Joule (II)

vasco
28th December 2007, 17:31
Who remembers the Joule on the Ardjuna-Kaoshiung run in 77. We used to flog liquid refreshment to the guys on the gas barge 'Sakti' or Sanki. This was going to be used to improve the Bar. However due to in house wrangling nothing ever came of that, despite the best efforts of a certain Cat Off & 3/E.
If I remember right Harry Donker came on board and told the Engineers to scrap the inert gas genny as it was impossible to get working. He sat at the bar wondering where his missing telescopics were. Good job he didn't look to closely at the foot rail. He left and a few days later a telegraam arrived telling the ship to get the iG generator working.

We were being a little to social with the barge workers and the bargenaster, Virgil, warned his lads of visiting. That was until he was invited for dinner and they had to pour him in the net to get him off.

Kaoshiung, always a good stay as they used to ask for full speed, then they would over prssurise and we would stop for 12 hrs. Wonderful guys on board which made sailing on what I consider the worst ship i served on in Houlders bearable. Why worse? Read some of the posts here. She should have her own section!

Regards

Taffy

non descript
28th December 2007, 17:44
Who remembers the Joule ... She should have her own section!

Regards

Taffy

Taffy,
Your word is my command.
(Thumb)

non descript
28th December 2007, 17:48
I have given the thread a title that keeps the ship unique, as there were over the years, three Joules in the Houlders fleet, and this one was definitely unique. (Jester)

vasco
28th December 2007, 18:17
Thank you, only been a member for a few days but the memories are flooding back. Can't stay away from this great site.

saltyswamp
3rd January 2008, 20:41
Taffy,
Your word is my command.
(Thumb)

about time to(Pint)

non descript
3rd January 2008, 21:17
about time to(Pint)

I am hugely impressed with that photograph of you - I know the chair is yours, but did you borrow the cap? (Jester)

ps. Well done, it is a great reminder of years gone by, when it was all properly done. (Thumb)

saltyswamp
5th January 2008, 19:51
The chairs not mine mummy wanted a nice piccy of her little boy taken August71 down hill ever since
stuart

non descript
5th January 2008, 21:40
The chairs not mine mummy wanted a nice piccy of her little boy taken August 71 down hill ever since
stuart


Your Mum should be congratulated on her wise decision and I very much doubt your last part. (Thumb)

saltyswamp
5th January 2008, 22:34
We had to wear full uniform at plymouth for 2 years There was only two of us from Houlders mostly they were shell
stuart

MARINEJOCKY
13th January 2008, 23:25
I joined the Joule in Dubai on march, 20, 1977 and left in Singapore on september 14th 1977 and Vasco must have been on board with me and on the Cumbria back in 1973.

I sailed on numerous ships that Harry Donker looked after and we made tee shirts up with slogans like "Harry's Guys", "I survived the Black Max", "Joule??"

Seven cylinder KZ MAN on the Joule had so many fires that we would be down to four cylinders one time with the report that an underwater earth quake had sent a 100 foot wave heading our way. Thankfully nothing came of that.

I joined as a 5th engineer and was promoted to 4th and collapsed on a 12 to 4 watch one morning and thought I had a heart attack only top discover after a test in the clinic in Taiwan that I had eaten my pre watch sandwich & beer to quick and it was indegestion.

Many, Many memories of this ship, Dog'sy Dyson was captain, Tom Brown from Ulster was a 4th and the second was also from there.

Big storm one night had the spare piston rolling around on the top plates and nearly ended up with it on the open control platfrom.

Vasco, you must have joined the Cumbria with me in Skaramanga, I was a first tripper and in the next dry dock was a BP tanker that had a copy of the FA cup final. We all went over there but I was told that when visiting another ship I had to be in full uniform. so I went to that ship with full white uniform on including white shoes and a hat, long socks and brand new shorts and shirts along with my brand new "wings".

I was sure the cat whistles where for some other person as I climbed the BP gang way but then realised my "ship mates" were having a good one over the 1st tripper.

Many many more stories

vasco
9th March 2008, 16:37
'Vasco, you must have joined the Cumbria with me in Skaramanga'

Off course I did Malcolm. I was 3/0 on the Cumbria, joined in Skaramanga. The uniform bit I don't remember, maybe somebody was winding you up because of your Uncle (wasn't he a Super for HSC, the nice one).

On the Joule I was 2/O, with the Merry Magpie (Mike) as 3/O. I don't remember the engineering stories, but as I have said elsewhere, it was one of the worse ships I have been on but good fun.

Fond memories of Multi-coloured bridge wings (every Spanish AB managed to refill from a different shade of Eau-de-nile), Bosuns with bicycles and Ducks, and, best of all, tapping Dogsy on the Shoulder when the head came out of the Boat in Jaws. Did he jump!

