Memories of Colombo

ken carr
29th October 2007, 14:16
Colombo I believe would have been one of the most popular ports on the Brocklebank run, always lots to do and many interesting places to visit. My longest visit to this great city ( six and half weeks ) was the only visit that I hardly got ashore, most of the time we where tied up in the middle of the harbour,unfortunatly Ceylon in the late fifties was having Tamil problems and the Mahanada arrived just as Marshall Law was declared. In the evenings we would sit on deck and listen to the noise of riots in the "Petter". obviously shore side was not a healthy place to be.
With great assistance from the Colombo Dock Police we managed to organize Inter-Ship football matches, they would escort us to the Dry Dock area then supply us with a couple of armed guards who would walk round the pitch and keep an eye on us, and enjoy a good laugh at our antics the results of these games was not a big deal,good exercise and a party to follow.
On returning from a game we find that a ship has entered the Dry Dock none other than HMS Loch Fyne, so we challenged them to a game The big day arrived, we fronted with our armed escort and were stunned, they looked like Liverpool FC, perfect red and white strip red and white hooped socks, Immaculate each and everyone, combined team of sailors and marines,so we prepared, no two players wore the same though three had football boots, the Back Alley Diddlers 2nd team Gentlemen we had a great game and a fantastic party aboared the Mahanada afterwards the Pursers Dept excelled themselves served up Fish & Chips in newspaper Sent them home full of Tennents, Barclay Perkins, and a few Cotta Pegs.
Unfortunatly Im not allowed to inform you of the match result untill next year Im sure you would not want me to embarrass Her Majesty's Grey Funnel Line
Now come all you Brocklebankers lets hear all about your Columbo visits
Regards
Ken Carr Talk about " Couth " ???

Philthechill
29th October 2007, 18:01
Ken! Salaams!
The Seychelles was one of my favourite places, but I was lucky having been there on half-a-dozen seperate occasions. whilst some long-serving blokes in Brock's never went at all!
However you're wanting stories about Colombo!
I recall one particular time when George Symmonds (C/O) had pulled-off some particularly lucrative deal when we were on "Makrana" in, I think, 1964.
We were anchored out in the middle harbour which meant, of course, getting the water-taxi's to-and-from the ship when we wanted to go ashore/return.
George decided that he would take his boozing buddies (Jim Robertson [Elect], Ted Hannah [Chief Steward], Pete Evans [2nd Steward], Joe Arden [Carpenter] and myself [J3/E]) for a meal ashore. However we weren't going to go to any old place for said meal! Oh no! George decided that the place to go was to "The Galle Face Hotel", probably THE most up-market place you could go in Colombo.
We all got suitably dressed-up in our best bib-and-tucker, suits, white shirts, ties-----------the whole nine yards!! George looking particularly impressive in a new sharkskin suit he'd had run-up in Calcutta the previous trip (again from the proceeds of some good deal he'd managed to pull-off!!).
The food and drink prices at "The Galle Face" were absolutely horrendous but George, having pulled-off the highly lucrative deal mentioned earlier, wasn't worried in the slightest, bidding us to eat, drink and be merry!!!!!
Which we did!!!!
By the time we had worked our collective way through quite a lot of VERY expensive blackmarket whisky we were all feeling no pain whatsoever and, eventually, decided to return to the ship.
We arrived back at the jetty and waited for a water-taxi with George, still carrying a glass of some kind of grog, entertaining all-and-sundry with an off-key rendition of some partisan (Scottish!!!!) song or other, much to the amusement of some Japanese, German and French blokes who were also waiting for the taxi.
When the taxi arrived all hands went inside with the exception of we Brocklebank worthies who opted to stand on the after-end!
No sooner had we got "Full-away", from the quayside, than George did a graceful parabola off the poop and landed amongst all kinds of 'orrible debris floating in the water!!! Naturally he was being protected by that wonderful God, who looks after drunken seamen, and he instantly surfaced big, beaming, grin on his face and still clutching the glass!!!!
The taxi halted whilst George was helped back on board, his beautiful sharkskin suit, streaked with fuel-oil and absolutely knackered!!!!!
We got back on board and headed for Ted's cabin "for a nightcap" with George instantly disappearing, the moment we got to Ted's cabin, to reappear ten minutes later immaculate in fresh whites and ready for the fray once more!!!!!!
A memorable night which happened over 40 years ago but which is still fresh, in my mind, as the night it all happened!
E-e-e-e-e-e-e-e swing that lamp!!!!!
Salaams,(Hippy) Phil

