Brocklebank lads how old are you!

japottinger
18th November 2007, 19:31
As the clocks tick on it may be interesting to learn of the age of the Brocklebank contributers, that is they do not come all over coy!
Seeing all the wonderful posts of the old days in the Ma---'s it truly seems like a different world now.

Celebrated the big 72 on 9th November.
Apart from a few twinges here and there cannot complain too much. Must have been the good feeding and tender loving care from the bestest company!

gwzm
18th November 2007, 20:21
Hi Jim,

Not bothered to admit it - now in my 64th year and the Brocklebank experience seems like it was yesterday.

gwzm/John

skymaster
18th November 2007, 21:48
No Problem here!I am 69 on March 19th 2008 joined Brocks October 1955 .SS Mathura.I will never forget those great times!

skymaster

Philthechill
18th November 2007, 22:22
Ich bin ein und sebenzig jahre alt, achtzehn November, zwei tausand und seben! Or summat like that! Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

R798780
18th November 2007, 22:33
Looks like I'm the spring chicken here, a mere 60.

sparkie2182
18th November 2007, 22:46
nope, i am.......... 52

ken carr
18th November 2007, 23:47
As mentioned in Colombo Memories, I was 73 on Nov 7th and still as fit as a Malley Bull. Joined the Magdapur on the 20th October 1955 as a very raw young Electrician. I should claim the title of Senior Ancient Mariner of the Electrical Fraternity T & J Brocklebank,The Honourable Ken, do I have any competition ???
Yours on Bended Knee
Ken

Derek Roger
19th November 2007, 00:02
Just a lad me ( 62 ) . Retired and glad to be so ! Derek

Nick Jones
19th November 2007, 00:21
I'll be 64 next month and joined Brocklebanks SS Matra in November 1968 as Chief Electrician. It was another lifetime ago I feel.

Cheers,
Nick Jones.

mclean
19th November 2007, 01:20
Am 66 and enjoying every minute. Only did a couple of coastal trips as 3rd. Mate on Malakand and Magdapur in 1964 before shifting to Guinea Gulf Line managed by Brocks. Do recall the pride the Brocks personnel had for the company. Colin

Derek Roger
19th November 2007, 02:09
Colin did you sail with Allan Atack ; Engineer while you were with Guinea Gulf by any chance ?
. I know he did a few trips down there and bought a Parrot ( African Gray ) which he named Sapoli . Strange bird ! It could be handled by men but would attack and bite women !
Regards Derek

mclean
19th November 2007, 03:11
Sorry Derek, don,t recall the name Allan Atack. African Grays were a favourite purchase down the coast as they are renowned for their great ability to speak. Quite a few of the would be Empire Builders who we carried as passengers would purchase them prior to their return trip back to the UK. It was amazing the amount of foul language they picked up from the crew on a trip from Lagos to Liverpool.!!!!! Best Regards Colin

Bob_F
19th November 2007, 04:46
No problem will be 73 in May 2008. Thought when I retired it would be the easy life, busier(sp) now than when working. Keep trying to keep up with the kids and grandkids, I know it wont happen but keeps us both healthy trying.
Cheers.
Bob Frizzell.

pilot
19th November 2007, 07:47
60 years old. Joined my first Brock. Ship Maskeliya in 1963. Left Brocks 1971. Only remember the good times with Brocks.Remember quite a few 'iffy ones with Mobil in the following 30 years though.
Rgds. Martin

Tony Sprigings
19th November 2007, 09:44
I have just turned 79 and still going strong. Don't make them like that anymore!

Roger Bentley
19th November 2007, 12:02
Moving along - I was 74 last month. Beginning to think the decade 1950-59 saw the last hurrah of the British MN. Glad I was at sea throughout it. Bit of arthritis in the hands and have had to change my golf grip to something called the baseball grip - sometimes it works sometimes it don't! Otherwise I keep takingthe pills. Salaams

Tony Selman
19th November 2007, 13:02
I am 62 now so towards the lower end of the posters so far. I joined Matra in March 1964 just before my 19th birthday.

John Leary
19th November 2007, 14:20
Hi All
I guess I am in the middle group looking to become 67 next birthday. The strange thing is that although the face looking back at me in the mirror looks different to the picture in my discharge book, I still feel like the young twentysomething that sailed with Brocks in 1963. Inside though I could'nt run to save my life.

RCHARLTON
19th November 2007, 15:25
Looks like I am one of the youngsters at 58. Sailed on Markhor, Mahseer, and Mahsud from 1969 to 1971.

Regards,
Ray

Roger Bentley
19th November 2007, 17:37
I have just turned 79 and still going strong. Don't make them like that anymore!

Tony, It looks as they used to say in diplomatic circles that you are the Doyen and I may well be second at 74. Salaams, Roger (A)

tedc
19th November 2007, 20:13
I'm only 71 so I'm not quite as delapidated as some of the older Bracks men.

I still remember spark transmitters, ships taking off the tops of their funnels (Manchester Ship Canal) and lights on the front whilst going through Suez.

- and some of the good curry meals we had in those ships!

Harry Nicholson
20th November 2007, 00:22
Been 69 since June. I still dream of wireless rooms, a sort of snug paradise. Brass aerial switchgear, CR100, rotary transformers in the cupboard, A Siemen's SB186 transmitter in the bench. A large neon tube on the bulkhead flickering as I work the key. Having a beer on Sunday lunchtime in Birkenhead with off duty ladies of the night... Anton Justman's Shag, Fair Maid (only tobacco that is).
Everything was perfect except for the coffee the 'boy' brought mid morning. I used to say 'little sugar'... (Tora Chinee?) but it seemed to get sweeter, my gums used to retreat in fright. I'm still recovering so I have it black now with no sugar.
I've just remembered the cockroaches! And the Auto Alarm going off in the eye watering Red Sea static. And the sweat dripping off my forehead onto the Basildon Bond as I tried to write home.
But young ladies did not have studs like rivets all over their faces...
It was not quite paradise but I'd like it all again.

Derek Roger
20th November 2007, 01:02
I have just turned 79 and still going strong. Don't make them like that anymore!

Hi Tony ;
Visited Allan Atack this October He keeps well and told me you and he had had a chat . Planning to fish Loch Tay with him next April . He is 72 now but I must say he is fitter than most 50 year olds and has a mass of projects which seems to keep him young . Some of them are a bit Heath Robinson like his mouse trap which when triggered sucks the poor beasts down a pipe and they are quickly humanly electrocuted .

Kind Regards Derek

PS We usually catch more Salmon than the " Loch Tay Elite " and we seem to be the ones who close the Bar ! Youngsters today didnt have " apprenticeship we did I suppose "
Derek

Tony Sprigings
20th November 2007, 09:08
Roger,
Not a very comfortable position to hold because there is only one way to go from here! Thinking of those days of the Magdapur. Most of the 'crew' have gone aloft I fear apart from thee and me.
Salaams, Tony

Tony Sprigings
20th November 2007, 09:10
Derek,
Thanks for news of Alan and hope you have a good trip over here in April next. Cheers,
Tony

Tony Crompton
20th November 2007, 10:33
I am 67 & 10 monhs!!