Last I heard of Dogsy he was on the Cavendish in S America, married to a local lass. He was fun, never a dull moment. Search for Merry Magpies thread about his nickname. Mikes true version actually agrees with all the rumours I heard about his nickname.

John

Grymauch
20th October 2008, 17:30
A belated post to this thread having just joined this forum.

I joined the Joule in Cartegena in Spain around end Feb/early March 1977 as a deck cadet. I shared the owner's cabin with another cadet but Capt believed it was wrong to double up. As I was the senior cadet (phase 2) my opposite number drew the short straw and was given the sick bay. I could not believe my luck having a seperate bedroom, lounge and en-suite shower all to myself!

Sailed with her through the Suez, several trips between Kuwait and Bombay before heading for the far east. Like you Marinejocky I also paid off in Singapore.

My abiding memory of the Joule was bloody hard work but equally hard play. A great crew made up for being gassed on a regular basis. Alas this was my last ship before leaving the MN but with many happy memories.

non descript
20th October 2008, 17:36
Grymauch, a warm welcome to you on the occasion of your first posting - your comment "My abiding memory of the Joule was bloody hard work but equally hard play" strikes a chord (Jester) . You will find no shortage of Firey-Kippers on here; enjoy the site and all it has to offer. (Thumb)

saltyswamp
22nd October 2008, 22:19
A belated post to this thread having just joined this forum.

I joined the Joule in Cartegena in Spain around end Feb/early March 1977 as a deck cadet. I shared the owner's cabin with another cadet but Capt believed it was wrong to double up. As I was the senior cadet (phase 2) my opposite number drew the short straw and was given the sick bay. I could not believe my luck having a seperate bedroom, lounge and en-suite shower all to myself!

Sailed with her through the Suez, several trips between Kuwait and Bombay before heading for the far east. Like you Marinejocky I also paid off in Singapore.

My abiding memory of the Joule was bloody hard work but equally hard play. A great crew made up for being gassed on a regular basis. Alas this was my last ship before leaving the MN but with many happy memories.

Hi Grymauch
welcome from suffolk
You must have joined the Joule when Steve, Scouse & I left after doing drydock in Genoa and we sailed to her first discharge port Cartagena 0n 8/3/77 after loading in Zueitina Lybia I think.
regards stuart

Grymauch
23rd October 2008, 12:07
Hi Stuart.

I could not remember the precise date but that sounds right. I lost much of my Merchant Navy records during several house moves. I should still have my cadet record book with several photos tucked away in the loft somewhere and as soon as I can get hold of them will post some on the gallery.

Prior to the Joule I was on Westbury, Cumbria and Orotava between Feb 1975 and March 1977.

I went with my wife on a cruise a couple of years ago and one of the ports of call was Cartegena. I was looking forward to seeing it again but bad weather prevented us docking. The one port we missed out on!

Regards, Jon Bleasdale

BOB.WHITTAKER
30th December 2008, 23:18
MEMORIES OF THE JOULE (DEFINITELY NOT FOND ONES) :- I joined it at the handing over/flag change dry dock in Cardiff in November 1974.Ownershipwent from P.Meyers to Houlders and flag from Norwegian to British.The ship was a total disaster from stem to stern and top to bottom (What price the Norwegian workings) however the accomodation was good except for the cockroaches that you could saddle. Attempts were made to make something of her ,all three Bergen diesel alts. were clapped out (2x6cyl 1x8cyl),piping for all systems (sewage/sea water/ bilge/steam etc.) was rotten, all engine room auxilaries (bilge/ballast/fuel transfer/blr. feed etc.) were suspect. Much effort was put into the flag change like ensuring the shaving mirrors in crews cabins had adequate illumination and we finaly sailed on christmas eve 1974,I have never been as depressed,either before or since.Harry Donker was on board and left with the pilot,his words as he climbed onto the ladder were "I hate to push you out like this." From memory Les Cuttriss was the captain,Brian Dyson ch.off,John Victor Pegg (Vic) ch.eng,myself 2cnd.eng (Bob Whittaker),Clive Wintle 3rd.eng,Martin Halfpenny 4th.eng,Phil Barlass elec.,a mature junior and two absolute first trippers,the radio opr. was a first tripper who had got his ticket 7 days previous,the crew was off the International Pool in Antwerp made up of Morrocans/Algerians/Spaniards/Argentinians/Chileans et.al. We sailed 20.00 Xmas Eve for Fort Lauderdale in ballast to take bunkers,we broke down 13.00 Xmas Day, after 6 hours we got underway again but just about made Cork in Southern Ireland for 18.00 on Boxing Day where we took on a retired radio opr. with no ticket but who could do the job.It then took some 16-17 days, numerous slowdowns/breakdowns/leaking upper wing ballast tanks etc. etc. to make landfall.We stopped about 20 miles out for manouvering trials prior to taking the pilot,it took about 12 hours to get the engine to restart at all.Whilst moving in a steering motor blew e alongside preparing to bunker some one,having seen all the cruise ships and yachts made the comment "We shouldnt be here we are disaster looking for somewhere to happen".Sure enough when we came to bunker it happened,we had a spill,however it was contained and there was no penalty. We then went to Tampa to gas up the focsle. bottles with ammonia to be able to fridge the cargo tanks and on to Pascagoula to load.Whilst loading the cargo compressors failed the tanks vented up the fore mast and we gassed half of the town.The sheriff arrived and hauled off the captain. This was the pattern for next 4 months.I was finaly strapped in a Robertson stretcher and lowered into a launch heading for hospital having taken a fall off the top of the boiler oil tank up in the funnel .I arrived home with two fractured vertebrae,a lump on my head and two stones lighter than when I left Best regards Bob Whittaker.