gwzm
29th October 2007, 20:39
'Twas on the Mahronda in 1964 and turning into the voyage from hades. We arrived off Colombo with a deck-cargo of dried fish - more about that later. For reasons that I don't recall after all this time, there were no berths available in the harbour so we spent six weeks swinging round the hook outside on full watches in a horrendous swell.
The 2/O, Derek Peters, aka Peter Gee because of his swarthy complexion, was a guitar player of some note(!)... so the Mahronda band was formed, led by the aforesaid Derek and consisting of a motley assortment of home made instruments conjured up out of bits of pipe & brasso tins, a tea-chest one-string base, a jalousy in lieu of a washboard, and assorted gash buckets etc for drums. Band practice was religiously held each evening after dinner, usually on top of number three hatch.
During this time the deck cargo of fish started to rot and smell something awful along with huge fat maggots crawling out of it. Eventually that had to be dumped, as I recall. That event was recorded in the lyrics of a song written by Derek about the voyage, most of which I've now forgotten, that included the line "gassed to death by rotting fish and goshell'd by the dools" - a passing reference to our personal shopper in Calcutta aka "the Ghost".
Eventually the great day arrived and we were able to get ashore. Shortly afterwards arrangements were made for the band to "play a gig" at the Colombo swimming club. There were several other Brocklebank ships in Colombo at the same time and word about the gig swiftly spread. A great time was had by all, accompanied by vast consumption of Newareliya Ale, the local brew. Needless to say the following morning included a long parade of folks with sore heads looking for the hair of the dog or exiting rapidly in search of the nearest lavatory.
It was all part of the Brocklebank experience and certainly has stuck in my memory.

All the best,

gwzm/John

Nick Jones
29th October 2007, 21:26
Does anyone remember a "Chinese" resteraunt in Colombo that was in a house that had purportedly belonged to some diplomat who had killed his wife. the food was wonderful, particularly the Crabs Claws in Ginger Sauce and the Chilli Prawns. When on the Matra in 69/70 we would go there after a couple of hours in the GOH drinking Gin and fresh limes. Sometimes in a taxi (Usually without brakes) or Rickshaws. I quite clearly remember being in a taxi with a sunroof and one of the lads hanging out of beating the roof of another taxi carrying the rest of the gang and going past a policeman who just smiled and shrugged his shoulders.
Good times.

Cheers,
Nick Jones

Cunarder
5th November 2007, 02:18
Yes Nick - I seem to recall partaking of the chilli crab at a "restaurant" on the road south in Bambalapitiya whilst there in '68/'69 on the Mawana. Can't for the life of me remember the name of the place though. However, I do remember the chilli crab being "thermonuclear" on the chilli scale.....

Cheers
Alan Marsden (R/O)

Kiwi Mike
5th November 2007, 03:30
We used to go to a night club called Cockfosters, 1970's. Late in the evening the whole place would start to shake and a bloody great big train and carriages would rumble by.
Great times.

pilot
5th November 2007, 07:22
Does anyone remember a "Chinese" resteraunt in Colombo

Nick, might have been called the Lighthouse, or it was in this area?
Cheers Martin.

Tony Selman
5th November 2007, 09:59
I too remember the restaurant vividly in every respect except the name! The crabs claws were quite wonderful and to this day I don't think I have tasted better. I recall the place being a couple of miles from the dock gate so it was a short taxi ride.

