New Holland pier, old ferry terminal.

dweeb
15th November 2007, 13:04
Ther pier was built to take rail passengers from the south to north banks of the Humber. The rails met the ferry at the end of the pier. I believe the ferry was once a paddle steamer, but I'm not sure. The pier was closed to trains when the Humber bridge was constructed, and has since been put to industrial use. We found a comedy access point, and made the journey out onto the Humber. The rails were still visable along the whole pier, with a new conveyer on top of them. At the end, both passenger shelters are still standing, with their original railway ironwork intact. Despite the new industrial buildings, the pier really has an old feel to it. All that can be said about the sunset that evening is WOW!
On our way out a car drove worryingly fast at us, and a well spoken gent informed us we had tripped the alarms and got him out of his house to find us! He was o.k really, and made us show him the access point we used, before letting us go with no fuss!

Historical view.
http://prismdata.hullcc.gov.uk/gallery2/d/96736-4/031+New+Holland+Ferry+and+Victoria+Pier.jpg

http://lightingthedarkness.co.uk/pictures/28%20days%202/Pier%20(11).JPG

http://lightingthedarkness.co.uk/pictures/28%20days%202/Pier%20(12).JPG

http://lightingthedarkness.co.uk/pictures/28%20days%202/Pier%20(15).JPG

dweeb
15th November 2007, 13:04
http://lightingthedarkness.co.uk/pictures/28%20days%202/Pier%20(17).JPG

This can be seen in the old photo above.
http://lightingthedarkness.co.uk/pictures/28%20days%202/Pier%20(18).JPG

http://lightingthedarkness.co.uk/pictures/28%20days%202/Pier%20(22).JPG

pete the pirate
19th November 2007, 20:02
If you want to see one of the paddle steamers, it is berthed in Grimsby old docks, last i heard as a restaurant / pub, "The Lincoln Castle", close to the fishing museum.
Pete

dweeb
19th November 2007, 21:03
Thanks for that I shall have a look next time I'm there...

Steve Farrow
19th November 2007, 23:02
If you want to see one of the paddle steamers, it is berthed in Grimsby old docks, last i heard as a restaurant / pub, "The Lincoln Castle", close to the fishing museum.
Pete
The Lincoln Castle was moved further up the quay near Corporation Bridge for repairs to her hull and has been closed to the public for a long time. She has had a full paint job and looks well, but I think there could be an issue between the council and her owners concerning a new mooring
Steve

trotterdotpom
19th November 2007, 23:50
Wingfield Castle is preserved at Hartlepool (where I believe she was built) and open to the public in the Maritime Museum.

Tattershall Castle is some sort of floating disco or something in London.

So all three of the Humber paddle wheelers have survived.

John T.

Steve Farrow
20th November 2007, 09:43
Wingfield Castle is preserved at Hartlepool (where I believe she was built) and open to the public in the Maritime Museum.

Tattershall Castle is some sort of floating disco or something in London.

So all three of the Humber paddle wheelers have survived.

John T.

John,
Here is the Tattershall Castle on the Thames. Sh's laid on the opposite bank to the London Eye. Life-boat drill would be interesting!
Steve

trotterdotpom
20th November 2007, 11:54
Thanks, Steve, I had a whirl on the London Eye-sore a couple of years ago but never noticed her - too busy with the binnoculars trained on the windows of a hospital on the south bank.

I always enjoyed the crossing - the beer was available even after the pubs had shut ashore. Am I kidding myself that I could get a British Rail pork pie on board too? They had about the same texture as a brick, definitely not Newboulds of Middlesbrough, but I still liked them. If you timed it right you could walk off the ferry and get a pint in the Minerva.

John T.

K urgess
20th November 2007, 12:56
That's a sad picture.
Reminds me of a mamma-san.
Past it's best and too heavily made up to disguise the rot.

TIM HUDSON
20th November 2007, 13:30
was supposed to join s.s.City of Carlisle at Ming ming in 1963 as engineer apprentice however after awful journey from Cheshire ship not there. Wilson Line office on quay instructed me to take evening train to New Holland, ferry to Hull and bus to King George dock....my only experience of New Holland. Happy days...joined ships in Far East quicker !

trotterdotpom
20th November 2007, 14:43
Just for interest, next to New Holland lies the village of Barrow-on-Humber, home of John Harrison the 18th century clockmaker who made the first chronometer.

John T.

Anchorman
20th November 2007, 15:09
Barrow Haven is still going strong as a small timber port John T. I have posted a photo in coasters that I took last year?
Neil

RayJordandpo
20th November 2007, 16:36
Thanks, Steve, I had a whirl on the London Eye-sore a couple of years ago but never noticed her - too busy with the binnoculars trained on the windows of a hospital on the south bank.

