Independence

Jan Hendrik
7th May 2005, 07:18
Also called the "Indy"
GRT 29,500 sister to s/s Constitution - American Export Lines
Italy/France/New York Passenger Services.
Built by Bethlehem Steel 1950 GRT 23719 682 ft abt 1000 passengers.

Refurbished in 1959 and tonnage increased a bit.

Refurbished another time in 1974 and the tonnage kept changing, also changed to 750 pass.

A whole intriguing story evolved and you can read all about it at:

http://www.maritimematters.com/independence.html

Apparently the vessel is now berthed at Pier 70 in San Fransisco.
Anybody with more details apart from what is written in the above site?

Found this postcard in my collection.

Jeff Taylor
23rd October 2006, 20:31
She was purchased by NCL, along with the United States, as part of their scam to get around the Jones Act and provide inter-island cruises in Hawaii. They claimed they were planning to refurbish her for that purpose, but now claim she's in poor condition and may not be suitable. What a surprise!

david
24th October 2006, 01:04
Jan Hendrik,
She is still there.
Saw those 2 Funnels with the amazing colors when we went to SFO about 6 weeks ago.
Don't know any more.
Regards
David D.

Kolby
8th August 2008, 05:56
If im not mistaken, NCL-Star(Cruises) said recently, (at one point) that the Independence was in good condition! Correct me if im worng. Ive been known to be, so...

Thanks

Lksimcoe
8th August 2008, 14:34
The Independance left San Fran a few months ago, and is rumoured to be laid up near Dubai looking for new owners. Chances are they're just waiting for the heat to settle, and she'll beach at Alang. Another website has photos of her leaving San Francisco. Not sure if I can mention the other website, but it's www.maritimematters.com Just go to the photo gallery and scroll down.

Moderators. If I've broken a rule, please feel free to remove the link and accept my apologies.

Sun Viking
6th December 2008, 15:34
Hi All - The "Indy" & "Connie" were two of my all-time favorites. Sailed on both in Hawaii and was so impressed with their 50's design and style. Nice touches of Hawaiian decor added just the right touch. The Princess Grace Library onboard the Constitution was a most relaxing space to read a good book on those sea-days between ports. At last reports the "Indie" is in Taiwan awaiting a scrap yard. At least the "Connie" had the good luck to roll over & sink in a storm on her way to the scrappers! - Sun Viking

Dickyboy
13th August 2009, 07:48
Anyone any idea why The Indy & Connie had those Counter Sterns? In my book they look totally out of place on otherwise modern looking post war liners.
Cheers!
Dickyboy

Stephen J. Card
17th August 2009, 10:16
Anyone any idea why The Indy & Connie had those Counter Sterns? In my book they look totally out of place on otherwise modern looking post war liners.
Cheers!
Dickyboy



To be strictly correct these two ship had cruiser sterns... with an old fashioned counter stern above.

On a real counter stern the stern post and upper part of the unbalanced rudder are well exposed exposed above the water with an overhang above. On CONNIE and INDY the stern shape is 'cruiser' with a balanced rudder, well submerged.

A traditional counter stern would be found on OLYMPIC for example.

The earliest example of the combined cruiser and counter that I know of is on MAURETANIA and LUSITANIA.

But why the designers chose this arrangement for two new ships in the early 1950s is beyond imagination. I suspect the dessign gives the ship a bit extra waterline length as well as aa finer run aft. I guess it worked in the tank tests. Does not look so bad with a black hull but looks most out of place when painted white. In ther original configuration and colours they were very handsome ships.

Dickyboy
19th August 2009, 04:39
To be strictly correct these two ship had cruiser sterns... with an old fashioned counter stern above.

On a real counter stern the stern post and upper part of the unbalanced rudder are well exposed exposed above the water with an overhang above. On CONNIE and INDY the stern shape is 'cruiser' with a balanced rudder, well submerged.

A traditional counter stern would be found on OLYMPIC for example.

The earliest example of the combined cruiser and counter that I know of is on MAURETANIA and LUSITANIA.

But why the designers chose this arrangement for two new ships in the early 1950s is beyond imagination. I suspect the dessign gives the ship a bit extra waterline length as well as aa finer run aft. I guess it worked in the tank tests. Does not look so bad with a black hull but looks most out of place when painted white. In ther original configuration and colours they were very handsome ships.
I live and learn :o
I always thought, though not too much about it, that ships like the Queen Mary, Queen Elizabeth, to name a couple, had cruiser sterns, and a Counter stern basically was an overhanging stern.
Actually, I was wondering, the opposite to you, whether the sterns on those two ships might have given them a longer Main Deck length than with a traditional Counter stern?
All in all though, nice looking ships.(Thumb)

Alistair Macnab
20th January 2010, 17:01
Somewhat late in the day because I have just come across this thread, I can add that American Export Lines had a fetish about 'counter sterns'. They had it on their cargo ships, too as well as the "Four Aces" the passenger-cargo ships they employed to the Eastern Mediterranean.
Call it a corporate trade mark!