Joined Malancha in 1956 at 16 & 6 months after 2 years & 6 months on H.M.S. Worcester. Wondered if this could really be what the Merchant Navy and Brocklebanks was like sailing with Capt. Nutall. Then Mahseer, Makrana (from new for 2 years,Apprentice & 4th Mate) and Manaar on the "Car Run".

Met my wife when up for 2nd Mates and the thought of 5 or 6 months away did just not bear thinking about. Joined McAndrews for 3 or 4 week trips to the Med with 2 weeks in UK at the end (all on full Fgn Going seatime as wewere on Running Agreements).

To this day I wonder what ship I would have been sent to as Third Mate had I returned.

Next contact with Brocklebanks was as a Tees Pilot where I was just senior enough to do large cargo ships before they finally stopped running. PilotedMahout, Markhor, and Maihar to & from Middlesbrough Dock.

Regards, Tony Crompton

DerekT
22nd November 2007, 10:49
Hi,
Haven't been on the site for awhile but I am 60, my first ship was Maskeliya, joined August 1964. my senior apprentice was Jack Dobson who I believe ended up piloting in Richards Bay (S. Africa). Old Man was Tony Sprigings.

DerekT

Tony Sprigings
22nd November 2007, 15:44
DerekT,
Good to hear from you again. Do you remember that the Mate was Dave Woolfenden. I still keep in touch with him. Lot of water has passed under the bridge since those days.

DerekT
22nd November 2007, 20:50
Tony,
Hi there, it's along time since the Maskeliya, one of my enduring memories was on my first morning I was on the 8-12 watch but was 5 minutes late because even though we were still in the lock (Liverpool, can't remember the dock) I was not feeling great the very beginning of sea sickness. Anyway after arriving on the Bridge feeling a bit sorry for myself, you asked me why I was late and then sent me down to get my waterproof, on my return I was sent out onto the bridge wing in the rain. This actually was the best thing as it drove all thoughts of being sick from my mind and I was never troubled by it again.
I have a christmas menu (1964) from Maskeliya, with, as you say Dave Woolfenden as mate, Dovell 2nd mate and wife, Talbot 3rd mate and Skillicorn was chief.
Well I enjoyed that trip and actually all my voyages with Brocks and I ended up 11/12 months on the Markhor, on charter to K line. After I took my ticket I went back to the Brocks office and asked if they intended to keep on chartering the Markhor and Mahout, unfortunately they said no, so I was left for Bibby Line, another good company.

DerekT

Stuart Smith
23rd November 2007, 11:59
I am 62 years and looking forward to retirement. Have been working in the automotive industry since leaving Brocklebank in 1966 and am now senior designer for vehicle suspensions at Delphi Automotive.
I have had three books published dealing with local history matters.
Sign into SN almost every day and love to read all the contributions, especially from old Brocks.
Stuart

Jim S
23rd November 2007, 21:53
I am 67. Joined Brocks after a year with Furness Withy in October 1962.
Two coastal trips on Mahanada and Malakand followed by two trips on Maidan, one on Mathura then four on Magdapur.
Due to family illness the company allowed me to stay on the coast until resolved - coasted on Mangla, Maskeliya, Mathura, Maturata, Magdapur, Maidan and Maipura. ( four and a half years after joining Maidan as 5/E I did coastal on Maidan as 2/E.
Feel somewhat guilty in repaying the kindness showed by the company in leaving for Elders & Fyffes in October 1967. ( beginning to sound like Phil with confessions)

Johnstokoe
24th November 2007, 18:17
Who's going to work out the average age - anyone got a calculator? I am 62 and recall 26th. September 1961 joining the Malancha in Liverpool. My first trip and Malancha's last before the breakers.
Cheers to all John

john g
24th November 2007, 19:55
Looks like I am one of the youngsters at 58. Sailed on Markhor, Mahseer, and Mahsud from 1969 to 1971.

Regards,
Ray

Ray I'm 59 so must have been prowling around the same time as you , are you ex app with Cunard did you go to B'head or Riversdale ?...john g

Semaj
24th November 2007, 22:49
Aged 62 joined the Maidan on the 29th Dec 1965 as Junior Engineer. Really looked forward to my first voyage from Liverpool to Manchester guess what I came off the night watch and woke up in Manchester. (egg)
Jim.

RCHARLTON
25th November 2007, 00:59
John,

I went to Birkenhead 1966 to 1968 and Riversdale 1969/1970. Started as a Cunard apprentice and ended up with Brocks after Riversdale.

Regards,
Ray

S Fraser
25th November 2007, 09:23
Who's going to work out the average age - anyone got a calculator? I am 62 and recall 26th. September 1961 joining the Malancha in Liverpool. My first trip and Malancha's last before the breakers.
Cheers to all John

Exactly the same deck intake as you John, sailing on my first trip on the Maskeliya out of Tilbury in Sept 1961. Then Mahanada (2 very long trips), Masirah, Mathura, Mangla (2 trips), plus a stint attached to the Liverpool HQ. I know our paths have crossed. Left Brocks in the late 60's, and am still gainfully employed with a large US corporation, and expect to be with them for another year, and then not sure what is next.
Regards to all. Stan

Supergoods
25th November 2007, 23:03
Been 69 since June. I still dream of wireless rooms, a sort of snug paradise. Brass aerial switchgear, CR100, rotary transformers in the cupboard, A Siemen's SB186 transmitter in the bench. A large neon tube on the bulkhead flickering as I work the key.

Harry,

I think we sailed together on the old 1917 Maihar about 1960.

If I remember correctly your wife came along for the ride.

I seem to remember the radar on the Maihar was a war surplus Admiralty unit which required you to get up to change the range.

Ian Roberts Brocklebank Apprentice & 4th Mate 1958 to 1962 which makes me 65 and still active, only surrendered my ticket last year due to medical reasons.

Harry Nicholson
26th November 2007, 00:19
Harry,

I think we sailed together on the old 1917 Maihar about 1960.
If I remember correctly your wife came along for the ride.
Ian Roberts Brocklebank Apprentice & 4th Mate 1958 to 1962

Hello Ian.
I did not sail on Maihar. Beryl was with me for one trip deep sea on the Marwarri in 1960 (we went to the States after India on that trip). The chippy was a large very memorable Dutchman called Gus. Captain Saxty in charge. On the way back from the States the beer ran out. Ring any bells? Beryl has some photos of the trip but I don't know if she has put names to the people. At the moment I can hardly remember my own name. Can't place you at this precise moment.