I always enjoyed the crossing - the beer was available even after the pubs had shut ashore. Am I kidding myself that I could get a British Rail pork pie on board too? They had about the same texture as a brick, definitely not Newboulds of Middlesbrough, but I still liked them. If you timed it right you could walk off the ferry and get a pint in the Minerva.

John T.

You could buy a ticket for the river crossing from the office next door to Minerva. In fact as the ferries where owned by British Rail you could obtain a rail ticket there for train journeys anywhere in the UK. Story has it that it was the only railway station in the country without any trains! but I don't know if this is true.
Ray Jordan

davetodd
20th November 2007, 17:53
If you caught the early afternoon ferry from Victoria Pier and the crossing was quick, then catch the Lincoln train at New Holland but get off at Habrough, you have just enough time to down a pint at the Station pub before the from New Holland train to Grimsby left Habrough.
Didn't work on the way back though!
Have posted some photo's of Barton upon Humber taken recently.

trotterdotpom
21st November 2007, 11:23
Thanks Neil and Ray. Dave, it sounds like we all did the crossing for beer purposes and not the view - surely not!

John T.

Orbitaman
21st November 2007, 12:06
Thanks, Steve, I had a whirl on the London Eye-sore a couple of years ago but never noticed her - too busy with the binnoculars trained on the windows of a hospital on the south bank.

I always enjoyed the crossing - the beer was available even after the pubs had shut ashore. Am I kidding myself that I could get a British Rail pork pie on board too? They had about the same texture as a brick, definitely not Newboulds of Middlesbrough, but I still liked them. If you timed it right you could walk off the ferry and get a pint in the Minerva.

John T.

Newboulds pork pies, still available at Newboulds outlets throughout Cleveland, but not including Hartlepool, which for some reason does not come under the umbrella of this company.

slick
21st November 2007, 14:51
Just for interest, next to New Holland lies the village of Barrow-on-Humber, home of John Harrison the 18th century clockmaker who made the first chronometer.

John T.
All,
I believe that J. Harrison built the Church clock at Barrow, can anyone confirm?
Yours aye,
Slick

davetodd
21st November 2007, 15:40
Hello John T
Like any commuter, if you see a window of oppotunity then it is taken.
Anyway, when the ferry ran aground at low tides, the bar would run out of beer.
Best beer on that run was at Daddy Christmas's pub. Officially known as the |Oberon. Near Victoria Pier.
Cheers
Dave

dweeb
21st November 2007, 17:56
It's been great reading all this, the pier seems to mean so much more now I can picture all this going on. I love how most of the stories envolve ways of getting one more pint in!!

davetodd
21st November 2007, 18:44
Hello Slick
In 1722 Harrison built the clock for the Tower above Sir Charles Pelham's new stable block in Brocklesby Park, not far from Barrow.
It is still working as far as I know.It was made using lignum vitae and brass and does not need lubrication. (Carbon footprint zero)
Cheers
Dave

slick
22nd November 2007, 08:23
Dave,
Thank you very much for the information,on a similar vein, where did all the Mechanical Chronometers go?, after all every ship had two.
Yours aye,
slick

Peter4447
22nd November 2007, 09:16
Story has it that it was the only railway station in the country without any trains! but I don't know if this is true.
Ray Jordan

Sorry Ray

Dartmouth down here in Glorious Devon had no trains as passengers arrived and left from Kingswear just across the River Dart. Oddly the Dartmouth Station Master was senior to the one at Kingswear!

Peter4447(Jester)

RayJordandpo
2nd December 2007, 10:16
Hello Peter
Well there you go, I stand corrected.
I was in your neck of the woods on holiday a couple of years ago and did the ferry crossing from Dartmouth to Kingswear, a truely lovely part of the country. I vaguely remember an incident concerning the Kingswear cable ferry. I belive it got caught in a gust of wind and drifted on to some private yachts or something like that. Maybe you can enlighten us.
Ray Jordan

Medic
9th September 2008, 09:55
I was taken as a boy on the Tattershall Castle to New Holland from Hull. I thought I was going abroad!!
One thing I remember about leaving Hull was that the vessel was in a very tight dock and I was fascinated by the fenders being used to maneouvre her round a 90 degree turn.

Plumber
9th September 2008, 11:28
No one mentioned how often you could be stuck on a sandbank

Medic
9th September 2008, 15:41
And here is another picture of Tattershall Castle in the Thames.