out at that point, mainly because of their flexibility. Oil market a bit flat? Load ore, or coal, or grain instead. The Derbyshire was one such.

DCMARINE
29th October 2007, 15:27
In 1965 I was Apprentice on a 27,000T Dwt tanker for 7 months and for most of that time we carried grain. Loaded through any tank opening and grain discharged by suction machines placed on deck. Main problem was from small fractures in the pipes in the tanks leaking condensation into the cargo at the bottom of tanks.
Donald Campbell

Skye Sierra
29th October 2007, 15:34
Hi guys
I can add to the thread my first ship the Naess Endeavour 45.000 Tons (Naess Owned) (J & J Denholms Managed) Late 60's or early 70's date not known. She was chartered to take grain from the USA to Africa (I think Aid)
I found on a site an officer who sailed on her at this time and explained the long processes needed to clean the tanks. It entailed a long slow journey across the Atlantic while the tanks were cleaned, he told me that they all got a pat on the back as the tanks were so clean. Makes you think she would have had by that time at least 10 years of carrying Crude Oil from the middle east and the Gulf

Regards Ron

I joined the Naess Endeavour in September 1971 just a few months after she carried her grain cargo - I think the 'Old Man' at the time was ED MacGregor - and most of the crew were still talking about the grain run. If memory serves me right I think it was from the States to Chittagong and they discharged onto barges. Despite all the tank cleaning during the months I was on her there was still grain clinging to the tank frames in the bits the Butterworth hoses couldn't reach!

johnalderman
29th October 2007, 15:37
before slop tanks the oil/water mix was just pumped straight overboard.

Bill Davies
29th October 2007, 15:56
Choun,

One has to be careful here to differentiate between OBOs and Ore/Oil carriers.
The former, as I am sure you are aware,being a far safer bet that the latter.

Brgds

Bill

Chouan
29th October 2007, 17:04
I must admit that when I sailed on the abortion that was the Kona we only carried oil, which was a, well disguised, blessing, given how many valves, lines and even bulkheads passed. On the other hand, because of our red ensign our safety survey at Sullom Voe was most perfunctory and we were "safe" to load, despite having oil in our segregated ballast tanks.

PollY Anna
29th October 2007, 17:45
Hi Skye Sierra

I was on her 10 years before your term and I have had a look at the e-mail that Angus sent me, it's an interesting story. He stated that it was around 1966 and he spent a long time on the ship with 4 skippers one of whom you mentioned. It's a small world.

Regards Ron.

John Cassels
30th October 2007, 09:18
Obo's were without doubt the worst ships I ever had to sail on.
Still have nightmares about steam cleaning waxy Venezualan crude off the
US coast getting ready to load coal at Norfolk Va. All 11 holds then stowing
all 11 sets of heating coils from the tank top up under the lids. Sounds easy
to talk about the operation in a few lines but the work load was unbelievable.

John.H.Clark
30th October 2007, 10:25
I have just added an old post card on grain to the life on board photos.

Would that be wharfies or crew leveling the cargo ?

Bill Davies
30th October 2007, 10:36
Obo's were without doubt the worst ships I ever had to sail on.
Still have nightmares about steam cleaning waxy Venezualan crude off the
US coast getting ready to load coal at Norfolk Va. All 11 holds then stowing
all 11 sets of heating coils from the tank top up under the lids. Sounds easy
to talk about the operation in a few lines but the work load was unbelievable.

John,
I would agree with you that OBOs were hard work and concurr that your brief description does not do justice to the work involved. However, OBOs were a safer alternative to Ore/Oil carriers where so often you could be loading/discharging Ore in vessels which were not Gas Free. Some of the practices of Gas freeing OBOs/Ore/Oil carriers I would be reluctant to go into print about.

Brgds

Bill

albert.s.i
30th October 2007, 11:53
hi lads, interesting thread, did? oil tankers carry grain yes they did but i believe because of the tanks having there own lids it was easy to pore graiin in and suck it out again and for what dreggs were left im sure the butterworth cleaning system would handle that strait over the stern just like ordinary tank cleaning cheers albert s i

non descript
30th October 2007, 13:13
Dom has kindly added an excellent picture here (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/86477) of the very thing that was asked originlaly by Tacho, and it shows with perfect clarity the concept of loading grain in a pure tanker.

John Cassels
30th October 2007, 15:43
John,
I would agree with you that OBOs were hard work and concurr that your brief description does not do justice to the work involved. However, OBOs were a safer alternative to Ore/Oil carriers where so often you could be loading/discharging Ore in vessels which were not Gas Free. Some of the practices of Gas freeing OBOs/Ore/Oil carriers I would be reluctant to go into print about.

