Does anyone remember... Capt Jackie Waters?

Peter Eccleson
8th January 2008, 12:52
Do any of the guys who sailed on Moss tankers remember Capt Jackie Waters and his good lady? I believe she was a police sergeant on Teeside somewhere. sailed with him on the Luminous. He was famed that trip for his string vests and singing his favouriote little 'ditty' ..... " I wonder who's kissing her now? " followed by a comment to the nearest person in earshot with " I wonder what a 'now' is?" Anyone know what happened to him? Happy days! (Scribe)

Pat Thompson
8th January 2008, 13:32
Greetings,

My late Dad (Stepdad), Jack (Hutch) Hutchinson was Mate in a couple of Moss tankers, Lucerna I do remember, with Jackie Waters in the 1950s. I remember visiting him whilst tank cleaning at Howdon and refitting in Smith's Dock North Shields. I am pretty sure Jackies wife and son stayed with us during one summer holiday from school. I also remember Bill Luckie (sic) and engineers Scott-Wall and Christmas. I have a couple of other names on the tip of my tongue and when they come to me I'll post them

Aye

Pat Thompson

You just can't get enough photos of "O'Boats"

Tony Selman
12th January 2008, 12:54
I remember Captain Jackie Waters very well. I did quite a long trip with him on Luxor in 1968 I think (need to check discharge book). He was one of a group of outstanding Masters (in my opinion) that were in Moss Tankers. I sailed with Captains Murray, Mason, Luckey and Waters and would willingly sail anywhere with them again if the situation arose.

I got on very well with Captain Waters and he regularly came into the Radio Room for long chats when I was on watch. He was very friendly but he always struck me as being rather lonely and perhaps personified the loneliness of command. I can recall that he had something of a habit of disagreeing with the second mates estimate of arrival at wherever the next port was, quite often by some considerable distance, but in my experience he was usually right, and he seemed to have an uncanny knack of working out English Channnel currents with the resultant affect on your speed.

I did not sail with his wife but I remember him with affection.

Bill Davies
12th January 2008, 13:02
Tony,
quote:
I can recall that he had something of a habit of disagreeing with the second mates estimate of arrival at wherever the next port was, quite often by some considerable distance, but in my experience he was usually right,
Unquote
Sounds about right. The more 'professional' the Second Mate the more you needed to watch them. Fortunately a rare commodity in FOC.
Bill

Derek Roger
12th January 2008, 16:54
Do any of the guys who sailed on Moss tankers remember Capt Jackie Waters and his good lady? I believe she was a police sergeant on Teeside somewhere. sailed with him on the Luminous. He was famed that trip for his string vests and singing his favouriote little 'ditty' ..... " I wonder who's kissing her now? " followed by a comment to the nearest person in earshot with " I wonder what a 'now' is?" Anyone know what happened to him? Happy days! (Scribe)

Peter I also sailed with him on Luminous in 1973 ;my first trip as Chief Engineer ; was that perchance the same trip ??
We all sat in the radio shack and listened to the FA Cup when Sunderland won .
Regards Derek

seasick
14th January 2008, 12:44
Sailed with Cpt Waters on Lucigen in 1971 as a 2nd trip cadet. All I can say is that if all Masters knew half as much as he did and treated everyone on board like he did the MN would be a much happier career.
Remember his string vests and "empire builder" shorts (Supposedly white).
He had a habit of picking his nose then depositing the contents on the charts. Rumour has it that a new 2nd mate took the said contents of Jackie's nose as a small rock in the Gulf and set courses around it. Cpt Waters was not impressed.
I suppose Jackie has now crossed the bar. I remember him with great fondness. He was a lovely bloke.

Peter Eccleson
15th January 2008, 13:18
All

Thanks for the responses. You really do meet some characters at sea and Jackie was definately amonst the best!
He recalled his first trip to me on a tanker during the war as Fourth mate (?) when she was torpedoed in the North Sea and the stern/aft section sank leaving the bridge and for'd section to be towed into the Tyne for discharge & repair.

Derek - my trip on Luminous was about that time. From what I can recall, we went from the Gulf to Batangas in the Philippines and then to Hong Kong ... was that the same trip?

Derek Roger
15th January 2008, 16:02
All

Thanks for the responses. You really do meet some characters at sea and Jackie was definately amonst the best!
He recalled his first trip to me on a tanker during the war as Fourth mate (?) when she was torpedoed in the North Sea and the stern/aft section sank leaving the bridge and for'd section to be towed into the Tyne for discharge & repair.