non descript
30th December 2008, 23:34
Bob, I would agree with all of your comments - mind you the awfulness of her made me ... so I can forgive her everything; but as for her working, well not really, she merely struggled from port to port, with a reliquifaction system that was designed by Blackadder and maintained by Baldrick (Thumb)

That said I have the findest memories of her and without her I might not have married Mrs Tonga...

ps. Welcome to the Site

Old Bakelite
6th July 2009, 20:11
I joined the Joule in Cartegena in Spain around end Feb/early March 1977 as a deck cadet. I shared the owner's cabin with another cadet but Capt believed it was wrong to double up. As I was the senior cadet (phase 2) my opposite number drew the short straw and was given the sick bay. I could not believe my luck having a seperate bedroom, lounge and en-suite shower all to myself!

I too thought it was a good cabin until the first party in the bar above...did you know that the bar actually came away from the deck if you tried hard enough? It was also the party cabin if they did not want to use the bar, even if you were asleep.

Soon got in line for the next vacancy in the hospital or regular cadet's cabin.

Grymauch
2nd August 2009, 21:16
Old Bakelite - I must have struck it lucky as I cannot recall being disturbed by partying. We did have a particularly aggressive 3rd Engineer from Yorkshire (whose name escapes me) who took great exception to a group of Indian Chiropodists touring the ship whilst alongside in Bombay offering to cut our toenails. I heard loud shouts from above followed by clattering and thuds from outside my cabin. On opening the cabin door I found a mound of Chiropodists at the foot of the stairs with the 3rd Eng screaming at the top for them to **** off the ship. They had clearly disturbed him having his pint!

Old Bakelite
4th August 2009, 21:56
Grymauch, perhaps you were at all the parties and then would not have had to worry about being below:-)

Do you remember that big old hand operated calculator in the cargo room? Never have seen anything else like it and sometimes wonder.

Grymauch
6th August 2009, 21:08
Old B, memory must be fading now cannot particularly recollect the calculator. I can recollect getting a regular gassing! Whenever I get a whiff of ammonia I am immediately transported back to the Joule.

Jon

vasco
6th August 2009, 22:07
Old B, memory must be fading now cannot particularly recollect the calculator. I can recollect getting a regular gassing! Whenever I get a whiff of ammonia I am immediately transported back to the Joule.

Jon

I can't remember it either, perhaps it was a Facit? If so may have looked like this http://www.xnumber.com/xnumber/facit_CM216_CA216.htm

What I do remember is a recipe for disaster. Some of the whessoes were soundings, others ullages.

Vasco

merrymagpie
7th August 2009, 08:25
I can't remember it either, perhaps it was a Facit? If so may have looked like this http://www.xnumber.com/xnumber/facit_CM216_CA216.htm

What I do remember is a recipe for disaster. Some of the whessoes were soundings, others ullages.

Vasco

Definitely a Facit.If I remember right, the SG was 0.68 - seven turns forward and 2 turns back! Also remember the cargo log books (and fridge logs) were huge things and especially having to make a fair copy of the bloody things, usually when they had not been copied up for months!

Mike

vasco
7th August 2009, 09:27
Definitely a Facit.If I remember right, the SG was 0.68 - seven turns forward and 2 turns back! Also remember the cargo log books (and fridge logs) were huge things and especially having to make a fair copy of the bloody things, usually when they had not been copied up for months!

Mike

You are right about the fridge logs, pain, especially as the Mate was on day work (except for the weekends). Now, don't get me started about chipping pipelines and Spanish sailors painting bridge wings all different shades of eau de puke. Like I have said before one of the worst ships I sailed on. Ships like that need the right people to ease the pain, things improved when your old mate Dogsy turned up, he was so entertaining.

John

Old Bakelite
10th August 2009, 19:12
I can't remember it either, perhaps it was a Facit? If so may have looked like this http://www.xnumber.com/xnumber/facit_CM216_CA216.htm

Vasco

Thanks Vasco...I think that is exactly what it was. In those days I was just amazed that it worked.

Ian.