Passat

Jan Hendrik
20th April 2005, 05:24
Sistership to the Pamir.
Built 1911 at Blohm und Voss, Hamburg
GRT 3181, length 115 metres, beam 14 metres, draft 7 metres

Now Museum ship in Travemuende, Germany.

Photos taken in 1969

Trade Wind
28th March 2006, 13:47
Passat and Pamir were "near sisters". Passat and Peking were built by Blohm & Voss in Hamburg side by side on adjacent slipways: rather closer to being real sisters.

Santos
28th March 2006, 19:14
Krusenstern Ex Padua

A four-masted steel barque built in 1926 by Joh. C. Tecklenborg, Wesermünde.Dimensions: 97,65×14,04×7,72 meters [320'5"×46'1"×25'4"] and tonnage: 3064 GRT and 2678 NRT.

Rigged with royal sails over double top and topgallant sails.

I am very fortunate to have been on her and seen over her, a wonderful ship.

To have seen her, Pamir and Passat and also Pommern together would have made my day.

Chris

mflapan
11th August 2008, 00:45
Dear all, for anyone in Sydney next week.

A presentation by Dr. Alston Kennerley on the Passat

Tuesday 19 August 2008, 6.00pm for 6.30pm
4th Floor, NSW Sports Club, 10–12 Hunter Street, Sydney.

Dr. Alston Kennerley, Master Mariner, BA, Dip Ed, MA, PhD, FNI will make a presentation to the Sydney Branch of the Company of Master Mariners of Australia, the Nautical Institute (South East Australia Branch), Royal Institute of Naval Architects (NSW Section) and Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (Sydney Branch).
There will be a nominal charge of $6.00 per person (payable at the door upstairs) to cover venue hire and light refreshments. All guests will be asked to sign the Club's visitor book downstairs.
Please advise your attendance to Capt Hubert Lersch on (02) 4328 1787 before noon on Friday 15 August 2008 (so that catering numbers can be finalised).

Alston Kennerley was born in 1935 in Liverpool. He came from a seafaring family (mother a clerk with Blue Funnel; father a radio officer with Holts, including 4 years in Charon in WWII; grandfather and great grandfather were ship's masters). After a primary education in Australia (Richmond School in East Fremantle) and a secondary education in England, he entered the service of the Liverpool shipowners, Alfred Holt & Co. (the Blue Funnel Line) in 1951 as midshipman (deck apprentice), subsequently serving the same company as deck officer. His apprenticeship had started with ten months' service as a cadet aboard the German four-masted barque Passat. In 1961, he obtained his master's certificate, having studied in Liverpool.
After reading history at the University of Wales, and a course in education, he became a lecturer in Plymouth, teaching navigation, education, maritime information and maritime history, and developing his research interests in maritime educational and social history. In the 1970s he became involved in the early development of maritime English courses for English-language teachers. He retired from his position as Principal Lecturer in the Institute of Marine Studies at the University of Plymouth in August 2000, having for many years been in charge of maritime undergraduate courses and subject leader for Maritime History.
In 1977 he was elected a Fellow of the Nautical Institute for services in the field of maritime information. In 1991 he was awarded a Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship, and since 1991 he has been an Honorary Fellow of the Centre for Maritime Historical Studies at the University of Exeter.

Arthur Jenner
9th January 2009, 08:57
The Pamir and the Passat were two of the great German P class. I understand that after WW2 the Pamir was owned by the NZ governemnt and the Passat was owned by Finland.
In 1947 I in was in Bunbury, West Australia on a ship MV Reaveley loading wheat for Karachi. The Passat was lying on the other side of our wharf. I was told that the Pamir had been modernised with power winches etc, while the Passat was still all manual. I had joined my ship in Adelaide not much earlier, but was very tempted to jump ship and join the Passat which was looking for crew members. Gazing up at those high masts though I realised that perhaps I was not cut out for tall ships.

A.J.McMahon
20th February 2009, 15:28
I recall going aboard the Passat at Avonmouth Docks. I cannot remember if it was an open day or if a relative of mine invited me. I was impressed by the ship. The year would be somewhere between 1946-50. On the same day I was allowed to drive on the footplate of a 0-6-0 saddle tank loco,pulling a load of wagons,owned by the P.B.A.--this was the real treat of the day for me. I remember the Passat and the Pamir being layed up in Penarth docks (Bristol Channel). Does anyone out there know the year they were at Penarth, prior to being sold on

tsell
2nd March 2009, 04:11
I recall going aboard the Passat at Avonmouth Docks. I cannot remember if it was an open day or if a relative of mine invited me. I was impressed by the ship. The year would be somewhere between 1946-50. On the same day I was allowed to drive on the footplate of a 0-6-0 saddle tank loco,pulling a load of wagons,owned by the P.B.A.--this was the real treat of the day for me. I remember the Passat and the Pamir being layed up in Penarth docks (Bristol Channel). Does anyone out there know the year they were at Penarth, prior to being sold on


Yes A.J. I remember them well. It was late 1949 at Penarth. Not sure if they were laid up though, although thinking back they probably were.
As 15 year olds my mate Phillip and I dodged the watchman and climbed aboard the Pamir ( or was it Passat ).
Anyway after a good look around we headed for the rigging and got a fair way up before we were spotted!
After a bit of a belting we made a pact that we were going to sea as soon as we left school, which wasn't long.
So we ended up at Cardiff Sea School at Roath Dock and joined our first ship together.
I had been fascinated by stories of these ships by an old Norwegian windjammer sailor, Silvert Dahl, who worked for my dad. He told me many stories of his life aboard these and other ships and thus put paid to any career my dad had mapped out for me as there was no stopping me from a life on the ocean wave.
Best thing I ever did and now pushing 75 I would do it all again if I could find that elusive elixir!!

Taffy R556959

Historicus
14th April 2009, 17:41
Hello friend McMahon,
The PASSAT arrived at Penarth 3 October 1949.
She left Penarth in tow for Antwerp 5 March 1951
The PAMIR arrived at Penarth 6 October 1949.
She left Penarth in tow for Antwerp 13 March 1951.
Best regards,
Luc, Antwerp