Brgds

Bill


Bill , maybe this is the wrong thread as the original post was about loading
grain in tankers. Perhaps we should start an obo thread though I had hoped
that with the passing years I would have forgotten the name !.
Like yourself , I would rather forget some of the things we had to do to get
the job ready and very few of them were safe. How we ever got away
with many of them I still shudder to think about.

Bill Davies
30th October 2007, 15:48
Good idea!

John Crossland
31st October 2007, 01:21
I saw an American oil tanker discharging grain in Djibouti in 2000.
Don't know how they cleaned the tanks beforehand.

janmike
30th May 2012, 20:27
There was a certain V class Shell tanker off Karachi for many months in the
60's.

In the bad old days of the 50's the tankers which I served my time on had drums of caustic soda for cleaning out black oil from the tanks. Steam houses were lashed into each drum and the rest I leave to your imagination Mike

R58484956
4th June 2012, 10:35
Greetings hannvli and welcome to SN. Bon voyage.

Basil
4th June 2012, 11:34
Not quite on thread, but once had a cargo of grain in a tramp. Somehow our fuel, bunker C, became contaminated with cargo and I cleaned several filters, pulling out handfuls of stinking putrefying grain.

Waighty
9th July 2012, 12:35
I remember a retired Shell Captain telling me that during WW2 he was appointed as Mate to a new tanker completing in Sunderland and they loaded fresh water for Gibraltar. He thought it was great as it took several weeks to fill the tanks from the town supply! He said that there were more servicemen and visiting ships in Gib than the water catchment system could supply and it was standard practice to use tankers that had not yet loaded oil.

Fred(Thumb)

Back in the 1960s when Hong Kong was running dry nearly every Summer, the HK Gov't had 6 tankers on charter, many of them Dan Boats, running between the Pearl River and HK. According to the blurb at the time cleaning the tankers after each water season to return to oil carriage was a nightmare owing to the mud residues from the river water. Water from China produced about a 6th of the daily supply required. Where we lived (New Territories) we had water between 0200 and 0600 every fourth day!

At the time, so the tale goes, Americans living or visiting HK were required to leave a 6th of a glass of water in the glass to represent the contribution from China!

As a cargoship man I reckon being on a tanker only carrying water must have been heaven compared to hydrocarbons.

surfaceblow
10th July 2012, 13:42
I was on a tanker at Diego Garcia carrying water under a long term charter. We had to move the water around frequently, test and treat the water. At least we could weld on deck when ever the need required.

Joe

Somerton
10th July 2012, 14:50
I remember in the 1950,s a few tankers built in Belfast loaded water in Belfast for their trip to the West Indies. I cant say whether it was for ballast or discharge on arrival at the West Indies?

Alex C.

Colin Cooper
15th September 2012, 23:33
I was Deck Cadet with Silver Line, and sailed on the OBO, Arapaho, (ex Seto Bridge from memory) in 81/82. I joined in Rotterdam, and we headed for Teesport and picked up North Sea Light Crude for Philadelphia. Straight forward enough.Ater discharging in Philaelphia, it was down to New Orleans for grain to Hamburg.I remember doing 10 straight 16 hour days, cleaning for grain.
The first 5 involved keeping an eye on the tank washing system, whilst monitoring the level of oil in the slop tanks. Only the water in the slop tank was meant to go over the side, but thanks to a faulty gauge, during a night shift someone noticed a fairly large oil slick trailing from the starboard side. We ended up going in circles in the dark dropping detergent to break it up. I think we got away with it! After tank-washing, it only got worse. The tank lids were opened, and the tanks were vented before we were sent down with scrapers to remove the wax residues which had built up on the bulkheads. Due to the super-heated water in the tank washing system, the oil on the bulkheads of the tanks was broken down into the lighter compounds, which were handled by the ballast pumps, leaving a coating of wax about 5mm thick coating large areas of the tank.
On arrival in N/O, the inspectors failed us immediately for grain. They could see wax at the top of the tanks. Thankfully the Phillipino crew didn't have any fears about dangling 60' above the deck on a bosuns chair, trying to manipulate a 15' jury-rigged pole ( 3 broomhandles whipped together with a scraper on the end) whilst they were swung vigorously under the overhang of the tank, in order to get to the awkward bits of wax. A fully trained trapeze artist would have struggled to do what these guys did.
2nd Inspection....failed again. Much more "trapezery" required. The wax was like f*&^ing super glue!! We passed the 3rd inspection, which was real bummer. Had we failed again, pump-action shotguns were the next choice. Apparently they had been used to great effect on a ship two weeks earlier which had a similar issue with wax residues. According to the load master, the buck-shot would flatten on impact with the bulkhead, which would lift the residue off in sheets. This would have been infinitely more fun!.
The C/O, Gavin, bought a case for beer for us three cadets for our efforts over the 10 days, which we tanned in about 10 minutes. Unfortunately, my share kept "re-appearing" that night. Sick as dog.