Supergoods
26th November 2007, 12:23
Harry,

You are correct, I thought it was the Marwarri at first and then seeing your posts on the Maihar, I thought maybe not and assummed age was taking its toll.

Later last night I saw your pic of the Marwarri in Malta which was taken on the same trip.

Do you remember buying all the cheap wine and then feeding it to the ships cat the next night.

My memories of that voyage were all good, I remember Gus well and his skill in building a cement box in Galveston after a tug put a hole in a weak spot in the hull.

Also the heavy weather on the trip back from New Orleans to Liverpool where I seem to remember she lived up to her rolling reputation by producing a couple of 40 degree rolls.

I have a colour picture of the Marwarri at Buj Buj in the Hoogly taken that trip which is attached.

Ian

S Fraser
26th November 2007, 14:47
Harry,

I think we sailed together on the old 1917 Maihar about 1960.

If I remember correctly your wife came along for the ride.

I seem to remember the radar on the Maihar was a war surplus Admiralty unit which required you to get up to change the range.

Ian Roberts Brocklebank Apprentice & 4th Mate 1958 to 1962 which makes me 65 and still active, only surrendered my ticket last year due to medical reasons.

Ian,
Did we sail together on the Maskeylia in 1961? I sailed with an apprentice that we called "Toastie". Was this you?
Stan

Supergoods
26th November 2007, 19:57
Ian,
Did we sail together on the Maskeylia in 1961? I sailed with an apprentice that we called "Toastie". Was this you?
Stan

Yes it is I.

Remember fixing the bell in the apprentices study so the night man could sleep in peace.

Attached are a couple of pictures from the voyage, one at Assab when we officially opened the port after taking an Ethiopian Prince in the passenger accomodation from Massawa and the other at Vizag from the hill by the entrance.

Remember hiking up to the Dolphin's Nose Lighthouse?

Ian

David Byrne
26th November 2007, 20:21
Oh all right then, seeing that John Stokoe, Ray Charlton and Derek Thomas have all come clean I will admit to being 60 and a bit - but when I grow up I still want to go to sea.

David Byrne

Harry Nicholson
27th November 2007, 00:25
Harry,
Later last night I saw your pic of the Marwarri in Malta which was taken on the same trip.
Do you remember buying all the cheap wine and then feeding it to the ships cat the next night.
My memories of that voyage were all good, I remember Gus well and his skill in building a cement box in Galveston after a tug put a hole in a weak spot in the hull.
Also the heavy weather on the trip back from New Orleans to Liverpool where I seem to remember she lived up to her rolling reputation by producing a couple of 40 degree rolls.
I have a colour picture of the Marwarri at Buj Buj in the Hoogly taken that trip which is attached.
Ian

Hello Ian.
Ah yes. Now you say you are Toastie I do remember you. I've just told Beryl that you've surfaced. She remembers you and said I had to remind you of the time she sewed up your trousers - the stitches had fallen out all up the side of the leg. I very dimly remember the cat and the wine. Was the cat Jool Wallah (sh1tty ar*e), the one with no tail a big Tom that Bill Milne the mate brought back inside his shirt from a New Zealand s.co. vessel she went drinking on in Kidderpore Dock? Or was it one of the two little cats that came aboard in Boulogne?
The trip From N.O. was fierce yes. Storms all the way, no sightings, 40 miles off course, steaming straight for Malin Head at one point. Bill Milne would'nt accept my DF bearings until he saw those cliffs straight in front. They came on the radar at about 30 miles but he still would not have it.
We went into Valetta because some shoreside wallah in the UK had left a sweeping brush leaning against an engine room fan, inside the casing, and eventually it jammed the fan.
Was it Galveston where the tug pushed a hole in the side? I thought it was Savannah? I seem to remember drydocking in Mobile but that might have been another time.
Did you do the next trip? The Marwarri was falling to bits and it all got a bit worrying.
Good to see you here Ian and great pictures thankyou.
regards
Harry
(ps Assab picture. Was that a new port? We went to Assab on the Marwarri trip (the varnish melted in the wireless room), it didn't look like that.

Supergoods
27th November 2007, 12:47
See notes in your text:


I've just told Beryl that you've surfaced. She remembers you and said I had to remind you of the time she sewed up your trousers - the stitches had fallen out all up the side of the leg.

Salaams to Beryl, I hope you are both enjoying a well earned retirement.

I very dimly remember the cat and the wine. Was the cat Jool Wallah (sh1tty ar*e), the one with no tail a big Tom that Bill Milne the mate brought back inside his shirt from a New Zealand s.co. vessel she went drinking on in Kidderpore Dock?

JW came from a Port Line vessel that was on charter to Brocks at the time, he refused to drink the wine, but enjoyed several saucers of Tennants on board, it was the little cats that were the wine drinkers.

The trip From N.O. was fierce yes. Storms all the way, no sightings, 40 miles off course, steaming straight for Malin Head at one point. Bill Milne would'nt accept my DF bearings until he saw those cliffs straight in front. They came on the radar at about 30 miles but he still would not have it.

Ah Yes the dreaded D/F, very good in skilled hands, but a nightmare in unskilled, many was the time coming across Biscay up to Ushant when we would have done better on Dead Reckoning, the young pups I work with have no concept on how we used to navigate

We went into Valetta because some shoreside wallah in the UK had left a sweeping brush leaning against an engine room fan, inside the casing, and eventually it jammed the fan.
Was it Galveston where the tug pushed a hole in the side? I thought it was Savannah? I seem to remember drydocking in Mobile but that might have been another time.

I think that must have been the next trip for the Mobile drydocking

Did you do the next trip? The Marwarri was falling to bits and it all got a bit worrying.

I only did the one trip, it seems that management liked to move the apprenti around a lot to give them more experience, The full list of my ships was Mahanada-Mahronda-Maidan-Makrana-Marwarri-Maihar-Maidan again-Maskeliya, Mahseer although I don't have a full record as we did not get discharge book entries, having sold our souls to the gods of Cunard Building. After 2nd Mates I went to NZS as the prospects in the Indian trade looked very poor

Good to see you here Ian and great pictures thankyou.
regards
Harry
(ps Assab picture. Was that a new port? We went to Assab on the Marwarri trip (the varnish melted in the wireless room), it didn't look like that.

Assab had been in existance for a few years, the occaision was the Official Opening with the Captain receiving some award from Haille Selassie for services as the temporary Royal Yacht.

Johnstokoe
27th November 2007, 18:26
David, Wasn't our trip together on the Mahout - the dates I have here are July 64 until January 65. It was time for change after that trip and particularly, if I remember correctly, the company deducted 5 from my pay for not completing the correspondence course. You are still a youngster - whereas I have been enjoying retirement for 10 years at the end of this year.
Best regards John

S Fraser
27th November 2007, 21:13
Yes it is I.