Philthechill
5th November 2007, 10:22
I too remember the restaurant vividly in every respect except the name! The crabs claws were quite wonderful and to this day I don't think I have tasted better. I recall the place being a couple of miles from the dock gate so it was a short taxi ride.
Tony! Wasn't it near the swimming-club? I seem to remember it as being in that vicinity. However the Chinese restaurant I DO remember, with great affection (and salivating mouth) was "The Waldorf" in Russell Street in Cal. The crab and asparagus soup was absolutely brilliant!!!! Excuse me whilst I go and change me shirt---------I've drooled all over it!!! Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

pilot
5th November 2007, 10:56
Asked a Sri Lankan pilot friend about the Colombo Chilli Crab restaurant and recd. the following from him.

Quote.
Yes, I vaguely remember the incident involving the diplomat and a Mdme Bhoonwatt or some Thai woman - It was ages ago, and it did make big news -in the sleepy old place that Colombo used to be, not a lot else happened in those days I guess!
I think the Chinese that was really close to the Port, in the Fort itself, just by the famous clock tower, was called Peking something, there was Lotus hotel close to the embassy where this murder took place, and the Chinese Dragon also - sorry can't be more accurate than that at the moment, will let u know if it comes to me(its a senior state of mind I'm afraid)
Unquote.

Tony Selman
5th November 2007, 11:38
Phil, as much as the ageing grey cells can recall I am inclined to believe that Pilot's Sri Lankan friend is closer to where I remember it. Had it been near the swimming club I think I might have recalled it more geographically. I just have a vague recollection of getting in a taxi near the gates and heading towards the left rather than the right which would have been the way to the swimming club.

On my first two trips on Matra in 64/65 we were there for so long we considered applying for permanent residency and we became such fans that we used to send people ashore for a take away even when we were on the buoys. As I was a chota marconi sahib at the time this task fell to me a couple of times and the restaurant was sufficiently switched on with it's packaging that the food was still quite warm when I got back.

I could certainly do some damage to those crabs claws for lunch today.

Derek Roger
6th November 2007, 01:27
The Chinese Resturant was somewhere between the Swimming Club and The Galle Face Hotel . My first trip to sea 1965 saw a great meal there .

The seafood was superb but the " speciallty of the house was fried chicken livers and cashu nuts .

I still cook this toady as it is terrific and very difficult to screw up !! Just dont overdo the livers and use lots of bamboo shoots and bean sprouts ( Again donts over cook or you will have a mess )

Philthechill
6th November 2007, 07:00
The Chinese Resturant was somewhere between the Swimming Club and The Galle Face Hotel . My first trip to sea 1965 saw a great meal there .

The seafood was superb but the " speciallty of the house was fried chicken livers and cashu nuts .

I still cook this toady as it is terrific and very difficult to screw up !! Just dont overdo the livers and use lots of bamboo shoots and bean sprouts ( Again donts over cook or you will have a mess )
Derek! Is "toady" your personal name for fried chicken livers and cashew nuts? (He asked pedantically!) Tee Hee! Salaams Phil(Hippy)

Tony Selman
6th November 2007, 10:31
Well that's two votes for near the swimming club so I bow to that one.

Derek Roger
6th November 2007, 15:51
Derek! Is "toady" your personal name for fried chicken livers and cashew nuts? (He asked pedantically!) Tee Hee! Salaams Phil(Hippy)

No Phil toady Im making Moose Pies . Derek

ken carr
7th November 2007, 11:05
Yes gentlemen I do re-call a great Chinese Restaurant in Colombo,it was in fact my first introduction to both Crab and Crayfish, absolutly mouth watering.yes another very happy memory of life with Brocks. I shall now proceed to make you jealous. At that time of my life I never thought that I would live on the shores of the Indian Ocean well for the last forty years I have made my home just south of Perth in West Australia a place called Rockingham about, 5Ks south is the seaside resort of Mandurah, well known for its Blue Manna Crabs, as today is my 73rd birthday I shall be dining at one of the many restaurants that dish up these wonderful sea creatures and eat as many as I can, going to make a pig of myself, eat your heart out Brocklebanker's yum yum, don't care if I am ill tomorrow
Ken Carr

Tony Selman
7th November 2007, 13:14
Many happy returns Ken and I hope you have a wonderful birthday. You live in a great part of the world and it sounds as if you are going to have a tremendous meal. I for one am extremely envious of you eating crab in a lovely place like that. Ah well, back to the nostalgia on this board!

