Japan

Tai Pan
18th February 2008, 15:29
We used to say knee high women and ass high beer (Ashai). also Corio whiskey, this was known as COR 10. (COR being commonwealth oil refinery).

Trevorw
18th February 2008, 18:03
We also said, "Moshi moshi", when we answered the 'phone there, whilst sipping a glass of Suntory!

Tai Pan
19th February 2008, 15:12
remember the song, literal translation ana koka wie, the cam cam munsi may

oceangoer
19th February 2008, 22:20
We used to say knee high women and ass high beer (Ashai). also Corio whiskey, this was known as COR 10. (COR being commonwealth oil refinery).

I think you'll find that the whisky was/is Suntory. Corio came from Australia.

Tai Pan
20th February 2008, 14:58
Thats correct, bring the memory back, mixing up ships. Cor 10 was a bit raw if I remeber correctly.

trotterdotpom
21st February 2008, 01:49
The Corio distillery was in Geelong, Victoria, presumeably named after Corio Bay, or vice versa. Apparently it closed in 1980 but I'm sure I recall seeing Corio Rum after that time - don't know who was making that.

John T.

dom
21st February 2008, 07:36
along with the Hermes,Ocean and other labels of gin whisky etc.

BA204259
21st February 2008, 12:45
Ran between Aussie and various ports in Japan for a year. I remember Asahi beer (you can buy it in Tesco now). If I remember correctly Asahi means "Rising Sun". I also remember Tory whiskey and the slightly more expensive Suntory. I also have faint memories (but don't ask me why) that around 99% of the girls I met were called Mariko. Not that I met that many you understand.....I'm sure I had more important things on my mind when I was 21 or 22.[=P]

On a slightly higher plane, I have some wonderful memories of sailing up the Inland Sea, especially at night. Lovely.

PS. Ports I remember.... Moji, Kobe, Yokohama, Wakayama, Kamaishi. I'm sure two or three more that I can't remember at the moment. Ring any bells?

Tai Pan
21st February 2008, 15:03
what about Shimitzu, loaded tins oranges, row of bars alongside harbour, 4th Mate decided to go for a swim, tide out, covered in mud. hot saki on a cold night around a fire in middle of floor, dont remeber Mariko

BA204259
21st February 2008, 15:48
I remember being touted to try various bars where the first bottle of Suntory was on the house. Then we'd move on. Freezing cold winters, like you say huddled round a charcoal brazier in the middle of the bar floor. Toilets - a hole in the floor - you didn't want to look down into the sewer, that's for sure. I remember a junior engineer on his knees with a policeman holding a submachine gun to his head, all because he wanted a couple of the bar's glasses for a souvenir.

John Power
21st February 2008, 16:50
I seem to recall a whiskey being marketed in Japan in the 70s by a Scottish distiller. Sounded something like 'Tallisker'.

trotterdotpom
22nd February 2008, 00:26
There is a "Talisker" whisky but it would have been pretty hard for the average Japanese salaryman to ask for with his head lying on the bar!

I recall hearing that Suntory imported Scottish water to use in their distillery - can anyone confirm that. "Distillery" would be even harder than "Talisker" for the Japanese to pronounce!

For some reason, Shimizu on the Inland Sea came to my mind this morning. I'd heard that it was the closest port to Mt Fuji but was taken aback one day when the smog cleared and I just happened to look up - there was the mountain looming right over me in all it's glory, breathtaking! One of my favourite memories.

John T.

Derek Roger
22nd February 2008, 01:11
My understanding is that Suntory is a very old company who have been making fine whiskey for a very long time .
It is also my understanding that it was created by a Scot .
I have tried Google but cannot find anything useful .

I do know that there was a "Superior " brand called Suntory Imperial .
When in Japan I tried to get a bottle through our agents but was told it was only for the Imperial Palace and Embassy's .

On a trip home from Tokyo at the Duty Free I saw a bottle on a high shelf and asked if I could buy it . Hi ! ( yes ) of course !

I did buy it and it wasn't too expensive and took it home for my late father .

It was First Class and we used to have a " we dram at new year " only one each . It lasted a long time and I must say I have not tasted better ( bearing in mind I spent all my leaves fishing the Spey and sampling the joys of the Malts it is not as if I hadn,t had a chance to compare .

The best " day to day " Japanese Whiskey was Suntroy Old which was similar to Bells for those who are Scotch drinkers .


Cheers Derek

Tai Pan
24th February 2008, 12:43
China Tea sets was another buy, cost about 1. came in a wooden box about a foot square. impossible to repack once opened. I still have mine, intact. held the bottom of a cup to the light and if you could see daylight it was supposed to be good quality.