Remember fixing the bell in the apprentices study so the night man could sleep in peace.

Attached are a couple of pictures from the voyage, one at Assab when we officially opened the port after taking an Ethiopian Prince in the passenger accomodation from Massawa and the other at Vizag from the hill by the entrance.

Remember hiking up to the Dolphin's Nose Lighthouse?

Ian

Ian,
Good to hear from you again after 46 years!! I remember many things about my first trip, but particularly th Assab events, and great to see the Maskeliya dressed over-all. We carried Prince Alexander Desta, and you and I entertained I think the entire Ethiopian Navy midshipman force in our cabin (all 2 of them) They only had one small gun-boat. The "Old man" Tubby Evans received a medal from Hailie Selassie, with whom he seemed to have a great chemistry as they were both about 4' 10'' in their stocking feet.
Happy days!!
Stan

David Byrne
27th November 2007, 21:25
Hello John,

Yes we sailed together in 1964/5 on the Mahout. I do recall being as green as grass, as a matter of fact, but still, survived it and went on to continue being a little less green as time went by.

I remember, amongst others, Ali MacVean, who recently retired as MD, I think, of CMA/CMG; Hawkins RA, one of the engineer cadets from deepest Liverpool whose response to everything was 'RA...'; David Cosker (gentleman); Paddy Jackson was the Old Man, who seemed like an old sea dog to me; and you, of course!

I recall that on our way home across the Atlantic we hit some fairly fierce weather and because you and I had to take the liquid lard temperatures every two (or four?) hours we were often to be seen wave dodging up the foredeck. On one early morning the ship gave a mighty roll and the engine stopped, for a reasonably long, quiet moment. The story was that the lube oil suction in the sump was lost because of the roll angle and the engine cut-out. Recently, I have been having some discussions with a well-known shipbuilder who insists that it can't happen - is your memory the same as mine, that it did happen? Has anyone else got similar experience with motor ships?

Although I live and work in Newcastle I have been responsible for designing most of the floating bits in the Mersey in recent years - the Twelve Quays pontoon and bridge, Seacombe landing stage, the IOMSPC terminal and the new cruise facility (not the concrete pontoons!) - good to keep in contact with the old city.

I have seen some of the work you have done on historical research in Liverpool - great stuff!

David

Derek Roger
27th November 2007, 22:24
David ; I sailed on Mahout and Markhor and they certainly had low lub oil pressure alarms . I have a complete " Mahout " control diagram I produced as apprentice and will dig it out and retrace all the systems and see if there is a shut down as well . The Mahout system was a control that fully integrated all the Sulzer controls with the engine monitoring and bridge control systems .
There is a picture in my gallery of it but hardly legible for your purposes .
It is certainly normal today to have low lub oil pressure shut downs and I cant conceive why your shipbuilder friend thinks differently.
Normally the alarm is set just at the lower end of the operating range with the shut down a few pounds less .
Certainly if your main engine sump level was too low the pumps could be starved during heavy pitching and rolling .
I will check the system and get back to you .
Regards Derek

PS I sailed on her in 1966 as apprentice and then as acting 5th Eng on the coast ( My own watch at last !) Had to promote me as they couldnt get a qualifed 4th for the vessel .

Supergoods
27th November 2007, 22:38
Ian,
Good to hear from you again after 46 years!! I remember many things about my first trip, but particularly th Assab events, and great to see the Maskeliya dressed over-all. We carried Prince Alexander Desta, and you and I entertained I think the entire Ethiopian Navy midshipman force in our cabin (all 2 of them) They only had one small gun-boat. The "Old man" Tubby Evans received a medal from Hailie Selassie, with whom he seemed to have a great chemistry as they were both about 4' 10'' in their stocking feet.
Happy days!!
Stan

Stan,

were you on the bridge leaving Mukalla when Tubby Evans made a flying leap for the whistle pull to salute the local sheik and ended up breaking the line, falling to the deck and having the loose wire coil on top of him.

Sadly he didn't think it was funny, even if I couldn't conceal my mirth.

Were you on the trip to Kandy on the mission bus from Colombo, if so I have a slide of you drinking from a coconut along the road.

happy Days

Ian

S Fraser
28th November 2007, 17:54
Stan,

were you on the bridge leaving Mukalla when Tubby Evans made a flying leap for the whistle pull to salute the local sheik and ended up breaking the line, falling to the deck and having the loose wire coil on top of him.

Sadly he didn't think it was funny, even if I couldn't conceal my mirth.

Were you on the trip to Kandy on the mission bus from Colombo, if so I have a slide of you drinking from a coconut along the road.

happy Days

Ian

Ian,
I certainly did do the Kandy trip, and I can remember a fantastic day out that the officers paid for, so any photograhs of that would be of great interest. The great thing about this site is not only does it brings past shipmates together, but as with your questions it causes the "grey matter" to really work to remember events of the past. When I saw your mail I had this instant flash back to standing on the port wing and Tubby falling all over the deck. As I remenber it you fell about laughing and the more he got agitated the more you laughed. He then dismissed you from the bridge, but as you were half way down the brige ladder he went to the top of the ladder and called you back. You then had to turn around and lookup to him and you got a right royal "bollocking". This was "Tubby's" well practiced method of making sure no-one could look down on him as he exercised his authority, and it was a very effective method that I saw him use on a number of occasions.
On a seperate note did you and I also run into some real trouble in Port Sudan with an English pilot?
Thoughts on this are starting to stir!!
Regards,
Stan

Supergoods
29th November 2007, 03:43
Ian,

On a seperate note did you and I also run into some real trouble in Port Sudan with an English pilot?
Thoughts on this are starting to stir!!
Regards,
Stan

Stan,

We had accepted an invitation to go ashore with one of the expat pilots.

We had an excellent steak, provenance unknown, and a couple of beers and he proposed going on to meet some "ladies".

We, correctly as it turned out, since the local police raided the establishment while he was there, decided to return to the ship thanking him for the meal.

There was an inquisition the next morning, but we were able to satisfy the powers that be that we had not gone with him wherever he went after the meal.

It seems after all that I was sentanced to spend another trip as an apprentice under the tender loving care of Tony Briggs the C/O on the Maidan before getting the customary 4/O slot on the Mahseer.

Pictures are presently on slides and will have to wait until I replace my slide scanner which is not upgradable to Windows XP.

One of the projects for my upcoming retirement on April 4 next year.

We cannot be copmpelled to retire at 65 here and as the government doesn't want the potential liability, they are very happy for us to carry on.

The only problem is some of my work involves climbing into very confined spaces and the joints just don't bend as they used to.

Ian

Landlubber
29th November 2007, 09:20
It seems after all that I was sentanced to spend another trip as an apprentice under the tender loving care of Tony Briggs the C/O

You must have been very happy about that. I had the pleasure of making my first trip as C/O with the kindly Captain APB.
(Whaaa)

sparkie2182
29th November 2007, 21:25
i made my first trip as r/o with the aforementioned captain APB (cunard chieftain)

do you think we should start a thead on this gentleman? or a website?