Derek Roger
7th November 2007, 14:06
Allan Atack ( Brocklebanks ) was a great provider of crayfish in Colombo . His fishing spot was of the rocks at the swimming club and his method although somewhat novel was very productive .
He would swim along the rocks just after dark with an inner tube with net fitted which was tethered to his waist by a length or rope .
He used a torch ( flashlight ) which was made watertight by encapsulating the thing in a condom with a suitable knot . His other hand was protected by an engine room glove .
Shine the torch until you see the crayfish eyes ! Pick it out of its hole with glove and place in the suspended net . Repeat until net full then back to the club for a feed .
Considering sharks ; not a method for the faint hearted .

Regards Derek

Harry Nicholson
7th November 2007, 23:49
Hello Ken. Happy birthday to you and take care with the seafood.
The Chinese place I recall in Colombo was the Waldorf but the only thing I remember about it was the wonderful food the like I've not experienced since. I was impressed when the crabs came. The claws hung over the side of the plate and we were provided with little hammers to deal with the claws and carapaces.
The sharks fin soup was gorgeous. Ah well...memories eh? I've been vegetarian now for about 20 years.

Cunarder
8th November 2007, 06:35
I'm going to vote for "The Lotus" - I'm positive that's the place I'm thinking of....

Alan Marsden

raybnz
8th November 2007, 07:34
My memories of Colombo was during a visit on the MV Waipawa in 1965. We went ashore to a night club not sure where now but the Morris 1000 taxi had about 1 1/2 turns of slack in the steering wheel. The steaks we were served were round with a hole in the centre . My thoughts the steaks were made up from a elephants trunk.

Then there was a rickshaw ride back to the docks.The guys pulling them were old enough to be my grandfather. How they ever controlled the rickshaw has always amazed me especially with a couple of slightly drunk engineers in the back.

The ferry rowboats that took out to the ship had but only a few inches of free board no lights and rowing about with rather large ships passing close by. To help relieve the nerves there carved into the stern was the official number of passengers to be carried. Many more than we had on board.

There was a uproar when one of the thunder boxes the carpenter had rigged over the ships side disappeared complete with the local worker into the tide. From memory a couple of ABs had just checked the lashings were okay as well. Worked stopped for a few hours.

Philthechill
8th November 2007, 09:17
Hello Ken. Happy birthday to you and take care with the seafood.
The Chinese place I recall in Colombo was the Waldorf but the only thing I remember about it was the wonderful food the like I've not experienced since. I was impressed when the crabs came. The claws hung over the side of the plate and we were provided with little hammers to deal with the claws and carapaces.
The sharks fin soup was gorgeous. Ah well...memories eh? I've been vegetarian now for about 20 years.Harry! Salaams! I thought The Waldorf was in Russell Street in Calcutta. See my posting earlier on this thread. Phil(Hippy)

Tony Sprigings
8th November 2007, 09:18
Definitely inside the Fort, as the Pilot said.

Tony Selman
8th November 2007, 10:12
What is becoming obvious is that there were several Chinese restaurants in Colombo, which is hardly surprising in a city that size although how much local custom they got I have no idea. It is equally obvious that they all seemed to have a speciality of crabs claws and that their taste has been unsurpassed over the years. That is one thing we all agree upon and one thing our grey cells have not failed us on. (Thumb)

Nick Jones
9th November 2007, 09:11
Directions to the "Chinese restauraunt in question as my seriously depleted grey matter tells are:- From outside the GOH facing the docks go left, then left again. As far as I can remember those were the only turns and the restauraunt was on the left hand side of the road.