Half way over the Atlantic, in a haevy storm, w wre avised that after discharging in Hamburg, we were to repeat the same trip.

I paid off in Hamburg forever!

ninabaker
16th September 2012, 00:49
Tacho
In the early 70,s the Americans loaded alot of old mothballed tankers with Grain to go to the Russian ports. I also saw the Manhattan loading Grain at Destrehan Grain Terminal in the Mississippi

Not a tanker, although I did my time in tankers, but I was 2/O on Dorsetshire bulk carrier which did two trips from New Orleans to Novorossysk in the Black Sea with maize. I think it was some sort of aid? in the mid 1970s.

At the USA end there was meticulous testing as the grain was supposedly for human consumption - a quart measure was taken and if there were more than so many rat hairs (yes really) per quart then the whole lot had to come out and start again.

When we got to Russia the whole lot was discharged straight into cattle trucks - no cleaning after the animals had left. I never knew if the grain was for animal feed or if the russians simply didnt care how filthy it got for their own people.

Only redeeming feature of Novorossysk was the nearby vineyards - amazing pink champagne.

Uricanejack
16th September 2012, 03:26
Way back when loading Grain in tankers made sense due to the tendancy of bulk grain to behave like a fluid. in the late 60s and early 70s. specialy designed bulk carriers which could carry grain in bulk without triming, straping or shifting boards were still a new idea. tankers being desined to carry liquid in bulk. did not have to wory about shifting cargoe. Also they were bigger could carry large cargoe. the additional cost involved in cleaning would have been cheeper than the costs of fitting shifting boards ect or parialy bagging saucering ect. to carry bulk grain in conventional bulk carrier.

the discharge would be by vacuvator out through tank opening including hatch and tank cleaning openings.

now the cost of this is unecanomic comparred to ships specificaly designed to carry grain in bulk.

ASDA inspection has allways been rigerous and still is prior to loading. holds or tanks will fail if any loos rust or scale, residue of previous cargoe incuding grains, bugs, ect.

oldman 80
17th September 2012, 06:12
I was Deck Cadet with Silver Line, and sailed on the OBO, Arapaho, (ex Seto Bridge from memory) in 81/82. I joined in Rotterdam, and we headed for Teesport and picked up North Sea Light Crude for Philadelphia. Straight forward enough.Ater discharging in Philaelphia, it was down to New Orleans for grain to Hamburg.I remember doing 10 straight 16 hour days, cleaning for grain.
The first 5 involved keeping an eye on the tank washing system, whilst monitoring the level of oil in the slop tanks. Only the water in the slop tank was meant to go over the side, but thanks to a faulty gauge, during a night shift someone noticed a fairly large oil slick trailing from the starboard side. We ended up going in circles in the dark dropping detergent to break it up. I think we got away with it! After tank-washing, it only got worse. The tank lids were opened, and the tanks were vented before we were sent down with scrapers to remove the wax residues which had built up on the bulkheads. Due to the super-heated water in the tank washing system, the oil on the bulkheads of the tanks was broken down into the lighter compounds, which were handled by the ballast pumps, leaving a coating of wax about 5mm thick coating large areas of the tank.
On arrival in N/O, the inspectors failed us immediately for grain. They could see wax at the top of the tanks. Thankfully the Phillipino crew didn't have any fears about dangling 60' above the deck on a bosuns chair, trying to manipulate a 15' jury-rigged pole ( 3 broomhandles whipped together with a scraper on the end) whilst they were swung vigorously under the overhang of the tank, in order to get to the awkward bits of wax. A fully trained trapeze artist would have struggled to do what these guys did.
2nd Inspection....failed again. Much more "trapezery" required. The wax was like f*&^ing super glue!! We passed the 3rd inspection, which was real bummer. Had we failed again, pump-action shotguns were the next choice. Apparently they had been used to great effect on a ship two weeks earlier which had a similar issue with wax residues. According to the load master, the buck-shot would flatten on impact with the bulkhead, which would lift the residue off in sheets. This would have been infinitely more fun!.
The C/O, Gavin, bought a case for beer for us three cadets for our efforts over the 10 days, which we tanned in about 10 minutes. Unfortunately, my share kept "re-appearing" that night. Sick as dog.