Supergoods
30th November 2007, 05:03
You must have been very happy about that. I had the pleasure of making my first trip as C/O with the kindly Captain APB.
(Whaaa)

Absolutely extatic as it was my second trip with the gentleman, Maidan in 1959/60 and again in 1961/62.

After that when I finally got to the Mahseer as 4/O, there he was again on a coasting job.

I do remember his wife who was on the second Maidan trip always had kind words for the apprentices after particularly unpleasant sessions.

There are probably some legal reasons why it wouldn't be a good idea for an APB website

Ian

sparkie2182
30th November 2007, 20:56
hi supergoods...........

"particularly unpleasant sessions"........... there were no no other kind............ for anyone.

i have been probing the internet legality of admissions, and, not wishing to involve s.n. in such problems, have to agree with you.

one of the sad reflections of a site such as this, is how it is sometimes unlawfull to state the facts.

japottinger
3rd December 2007, 19:04
What have I started!

Sister Eleff
3rd December 2007, 20:39
What have I started!

You started a great thread japottinger (Applause) I have been following it with great interest even though I am not a Brocklebank lad (or lass for that matter). I have enjoyed watching old ship mates meet and share stories with all of us; referring to stories that can't be told, and don't really need to be as we get the idea!

Thank you

sparkie2182
4th December 2007, 01:41
landlubber and supergoods.............

i wonder if you remember his own interpretation of his initials...... A.P.B.?

Landlubber
4th December 2007, 09:10
Wasn't it something along the line of "A Pure Ba----d" ?

Stuart Smith
4th December 2007, 13:11
What a great thread this has turned out to be and I agree with Sister Eleff.
I find it fascinating that people I have never met and never heard were once very close to becoming friends and collegues. Reading these memories I realise that many of them occurred on the voyage before I joined the ship or the voyage after I left the ship. The only time I concur is with JimS when we were on Maidan together for the final 3 months of 1963.
I believe that a Brocklebank re-union would seriously be a great event as we all seem to re-act with each other so well. I also realise that it will not happen as the logistics, cost, time and effort needed is just too much for one person.
Oh to have been aware of the previous two get togethers some years ago. As a matter of interest, how were people contacted about the re-union back then?
Stuart

Tony Selman
4th December 2007, 13:55
Stuart, I started a thread quite some time ago about a potential reunion. It got a very good response at the time but I had to withdraw my direct participation due to business commitments. I asked at the time if anyone wanted to take on the responsibility of setting a reunion up but the response, not surprisingly, was a deafening silence.

As it happens I hope to be fully retired in the New Year, as opposed to my current semi-comatose state, and it is possible/probable I might re-visit the project. I have recently done a lot of research on the location of the next AGM for the Radio Officers' Association. This will take place in Manchester in May 2008 and I must say I have learnt a lot in the process and that could well come in useful as a starting point for a Brock's reunion.

I completely agree with your sentiments and I think a reunion would be great. The last two reunions were set up by mail from mailing lists held by former Brock's men. In the process of mailing invitations out several families were upset about being contacted as the relevant person had passed on. I do not think that would be a good method and the lists will be yet further out of date. I think the best method will be to use this site with plenty of notice and then word of mouth for non site users. I am sure we can rustle up a good gathering.

Salaams

Tony

sparkie2182
4th December 2007, 22:19
landlubber................

you are spot on..........A P ure Ba-----d .

this was his proudest and most often stated boast, and he certainly lived up to it in full measure.

his second most cherished claim to fame was that the company would not send deck apprentices to his ships, as too many had signed off his ship in the past, and left the sea altogether.

Derek Roger
5th December 2007, 00:50
landlubber................

you are spot on..........A P ure Ba-----d .

this was his proudest and most often stated boast, and he certainly lived up to it in full measure.

his second most cherished claim to fame was that the company would not send deck apprentices to his ships, as too many had signed off his ship in the past, and left the sea altogether.

I had the fortune / misfortune to be sent to Middlesboro along with 4 other engine room apprentices who I had been to Riversdale with and were all new 5th engineers . The company owned Smiths Dock and had an agreement that ships staff could do work during drydockings .
The Gentleman in question was the "Old Man " and took a particular dislike to us as we tended to go ashore a lot to the local working mens club and get into a bit of a mess .
Names were Dave Dowling ; Stan Robinson ; Terry Wynne and my pal from Hull who had the nickname "Pudd " ( cant for the life of me remember his real name ) and myself .

We ended up being summoned to his cabin for a formal dressing down ; we arrived still in our dirty boiler suits and were immediatley given a promise that if we didnt smarten up we would be fired ! ( Main issue was that we didnt shower and dress for lunch ; being involved with boiler cleaning ; little wonder! )

In the end nobody was fired and later when on leave I related the story to my father who got quite irrate as Briggs had been an deck apprentice with my dad on the old Makalla and was along with others a good friend . I got another dressing down from my father !

I changed my opinion of him after that but fortunatly our paths never crossed again .
Oh happy Days

sparkie2182
5th December 2007, 01:03
ever known a brock master who had an entire indian crew refuse to turn to.............

purely because of his attitude towards them?


you do now!

Derek Roger
5th December 2007, 01:32
Good Grief !
However having said that it was not uncommon in the 60s to have trouble with the Calcutta crews who were at that time dominated by a very active communist union .

With regards to the person to whom you refer ; he was not very popular with many but he did serve for over 40 years at sea including all of WW2 where he saw a lot of his mates lost ( Brocklebanks did loose a lot of ships and men during action )
He did not take kindly to people who " Bucked the system " ( Of which I was obviously one at the time I was under his command )

Some of the old hands who had seen the war did have some bitterness ; but in retrospect so probably would have we had we been there .

I would like to think that all of us ( although we may have had some bad experiences ) would try to find some good and perhaps learning from those events .
Kind Regards Derek

pilot
5th December 2007, 07:30
In my career at sea, and later as a Pilot I have known a fair percentages of PBs.

I would say in defence of the original APB that he was a fine seaman, who did not suffer fools gladly. Indeed when thinking back to PBs I have sailed with APB certainly does not spring readily to mind.

I remember a couple of "PBs" in Brocks. A C/O ( we know who this is Nick?) and a Cunard Master who I was unable to find any respect for whatsover.
They were PBs who were just a waste of space.

I could continue Character Assisinations to include Mobil and my local Port Authority. None would compare with the Cunard Master and Brock. C/O and APB would not warrant any mention amongst these gems.

I would very much echo Derek's comments concerning what these gentelmen had gone through for 6 years and my lasting memory of APB, who I sailed with as 3rd and 2nd Mate, was that he did not suffer fools gladly.