Cheers,

Nick Jones

Tony Sprigings
9th November 2007, 11:56
Nick,
That's the one I remember, but I am talking 1958 so maybe they proliferated.
Cheers,
Tony

ken carr
9th November 2007, 12:39
Many thanks to Shipsnostalgia and the many members who wished me a happy birthday on the 7th, and yes I had a great feed of Crabs thank you very much, now back to Colombo. Gentlemen it appears that all we did in this great city was EAT?? What about the Swimming Club, The Zoo, Mount Lavinia Gardens, or the beautifull City of Kandy, or a trip down to Galle, did anybody ever have beer or a Chotta Peg at the G O H, one of the few places in the world in those days that you would meet somebody that you knew if you stayed a while, I most certainly did, only been there a few short hours and got to the stage that I could not scratch myself when I met a well known Brocklebank Skipper, unfortunatly he was was Captain of my ship the Mahanada. Once again Im in more trouble than a Pregnant Nun
Stay Happy
Ken Carr

gwzm
9th November 2007, 19:37
Ken,

I certainly did more than eat in Colombo. We used to visit Mount Lavinia quite regularly and I still have a few souvenirs like a silver salver shaped like Ceylon, tortoiseshell and silver cufflinks. I also have a table lamp carved from solid mahogany with a base shaped like Ceylon with an elephant, matchbox holder and a small ashtray shaped like an elephants foot, which sits on a nest of tables in our living room.

The zoo was OK for a short visit but it always seemed "tired".

I had one particularly memorable trip to Kandy with visits to Newarelyia and Dimbula on the way and the Ruhunu game reserve on the way back. Unfortunately our Kota Wallah minibus (converted Morris Commercial van) ran over a native's bicycle in one of the villages. The bus was impounded and the driver put in jail. We found our way back to Colombo on one of the native buses shared with the local populace who seemed highly amused at our presence.

I still have photos somewhere which I could scan if anyone is interested.

It was all part of the Brocklebank experience and certainly left a lasting impression of a world now lost forever.

Happy days indeed.

gwzm/John

Roger Bentley
10th November 2007, 19:08
I suppose most of us bought postcards while in Colombo. here are two of Mount Lavinia - they are marked copyright Ceylon Pictorials, but after fifty odd years I suspect that has expired. If not I give them full credit. Hope they bring back some memories. I did do a memorable trip up along the coast with three other Brocklebank officers, one was the Mate, the other the Purser Ch/Stwd and the driver of our hire car was James Helmsley Scott Watson the Ch Sparks of their ship, I was on the Magdapur or Masirah at the time. Sadly I cannot remember the other names. We called at Hambantota, and other coastal places. Hoping to stay at the government rest houses there but finally finishing up in the GOH at Galle, where we each had gigantic rooms big enough to hold a ball in, sleeping under mosquito nets while the huge ceiling fans sifted layers of whitewash gently down on to the netting.
This hotel was really out of the glory days of empire!. Salaams, Roger

Philthechill
10th November 2007, 21:55
I've put a photo of the "Valiant Enterprise" in the "Cargo vessels" slot on the Gallery if anyone's interested. Salaams, Phil(Hippy)
Whoops! I've just realised! It would have been more appropriate on the Memories of Colombo thread wouldn't it? So if any of you Moderator whiz-kids could move it for me I shall be forever in your debt (he said grovellingly)

K urgess
10th November 2007, 22:25
Moved it for you Phil.
Promise me you'll buck up(LOL)

Philthechill
11th November 2007, 06:54
Moved it for you Phil.
Promise me you'll buck up(LOL) Marconi sahib! Burra salaams! I really am trying (any comments along the lines of "More like VERY trying" will be met with the aloof disdain they warrant) to get a grip but I'm a big believer in the opposite of "slowly, slowly catchee monkey" so it's all hell and no notion, on whatever project I decide I'm about to embark on, and then I realise----------too late inevitably--------that if I'd just slowed down and gave it (whatever "it" being) some considerate thought the knees of my (metaphoric, of course!!) strides wouldn't be permanently worn-out, where I'm perpetually on them, as I grovel, yet again, to a more switched-on person than myself to right my wrong! Toodle-pip! Phil(Hippy) P.S. Oh yes! I'm a firm believer,too, in my own credo:- "Why use one word when 10,000 are even better!" Hence all the waffle above!!!!!