Half way over the Atlantic, in a haevy storm, w wre avised that after discharging in Hamburg, we were to repeat the same trip.

I paid off in Hamburg forever!

(Thumb)
Hey ! Hey ! I quite like your account of the tank cleaning, which in fact suggests to me, that your loss to the Merchant Navy was very sad in a way, although as things turned out during the years following your departure you would probably have been made redundant in any case.
It seems you do of course realise/understand why you had the wax problem, which for a cadet, is pretty good in my view and I suppose is the main reason I say your loss to the industry was certainly greater to it, than it was to you.
A few more tank cleans with that basic understanding - and you have become an expert quite quickly - in my view.
I think you'd have made an excellent O.B.O. and Tanker c/o then Master ( with the passage of time) - had you so chosen.
Good posting - well done.
You've just impressed me - and that's not the easiest of things to do.(*))

P.S. it appears your vessel may not have been utilising Crude Oil Washing - 1981/ 1982 era - OBO - that is very likely, me thinks.

sidsal
17th September 2012, 14:54
Not quite revelant perhaps but an anecdote. In 1944 I sailed in Brocklebanks Fort Camosun ( Canadian ww2 build) from Baltimore to Port Said with a full cargo of munitons. After discharge we apprentices had to crawl through the double bottom tanks , scrape the rust off and cement wash them = also the deep tanks. We then loaded fresh water and a fire pump was put aboard and we sailed to Safaja on the Red Sea. Safaja is now a major Egyptian port with lots of cruise ships visiting where passengers are bussed the 300 miles to Luxor to see the sights.
When Rommel was within 60 miles of the Suez Canal the Allies sought the nearest deep water place to carry on if the canal fell and Safaja was chosen. It was then deserted except for a single berth where phosphates were loaded. A dredger was sent from Suez and it was promptly sunk by bombers. A garrison of Royal Engineers started to build wharves and a road across the mountains to Luxor ( now used for tourists).
When we went there the panic was over and the water was for the small garrison remaining. As there was ship loading phosphates we anchored for a couple of weeks and had a great time exploring the reefs. There was a steam train bringing the phosphates from the hills and we used to cadge a lift on the locomotive which was driven by Gyppos in their flowing robes and long beards.
Happy days.

Colin Cooper
18th September 2012, 23:23
(Thumb)
Hey ! Hey ! I quite like your account of the tank cleaning, which in fact suggests to me, that your loss to the Merchant Navy was very sad in a way, although as things turned out during the years following your departure you would probably have been made redundant in any case.
It seems you do of course realise/understand why you had the wax problem, which for a cadet, is pretty good in my view and I suppose is the main reason I say your loss to the industry was certainly greater to it, than it was to you.
A few more tank cleans with that basic understanding - and you have become an expert quite quickly - in my view.
I think you'd have made an excellent O.B.O. and Tanker c/o then Master ( with the passage of time) - had you so chosen.
Good posting - well done.
You've just impressed me - and that's not the easiest of things to do.(*))

P.S. it appears your vessel may not have been utilising Crude Oil Washing - 1981/ 1982 era - OBO - that is very likely, me thinks.
Thanks for your comments. You are quite correct in that redundancy lay just a a year or so down the road. We had all been told on completion of Phase 1 at college. I decided to go for as much sea time as possible, in order to have the chance to travel before it all came to an end. In all honesty, despite the last 30 years, I still miss it.
Regarding your comments as to my understanding of the wax problem, I shall be forever grateful to my O Grade chemistry teacher for the lesson on the distillation of crude oil, and its constituent compounds. It was probably this one experiment that scraped me a C pass in 1979.
The shotgun solution was absolutely real, and myself and the two other cadets were like kids waiting for Xmas, hoping that Santa, in the form of the C/O, was going to supply us with some heavy weaponry. What a let down.
I sailed on 6 ships during my time with Silver Line and all were different. Despite having the benefit of the Owners cabin to live in, during my 3 months on board, I would place this ship as 5th out of the 6, in terms of enjoyment. We weren't far off being slave labour. I think the term used these days is "character-building." Even so, the one thing I have said to many people about the MN as a career over many years is that, I may have gone to some fabulous places, and never got to see them, however I also went to many s***holes, where I have had the best laughs of all time.
Unforgettable memories which are highly treasured.

Thanks again and Kind Regards.