Rgds.

R798780
5th December 2007, 08:13
I only met Tony Briggs once, when Cunard-Brocks were sending people on an Omega Navigator course in Croydon in '76. Just an ordinary guy in civies. But I did hear stories. On a fruit boat in the Falklands he reputedly kept a tight fist on the entertainment budget. Something along the lines of "Buy it yourself or offer them tea".
If only the directors were as frugal.

Nick Jones
5th December 2007, 10:21
I must have been lucky during my time with Brocks, as the two skippers I sailed with, George Sinclair and Sam Baxter were gentlemen. As Pilot said we did have a, should we say strange C/O on the Matra and again on my last voyage who shall remain nameless. Captain Lucky on the Luminous was another story, especially if you beat him at Cribbage.

Cheers,
Nick Jones

Landlubber
5th December 2007, 10:53
I have to agree with Pilot. Briggsey (as he was also known) was by no means the worst old man I sailed with. He was difficult to get on with at times, but it was possible to reason with him. For instance, one day we were both on the bridge chatting when one of the Indian crew attempted to enter the wheelhouse. Unfortunately this man was attempting to open the windward wheelhouse door. He got it partially open when Briggsey slammed it shut on his fingers and held it closed, with the seaman screaming in agony.
I rushed across, gently brushing aside the Captain, released the man's hand and gesticulated to him to go around the back of the wheelhouse and enter via the lee door.
I told Briggsey that I was not very impressed by his actions. He remonstrated that the the man should not have tried to enter via the windward door, and should have known better. I concurred but told him that was no excuse to trap the man's hand in the door. He actually agreed with me and appologized (although not to the injured seaman).

I did get a very good report from APB. This must have impressed the personnel dept because next trip I got to sail with another master of similar reputation.

Derek Roger
5th December 2007, 15:46
I must have been lucky during my time with Brocks, as the two skippers I sailed with, George Sinclair and Sam Baxter were gentlemen. As Pilot said we did have a, should we say strange C/O on the Matra and again on my last voyage who shall remain nameless. Captain Lucky on the Luminous was another story, especially if you beat him at Cribbage.

Cheers,
Nick Jones

Sailed with " Sam San " Baxter as he was renamed when we were on the Mitsui charters . A true gentleman and a pleasure to sail with .
Also sailed with Lucky Bill including his last trip before retirement ; we gave him a fancy Meercham pipe and managed to get the merchant navy program to give a little history of his service at sea and they played " Bridge Over Troubled Waters " for him . Brought tears to his eyes . When he left the ship for the last time all the crew and officers lined the Quay and clapped as he left .
Bill had come up the hawse pipe and been in the water twice during the war . he did however as you said get quite upset if he lost at crib or table tennis both of which he was very good .
Cheers Derek

sparkie2182
5th December 2007, 17:58
hello everyone.........

the deliberate slamming of a wheelhouse door on the fingers of another tells
its own story.

i too had the honour to sail with masters who had served through 6 years of war, and found them to have been the finest of men.

maybe a few posts on some of these chaps may counterbalance the thread.


best regards to all.................

Tony Selman
5th December 2007, 18:55
I sailed with a couple of Masters who I would have preferred not to sail with again but I have no experience of APB. I did not sail with a "bad" Captain in Brock's but I did sail with very many "good" ones and I hope this goes some way to balance any negativity concerning APB. All the Masters I sailed with on the tankers were excellent men in different ways. Captains Luckey, Murray, Mason and Waters were all good men and it was a pleasure to sail with such professional seamen. Captain Waters did not have the best of reputations but he was a gentleman with me and he regularly came into the Radio Room for long chats. I think he more than any other Captain brought it home to me how lonely the Master of a ship could be, he certainly struck me that way.

I think I personally experienced pretty much the best and worst of it on two consecutive voyages on Alaunia on the Cunard North Atlantic run. The first trip was with a small Welsh Captain called Davies and he was hard work in the extreme but the following trip was with "Zulu" Thomson, who as you might imagine was South African, and was a very senior man on Queen Elizabeth (Staff Captain I think) relieving for one trip. He was quite outstanding and he was the same when I had a nightmare trip on Samaria 18 months later.

Off the top of my head the only Brocklebank Master I can recall sailing with who I am fairly certain was in command during the war was Captain Maclaren. He was a complete gentleman and an excellent person to sail with.

ken carr
6th December 2007, 00:40
Every Master I sailed whith in T&J was an absolute gentleman, never had any problems, each and every one had my complete respect. Now just to remind you guy's I am still only 73 how about that? however lets keep this thread going, it's a ripper
Yours On Bended Knee
Ken Carr

Supergoods
6th December 2007, 03:57
I almost feel sorry for raising the APB specter from the past, generally the Captains and Officers in Brocklebanks were excellent.

Certainly I didn't leave Brocks for reasons other than the reality of the Indian trade in the 1960's

Its human nature that the unpleasant trips stick in memory as do the very good ones, however the average trips which were the great majority seem to fade from memory.

Until recently I was able to list all my trips in order but somehow they are blending into one vey good experience.

ian

sparkie2182
6th December 2007, 21:51
i agree entirely supergoods..........

one ghost best forgotten................................

Supergoods
6th December 2007, 23:35
Talking of Ghosts,

Does anybody remember the Ghost (Presumably a corruption of Ghose) who ran our errands in Calcutta such as getting photos printed, etc.

Did he last until the end of the Brocks service?

Ian

Derek Roger
6th December 2007, 23:46
Yes indeed !
My last trip to Cal was on Markhor and I gave him some errands to run . He could buy things far cheaper than we could and still make a good profit , That would have been in 1969 . Dont know about after that .
I think he called himself Alistar Simms if my memory serves me well !
Last order I gave him was for a dozen Duck Eggs which he was able to find .

Regards Derek

Roger Bentley
7th December 2007, 19:34
I remember Druhba Paul a thin chap who used to come on board each day and take orders for stamps etc. A chief R/O I sailed with had found out quite a lot about him. He had been stabbed during the 1947 riots when India and Pakistan became separate nations. Each day he came over Howrah bridge to the docks. He was completely honest and I thank God that I didn't have to live the life he did. On the slender commisions we gave him he had to pay bribes and try and make up the dowrys for his daughters. He was still going strong in 1961 when I left Brocklebanks and presumably he carried on. His waistcoat under his lungyi seemed to have the most capacious pockets for all his bits and pieces. He was a real character.

Tony Crompton
7th December 2007, 20:10
I still have one of Pauls Xmas Cards from Makrana,probably 1958.