Keith Adams
13th November 2007, 08:24
I do recall going to the swim club on one occasion but do not recall eating anywhere other than at the Mission To Seamen ... they took a van load of us up to Kandy to visit the temple there, and also a visit to a tea plantation ... great stuff ! I was in Colombo on a number of trips during the many months port strike when there were about 50 ships at anchor/moorings inside the breakwater and an equal number anchored outside ... there was a Prince Line ship on a charter that had been waiting over 3 months to unload ... and its enterprising crew made money as boatmen with one of their ship's lifeboats until it was holed by a rock. The Prime Minister was assassinated during that period, which didn't help matters ... anyone remember how long the strike lasted or, better yet, have a photo of the massed ships ... nothing like it since a WWII Halifax convoy assembly. Regards, Snowy

ken carr
13th November 2007, 12:57
John, Roger, Great stories just as I remember on my many visits to, Colombo
Your statement John " It was all part of the Brocklebank experience that left a lasting impression of a world now lost forever" how very very true,please post your photo's as we are all interested. Gentlemen I firmly believe that the world was far larger, and very much more friendly and safer place to travell in our time than the present day, I think we lived our younger days in safer times
Now can anybody re-call a night club on the outskirts of Colombo with a resident American Jazz pianist, he is known as one of the all time greats of the Jazz world I'm sure I know his name however I would like another opinion just to make sure that I have not lost the plot
Stay Happy
Ken Carr

Roger Bentley
13th November 2007, 14:20
Ken, I remember the club - you took a taxi to it. There was indeed a pianist and a very tired sort of night club act or two. They also sold a hideous gin called Rockland. It was more or less like lighter fuel and its effects were dire. Still we were young then! Regards, Roger

Don A.Macleod
13th November 2007, 15:29
On the left and left again Nick I agree,near the Post Offce, wasn't it called the Great Wall? Donald.

KIWI
13th November 2007, 20:13
In P&O we were in & out the same day so did not get a chance to sightsee but my enduring memory of Colombo is the ancient tonnage at anchor around the harbour.Once there was even a "Turret" type ship. Kiwi

Roger Bentley
14th November 2007, 14:13
This is another of the Ceylon Pictorial post cards, by the look of the cars it must have been in the 1950s. It features Millers the high class emporium. All the major cities in the middle and far east seemed to have one top of the range shop in those days, in Singaore it was Robinsons I think, and in Hong Kong when I was there it was Lane Crawfords. Acknowledgement made to Ceylon Pictorials if their copyright is still in force. Salaams

Philthechill
14th November 2007, 15:18
I've put a photo of Victoria gardens on the Ports & harbours section in t'Gallery. Plus a photo of the entrance to Port Sudan. Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

A.G.Greenwood
14th November 2007, 21:53
This is another of the Ceylon Pictorial post cards, by the look of the cars it must have been in the 1950s. It features Millers the high class emporium. All the major cities in the middle and far east seemed to have one top of the range shop in those days, in Singaore it was Robinsons I think, and in Hong Kong when I was there it was Lane Crawfords. Acknowledgement made to Ceylon Pictorials if their copyright is still in force. Salaams

Was it Millers or was the name Cargills?
Salaams
Tony Greenwood

Philthechill
15th November 2007, 09:18
Away from the rose-tinted thoughts of Chinese restaurants, and balmy days at Mount Lavinia, does anyone remember the days which gave rise to the saying, "Six day's shalt thou labour and, on the seventh, thou shalt shift ship"?
We would be alongside Walkers quay, loading tea and rubber, and then we would be told a "Bluey" was coming in (always, but always on a Sunday) and they ("Blue-flue") had precedence over all other companies and, therefore, we would have to "shift ship".
Inevitably it would have to be a "main steam shift" which, on the Scotch-boilered ships, was a real pain-in-the-bum as we would have to commence watches and start flashing-up 24 hrs before the shift.
When all was ready for the move, with John(?) Archer (pilot) on the bridge we would get "Stand-by", on the telegraph, the tugs (those two huge powerful tugs "Samson" and "Hercules") would drag us out of the way of the "Bluey" and we would then ponce around waiting for her to load about three teaspoons of tea and a pencil-erasers-worth of rubber taking, usually, three or four hours. They would then bugger-off and the ship would be dragged back into the berth and then, just before ringing "Finished with engines", we would get a "Dead Slow Ahead" followed instantly by "Stop". This sudden burst of "activity" was really just to justify the reason for raising main steam!!!!!
A couple of minutes later we'd get "Finished with Engines"!
All the engineers would then do a high-speed shut-down before "going on the lash" and cursing "Blue-flue" to Kingdom Come!!!!
Unfortunately we had all lost a weekend of going to Chinese restaurants and Mount Lavinia because of this "Main steam shift" obsession!!
Surprising what can still "rattle ones' cage" after all these years isn't it!? Tee Hee! Salaams Phil(Hippy)