Colin

oldman 80
19th September 2012, 00:40
Colin,
Hi once again.
Your comment re your lessons in O grade chemistry - does indeed say it all.
As I previously suspected your loss to the industry was enormous.
Your latest posting has more than confirmed that so far as I am concerned.
There's no doubt now that O grade chemistry should be made compulsory for tanker endorsements.
"Character Building", well maybe, but I preferred to view it as learning through practical experience - at grass root level.
It is persons like you who made seafaring so very pleasureable, (despite all the hardships) - in my view - and there were many like you.
I miss them - believe me.
A way of life, - more so than just a job.
A fine generation, so they were.
Good luck and best wishes.
(Thumb)

John Owens
2nd December 2012, 09:26
I was on a tanker at Diego Garcia carrying water under a long term charter. We had to move the water around frequently, test and treat the water. At least we could weld on deck when ever the need required.

JoeJoe, I assume you're referring to the Mormac Star. Wasn't life grand on Diego Garcia? I was Ch Eng on the Letitia Lykes for a time on DG. Were you with Allen Dowler on the Star? Somehow he and I wound up relieving each other on the Letitia before she left DG in '88.

surfaceblow
2nd December 2012, 20:38
Yes, I was on the Mormac Star with Allen Dowler in beautiful Diego Garcia. At least on the water tanker we were anchored closer to the dock, not like when I was on the ammo ships in an earlier repast.

Allen would get bored in the office and would report to the engine room for his work assignment for the day. I never got use to giving Al a work assignment the last time I saw him before getting the relief job on the Star was when he was the Admin Assistant of the Calhoon School.

Joe

John Owens
2nd December 2012, 22:43
Yeah, I remember Allen from Calhoon also. Were you in the cadet program? I graduated in group 29A when it was still a 2 yr program.

Your story about assigning Allen work in the engine room fits him to a tee. He was famous around Lykes Bros. for designating his 1st A/E to run a USCG inspection while he and the wiper did brick work inside a boiler. A port engr. told me Allen would poke his head out of the burner register every few hours to ask if everything was okay. Hehe!

As far as Diego Garcia, I kinda enjoyed it. Except for the flights to and from, it was easy duty. Unlike some companies, Lykes never cut the manning or the wages on the Letitia for DG duty. Just keep the ship on charter and they were happy. In fact, they preferred not to hear from you at all.

surfaceblow
3rd December 2012, 00:54
I graduated in Group 47 in 1975. I was also on the Star in 1980 and again in 1986. I think we were on the Swedish Coast wise trade the first time I was on the Star. Delivering home heating oil.

Joe

marinemec2004
3rd December 2012, 04:48
Rapana was 223,000 DWT of hassle!
What a work upthis vessel was..
I was pump man aboard her.
I joined in france and after discharging an oil cargo, we went into tank cleaning mode - 6on 6 off ( Me and the C/O.) for 18 straight days!
She was a handfull thats for sure.
Onto Brazil for a cargo of Ore for Japan. 59 days -slow steaming fromBrazil to Japan.
Rapana was plagued with troubles. Look up the thread for these vessels . Few guys got killed on her, ( pumproom explosion)
The whole clas of these vessels was floored

R904444
3rd December 2012, 23:41
I joined the Naess Endeavour in September 1971 just a few months after she carried her grain cargo - I think the 'Old Man' at the time was ED MacGregor - and most of the crew were still talking about the grain run. If memory serves me right I think it was from the States to Chittagong and they discharged onto barges. Despite all the tank cleaning during the months I was on her there was still grain clinging to the tank frames in the bits the Butterworth hoses couldn't reach!

I was on her in as J/E 1974 when she was the Burmah Cameo - we discharged oil in Martinez , San Francisco, then tank cleaned at sea. We then got orders to head to Portland Oregon and spent 3 weeks alongside tank cleaning prior to loading grain at both Portland and Longview for Inchon. This was discharged at buoys into barges by potable diesel evacuators and also took 3 weeks.

When I first heard about the grain cargo I thought it was a wind up but one of the other engineers told me he had been on her years ago when she carried grain - he was correct - can't remember his name unfortunately.

Andy McArthur

frank fish
4th December 2012, 11:13
To change over from oil to grain cargo it was nec- essary to wash the tanks with hot water and possibly chemicals then take out all the remaining sludge and rust scale by hand.Then strum boxes of 100cubic ft made of heavy timber had to be constructed around the main suctions these then had to be covered with burlap to prevent the grain getting in.Additional sounding pipes made from flexible drain pipe then had to be fitted to both for'd and after ends of the tanks.Lastly all oily greasy residue on the steel had to be padded with lime or cement powder. Not a job for the faint hearted as all this could take about three weeks on an old 18000tonner with a willing crew