Tony

Derek Roger
7th December 2007, 23:54
a nice piece of Nostalgia . Thanks Tony Derek

Roger Bentley
8th December 2007, 17:38
Thanks Tony for the reminder of his work. He used to make picture frames of industrial strength and always on the back put his label. The wording of which was - Druhba Paul - Book Binder, Picture Framer, Watch Clock Typewriter Fopuntain Pen Repairer and all sorts of Electro Plater - I always remember the plating was rather thin and soon wore off. There was another chap who specialised in dry cleaning and his card always had the wording - all kinds of invasable (sic) mending. Then there was the tailors and the shoemaker. All part of the rich pageant of arrival in Kidderpore! Salaams, Roger

Derek Roger
8th December 2007, 18:23
The shoemakers were great . I had a pair of engine rooms shoes which lasted for years ! Three sets of new soles and 2 sets of new uppers and they were still the same shoes .
Derek

David Byrne
8th December 2007, 19:22
On the subject of PBs, I recall joining the Mawana in Rotterdam in July 1965, as Apprentice.

In my mind at the time it was something of an adventure to get over there on the train and ferry. I was informed by Head Office that I should travel in uniform because I was to be met at Rotterdam Central by the agent, taken to sign on at the High Commission, or some similar office, and then join the ship. The only slight fly in the ointment was that the Old Man was the notorious 'Ginger' Jackson and I had heard that he ate Apprentices for breakfast and was, to put it kindly, not user friendly.

When I arrived at Rotterdam I made immediate contact with the agent who had a car handy and we set off. By way of small talk I mentioned that I had heard that Ginger Jackson was a right bastard - the agent appeared to concur, with a small inclination of his head and a weak smile, as I conveniently recall.

When we arrived at the High Commission the official there asked me to sign on the dotted line and also invited the agent, who you can by now guess was otherwise known as Ginger Jackson, to also sign..... aaaarrrrgghhh!

Although he lived up to his reputation during the trip in his dealings with virtually everybody else onboard, he persisted in being incredibly good natured to me throughout!

I sailed twice with APB: once during the first few days of my first trip when he was Mate of the Elizabeth Holt (Guinea Gulf Line) and secondly he was Master on my first trip as Acting Third Mate - on both occasions I was new, nervy and learning fast, but not fast enough. APB was not a sweetheart but it was always very clear that he was a professional and he was someone I would still want on my side if the going got rough.

David Byrne

Tony Crompton
8th December 2007, 19:31
The inside of Pauls card.

Philthechill
9th December 2007, 08:57
Does anyone recall the Sikh book-wallah with the split thumb? He had a deformed thumb which looked like two mini-thumbs. I can't remember which hand it was on. It was incredible the huge pile of paperback books he could carry on his shoulder and, of course, like everyone who came aboard trading their various wares and services he was thin as a lath and I often wondered where they got the strength from to carry the incredible loads they actually did, either on their heads or their shoulders. Empty Tennents cans were a highly prized commodity too, weren't they? Huge "cartwheels" of cans tied-round with a manky old bit of string vanishing down the gangway with a pair of spindly brown legs poking-out from beneath them!!! A-h-h-h-h-h-h memories, memories!!! Surprising what stirs in the old grey matter when somebody is mentioned, from those far-off days, such as "The Ghost" or Druhba Paul. Surprisingly enough I can "see" Druhba Paul now with his very earnest thin face and his black hair plastered down on his head as he touted for your business. He was always, but always, clad in a clean white dhoti and highly-polished black shoes! Invariably polite he was a real pleasure to deal with.
They, "The Ghost", Druhba Paul, the split-thumbed Sikh book-wallah, the Chinese shoe-maker, the tailors and all the others who used to come aboard in Cal will always be remembered with great affection as they formed such an integral part of "The Brocklebank Experience". Burra salaams, Phil(Hippy)

pilot
9th December 2007, 13:41
Phil, many thanks for the memories. Must be something in the water in York that prompts these flash backs. I remembered Druhba Paul and the Ghost and now can also remember the book-wallah. Shore riggers and Gurkha watchmen. Brgds.

Tony Crompton
9th December 2007, 14:27
I remembered Druhba Paul and the Ghost and now can also remember the book-wallah. Shore riggers and Gurkha watchmen. Brgds.

and the Night Boy in Calcutta who would cook an enormous full cholestrol breakfast at 1 or 2 in the morning for the duty mate and apprentice when working cargo overnight.

Philthechill
9th December 2007, 14:27
Phil, many thanks for the memories. Must be something in the water in York that prompts these flash backs. I remembered Druhba Paul and the Ghost and now can also remember the book-wallah. Shore riggers and Gurkha watchmen. Brgds. Dunno about the water in York being an aide memoir it's probably the 40% strength Greenalls gin (12.49 per litre at Morrissons!!!!!) kept in the freezer at -20C, rakes of burruf, a splash of Angostura and topped-up with Schweppes tonic has more to do with it!!! Chin-chin!!! Phil(Hippy)

SCOTHEDE
9th December 2007, 14:58
I am now 58, joined Brocks in 1969. First trip was coasting on the Manaar.

Derek Scothern

skymaster
9th December 2007, 16:11
and the Night Boy in Calcutta who would cook an enormous full cholestrol breakfast at 1 or 2 in the morning for the duty mate and apprentice when working cargo overnight.

Tony,remember them well,do I remember that the eggs where very small.Really enjoyed those times.

Roger Bentley
9th December 2007, 19:45
I have found the two programmes and lists of attendees at the two reunions. For 1989 there were five full pages of names, and for 1989 they fitted on to two pages. Looking at the names I can see that many are no longer with us. Anno Domini is a harsh master! They may bring back some memories anyway. Regards, Roger

japottinger
9th December 2007, 20:23
I have found the two programmes and lists of attendees at the two reunions. For 1989 there were five full pages of names, and for 1989 they fitted on to two pages. Looking at the names I can see that many are no longer with us. Anno Domini is a harsh master! They may bring back some memories anyway. Regards, Roger

At risk of some blasphemy and brickbats can anyone tell me why someone still signs in as Captain So and So long after they have swallowed the anchor! We never see Chief Engineer Joe Blogs etc. I know some ex-service personnel do so also, but would assume to be correct any rank only applies when you are actually in service.

K urgess
9th December 2007, 20:28
Only know the RAF one where anyone Squadron Leader and above can use their title in civilian life. I assume the same applies to Army and RN ranks.
I think it's just tradition that any MN Master is addressed as Captain from simple politeness.
BTW the captain of an RAF aircraft was always the pilot irrespective of the ranks of the rest of the crew.

sparkie2182
9th December 2007, 21:10
always a good one on which to follow up, japottinger..........

i always remember a retired army officer telling me of the "pukka form" ......

any army officer below and including the rank of captain who "carries it into civvy life, is considered a "bounder".

i remember it well, as he was referring to the husband of the queens daughter
at the time.