pilot
15th November 2007, 10:05
When all was ready for the move, with John(?) Archer (pilot)

Or Tuby Cole Phil?

Roger Bentley
15th November 2007, 11:00
Was it Millers or was the name Cargills?
Salaams
Tony Greenwood

Tony, Well it clearly shows the name as Millers but there may well have been a Cargills! Salaams Roger

pilot
16th November 2007, 10:06
Was "Cargills" not around the corner from the GOH on the right hand side of the road heading away from the GOH?
Rgds.

gwzm
18th November 2007, 19:30
The store I'm thinking of as Cargills wasn't on the corner of a building. I seem to remember there were a few wide steps up into it from the street. It was just along the street from the barbers we used to use.
The barbers' shop had copies of the Daily Mirror, usually months old, with one weeks' worth stapled to gether and the capes had seelves so that you could have a read while you were getting your hair cut. They also specialised in giving you a scalp massge to finish off the haircut.
gwzm/John

pilot
20th November 2007, 14:55
An ex- Sri Lankan pilot today confirmed that the Chinese that did the famous take aways in the clocktower area was the Nanking.
He also tells me that Cargill's was up the street and around the corner from the G.O.H. Cargill's was a red brick building.
Rgds. Martin

Riptide
20th November 2007, 17:14
Hello Ken Carr.
Never liked crabs much,itched to much.
Ken.

Trevor
10th January 2008, 21:48
I remember that soup, we would fill the cabin thermos and bring it back to the ship. Did any of you sail on Brocks ships with Chinese fitters, fantastic tradesmen and great cooks; had some great meals with them.

Philthechill
13th January 2008, 16:38
I remember that soup, we would fill the cabin thermos and bring it back to the ship. Did any of you sail on Brocks ships with Chinese fitters, fantastic tradesmen and great cooks; had some great meals with them. Trev! I was on Makrana and Mangla with Chinese fitters and, as you say, not only were they good fitters they were brilliant cooks too. I was "chota teen sahib" on Mangla and, as this meant I was fridge man, I had access to the various fridge rooms. I was (for some reason which escapes me now) on 12-4 and every so often at around 03.30hrs. I would go into the veg. room, get a few bits and pieces of veg (carrots, cabbage etc.) give 'em to the Chinese fitter on watch with me who would then go up to his accommodation where he would prepare a meal for the two of us----------brilliant!!!! One trip on Makrana we were in Colombo for Chinese New Year and the Chinese fitters had been given the day off by the 2nd (can't remember his name now). They'd prepared this fabulous meal for all us Engineers and we all trooped down to their accommodation to partake. However the 2nd, who was their guest-of-honour, put quite a damper on proceedings when he announced, "I'm not going to eat THIS muck" and ordered something off the ship's menu. Needless to say after a few Tennents we forgot (even if we didn't forgive) his crass insensitivity and had a wonderful time. (The 2nd. had departed soon after he'd finished his meal so the atmosphere was most convivial!). It wasn't that he disliked only Chinese food, he would never eat curries either, sticking rigidly to the "English" side of the menu at meal-time! Most peculiar bloke!!!! I got a huge liking for the tinned abalone that was carried for the Chinese too! Dipped in soya sauce it was wonderful!!! Salaams Phil(Hippy)