Derek - my trip on Luminous was about that time. From what I can recall, we went from the Gulf to Batangas in the Philippines and then to Hong Kong ... was that the same trip?
Probably not Peter ; I signed on Feb 73 @ Ras Tanura and signed off October 73 in Bahrain
Derek

Peter Eccleson
15th January 2008, 17:25
Derek

I'll check my discharge book and see if I can confirm dates.

R781128
18th July 2008, 21:13
If you sailed with Jack you would certainly not forget.

Gladis rarely sailed with us but when she did we had a changed Jack as well.

We sailed together when I was second and chief officer for quite a long time over the years and I also recall the night clinging to the short wave radio as Sunderland (his 3rd love) won the cup.

The other contributors have said it all.

Cunarder
21st July 2008, 01:10
I believe I also sailed with Jack on Lucigen/GKGE in '69 when we were doing the Mobil charter on the South African coast. A great guy I seem to remember...

Derek Roger
21st July 2008, 02:07
Known as " Wackie Jackie " A splendid man and a fine Captain ; I was happy to sail with him . I have a few other stories but that will have to await another day .

Kind Regards Derek

Derek Roger
21st July 2008, 02:09
Tony,
quote:
I can recall that he had something of a habit of disagreeing with the second mates estimate of arrival at wherever the next port was, quite often by some considerable distance, but in my experience he was usually right,
Unquote
Sounds about right. The more 'professional' the Second Mate the more you needed to watch them. Fortunately a rare commodity in FOC.
Bill

Bill I thoiught you were Blue Flue ??? Didnt know you sailed with Moss Tankers ???????????? Are you sure you have it right ??


Cheers Derek

Ron Hamilton
30th July 2008, 12:32
I sailed as A.B. with Capt. Waters in 1950 on the old Luminetta, & it turned to be one those trips of which I keep intending to write about . It was quite horrific & hilarious at times & we were eventually ordered by Lloyds to return home after temporary repairs in Dakar to the boilers . During a prolonged stay in that port , I wont go into details but Jackie had a great time & in the process of entertaining his 'guests' they staggered ashore carrying large parcels which turned out to be our sweet rations which crew members with kids particularly prized to take home in those days of rationing & in consequence the cupboard was bare when we left there for home . It was a particularly hard trip for the Liverpool engine room crowd & there was an ugly scene at the shipping office when they tried to make a complaint to the Shipping Master at the pay-off & it was perhaps well for Jackie he had the protection of a grille . My impressions were he was a selfish man & a trifle uncouth . It all depends where you are viewing a person from I suppose . Ron

Derek Roger
1st August 2008, 03:20
Bill I thoiught you were Blue Flue ??? Didnt know you sailed with Moss Tankers ???????????? Are you sure you have it right ??


Cheers Derek

Bill I think a reply is in order if you have one ????????? Derek

Derek Roger
1st August 2008, 03:24
I sailed as A.B. with Capt. Waters in 1950 on the old Luminetta, & it turned to be one those trips of which I keep intending to write about . It was quite horrific & hilarious at times & we were eventually ordered by Lloyds to return home after temporary repairs in Dakar to the boilers . During a prolonged stay in that port , I wont go into details but Jackie had a great time & in the process of entertaining his 'guests' they staggered ashore carrying large parcels which turned out to be our sweet rations which crew members with kids particularly prized to take home in those days of rationing & in consequence the cupboard was bare when we left there for home . It was a particularly hard trip for the Liverpool engine room crowd & there was an ugly scene at the shipping office when they tried to make a complaint to the Shipping Master at the pay-off & it was perhaps well for Jackie he had the protection of a grille . My impressions were he was a selfish man & a trifle uncouth . It all depends where you are viewing a person from I suppose . Ron

Ron ;
You may well be right however my experiance
was somewhat different . I found him to be a man of great humor and a very fine "Skipper ' Derek

Peter Eccleson
13th August 2008, 11:19
Ron
Sad tale of Jackie but perhaps he changed with age and experience. Most of the memories recorded above are fond ones but I guess all of us have a 'dark side'.
I am pleased to say all of my memories reflect most of the views above... one of life's large characters who made an interesting and lasting impression on my time at sea. Like the website title says .... Ships Nostalgia.