Sister Eleff
9th December 2007, 21:11
I have known retired RN, Army & RAF Officers use their ranks as a form of address and don't mind it, however I don't think I would like to be addressed as 'Matron' (or whatever the current position is nowadays) for the rest of my time (==D)

sparkie2182
9th December 2007, 21:35
i much prefer it when it works in reverse..........

we had a passenger on one cruise who was known by all , passengers and crew alike as "jack".

he said to me one day........

"i joined the royal navy in the 1930s as an E.R.A.......and left 35 years later as an E.R.A."

naturally i needed clarification...........

" i joined as an Engine Room Apprentice and left as Engineering Rear Admiral"

as i say,much nicer when the rank "thing" works in reverse.

Roger Bentley
10th December 2007, 11:07
At risk of some blasphemy and brickbats can anyone tell me why someone still signs in as Captain So and So long after they have swallowed the anchor! We never see Chief Engineer Joe Blogs etc. I know some ex-service personnel do so also, but would assume to be correct any rank only applies when you are actually in service.

Jim, You hit on something that was commented on a lot at the 1993 reunion and that was the titles being used when they had not been used at the 1989 reunion. I did have a look in a book on etiquette in the local reference library and it does seem to be accepted that anyone who was in command in the MN is entitled to use the word Captain as a courtesy title. Personally I have no objection if someone wishes to use this, but it does jar with some people. At my last posting we were very friendly with one of the attaches a Wing Commander RAF who told me that use of ranks after retirement is gradually diminishing, and I see that he no longer uses his rank in correspondence following retirement. Salaams, Roger

pilot
10th December 2007, 13:10
anyone who was in command in the MN is entitled to use the word Captain as a courtesy title. Personally I have no objection if someone wishes to use this

That's a relief then. Rgds. Captain M. Cadman ;-)

Roger Bentley
11th December 2007, 11:41
That's a relief then. Rgds. Captain M. Cadman ;-)
Aye Aye Sir, handsomely done! Regards, RB(Thumb)

CRoger
11th December 2007, 19:58
HI there
I suppose I appear to be the youngster in the team only 58 or there abouts.
Much younger than my bruv Derek.
The worrying thing is that all of you silver haired sailors seem to have a much better memory than me.
I put it down to the fact that I am still working and only quaffing one bottle of gin a day.
I still remember all of the Brocklebank ships that I sailed but not all of the crew, sad aint it.
That pic of the Brockler recently posted was definitey in the Hoogly, look at the mud in the river.
To all that I sailed with on Makrana, Markhor, Maihar and Luxor Hi there and have a Happy Christmas.
Cheers for now from Inverness.

Derek Roger
12th December 2007, 00:05
I see my brother finally woke up !

He was at one of the reunions in Bootle .
I unfortunately couldnt make it at the time as I was working .

To all ex Brocks I echo Cammys early wishes for a Happy Christmas and Peacefull New Year .

Now that he is awake perhaps he will dig out some photographs and make a post or two in the Gallery !.

Cheers Derek

sparkie2182
12th December 2007, 00:08
happy xmas...... good new year derek

Supergoods
14th December 2007, 03:56
Stan,
Were you on the trip to Kandy on the mission bus from Colombo, if so I have a slide of you drinking from a coconut along the road.

happy Days

Ian

Stan, I think this photo is you on the Kandy Road

Philthechill
14th December 2007, 06:26
Stan, I think this photo is you on the Kandy RoadYes but who are the two blokes with "Stan"? Hee! Hee!(Hippy)

oglebilluk
14th December 2007, 11:40
Haven't been on the site recently, but feel I must confess to being a youthful (??) 68. It doesn't seem like that and joining the Matra at Birkenhead for my fist trip in September 1957 must be wrong, but isn't.

Have noticed a reference to Dhruba Paul and since I still have one of his framed photos with most of the label visible, have copied and hopefully attached it. The picture itself, of Malancha at Port Said, I've posted to the gallary

Regards

Bill

S Fraser
14th December 2007, 12:09
Stan, I think this photo is you on the Kandy Road

Ian,
Yes that is me, age 16, and I haven't changed!!!
Thanks for posting.
Stan

Supergoods
14th December 2007, 15:08
Yes but who are the two blokes with "Stan"? Hee! Hee!(Hippy)

The one on the left is the bus driver, the other is, I think, the 2/E Jake Donnely who was indentified on a Maskeliya group photo earlier today

Ian

Supergoods
1st January 2008, 21:35
A black labrador shipped as cargo on the Makrana from London to, I think, Colombo in late 1959 or early 1960.

Looks like some passengers in the photo, by the dress probably taken not long after leaving London.

Ian

mcook
22nd February 2008, 14:15
Hello all.

I have been away fom the site for a while so I am catching up.

57 and still at sea, although working on a DP dive support boat
in the Mexican oilfields is a world of difference from sailing across
the Indian Ocean on the M.........

I joined my first ship, the Mangla, in Las Palmas in June, 1968 as junior R/O with a senior R/O named Terry Maddrel who got fired at the end of that trip.

Cheers,

Malcolm

Peter Boggon
25th March 2008, 16:51
Have not been to the site for many moons. Great to see that there are so many ex Brock's people keeping in touch.

I joined 'Mahanada' as 2nd.steward in 1955 and swallowed the anchor from 'Malakand" in 1965 as P/CS.

For the age stakes I am 75 living in Australia and still fit and frisky (well perhaps not so frisky)

Regards to all of you who I have sailed with.

Peter

Roland Fox
29th April 2008, 11:39
I only did the one trip with Brocks, signed on the SS Marwarri the 11th Nov 57 and signed off on the 12th of June 58, I was a Harrison man who wanted a change. The trip was to Calcutta with all the stops possible, a rough passage thro the bay, and believe me the Marwarri rolled worse than any vessel I ever sailed on. A strike in Colombo that lasted three weeks, Boars on the Hoogly and warped the HP turbine, then the long haul home with a four day lay up in Algiers, the compound gen set blew up. Anyway Brocks were a good company to sail with, it was simple, the Marwarri was at retirement age, she was built in the late twenties.

Roland fox

Roland Fox
29th April 2008, 11:40
Bugger I forgot to tell you all I am 74

Roland Fox

gbcolbri
20th May 2008, 18:17
I am only a baby of 54, and you purists may say technically not a Brocklebank boy. However by the time I got there Moss Tankers Luminous, Lumen, Luxor, Lucigen, etc were all classed as Brocklebank vessels.

charles henry
20th May 2008, 19:25
Re worse ships/brocklebank
My last trip at sea was in 1954 and I never sailed on a Brocklebank owned ship.
However, having said that I have a warm memory of that particular company.
In 1942 I was on a Danish ship being managed by Brocklebank, a few months
after we were torpedoed and sunk I received an extremely pretty silver medalion from Brocklebank with their flag in ceramic on one side and on the other the inscription "mv Tasmania sunk by enemy action 10 Oct. 1942". To this day I feet that the company had some compassion for those that manned their ships.