BA204259
24th February 2008, 13:06
Yes, it wasn't all filth and lust, was it? [=P]
Binoculars.. all the mates bought some Fuji binoculars. They all reckoned the lenses were a good equal of the British and German ones on the ship. So I bought a pair for my Dad, cost 5. I was interested in photography so I bought a Canon Canonet, all the rage then. Cost me the equivalent of 17 including a solid leather case. First thing I did when I got back to UK was check the prices here.... 44 plus another substantial amount for the case. Wonderful place for shopping then, it was 1,000 yen to the pound.

trotterdotpom
24th February 2008, 13:46
China Tea sets was another buy, cost about 1. came in a wooden box about a foot square. impossible to repack once opened. I still have mine, intact. held the bottom of a cup to the light and if you could see daylight it was supposed to be good quality.

The Noritake teasets from near Nagoya were guaranteed to arrive intact if left in the box - if they didn't they would replace broken item free of charge. If you held the cups up to the light you could see the image of a Geisha in the bottom. I sent a couple home, wish I'd kept one now, even though tea is kid's stuff.

John T.

mcgurggle
24th February 2008, 18:27
The Noritake teasets from near Nagoya were guaranteed to arrive intact if left in the box - if they didn't they would replace broken item free of charge. If you held the cups up to the light you could see the image of a Geisha in the bottom. I sent a couple home, wish I'd kept one now, even though tea is kid's stuff.

John T.

I've still got my Tea Set with the Geisha in the bottoms (minus the teapot) sold to me by Mr Teddy Bear in Yokohama.
I remember we were one of the first vessels in Fukuyama & although my hair was 'dirty fair', all the young ladies called me 'blondie'....I'm a proper blondie now. Grey!!
McG

Graham McMorine
14th March 2008, 18:50
Still have both the tea sets I brought home,one for the wife and one for Mum & Dad ( both now over the bar ). All intact and full sets.

Other ports I remember are Oturu, Nagoya, great places that left many fond memories.

Regards Gra.(Thumb)

albert.s.i
18th March 2008, 12:52
hi lads,i was in a place called muji 1949 japan was occupied by america with 9oclock cerfew on so we had to be back onboard at 9 i met a girl in this beer house we were drinking in was a bit late getting back it was dark so me and the girl were walking close to the storage hangers along the dockside got just a few metres off the ship when the head lights of a yanky jeep flashed on us the officer asked what i was doing i told him intentions was to take her aboard the ship he just said be quick about it and that was me fixed for the night we were there 7 days then we left for panama and after 18 days i discovered she gave a present only a doctor could relieve me of and it took some getting rid of believe me it would take to long to explain. cheers albert.s.i

baileysan
18th March 2008, 23:10
A place was pointed out to me (by a Japanese) whilst on the shinkansen between Kobe and Osaka which was an old Suntory distillery. It was on a hillside with a stream running down the hill. Apparently stones, earth and peat(!!!) were brought from Scotland to try and create similar water conditions. This was often agreed by many other Japanese whom I met but I never found out if it was actual fact. The Japanese were always good at copying. Some of the later Santory whiskey was really very good. I never got a taste for Black Nikka, pretty rough.

Bill Davies
18th March 2008, 23:26
Some of the top of the range Suntory's were excellent although none compared a Jameson 'Redbreast'. Looking at the River Dodder on my last visit to Dublin I don't think the Japanese would want to import any of that.

Derek Roger
19th March 2008, 00:58
A place was pointed out to me (by a Japanese) whilst on the shinkansen between Kobe and Osaka which was an old Suntory distillery. It was on a hillside with a stream running down the hill. Apparently stones, earth and peat(!!!) were brought from Scotland to try and create similar water conditions. This was often agreed by many other Japanese whom I met but I never found out if it was actual fact. The Japanese were always good at copying. Some of the later Santory whiskey was really very good. I never got a taste for Black Nikka, pretty rough.

I was given a bottle of Black Nikka after a shore repair . It was terrible stuff ; not worth drinking . Sat on my bar for months ; left it to my relief !


Happy Days Derek

John Rogers
19th March 2008, 01:09
I read years ago in a magazine that Japanese were in Scotland learning the art of making scotch.

Funny about the teasets,the other day I asked the wife why she never uses the good china teasets, the real silver,and crystal glasses,I said lets start using it we have only had it 52 years,you can guess the answer,No! Im saving it she says,
then I said I would get my next wife to use and that started world war three. One day when she is out shopping I will pour myself a tall one in our fancy glasses.

John.

Bill Davies
21st March 2008, 00:41
Interesting post John but perhaps the Japanese should have tried Ireland as it was people from that land who discovered the art and passed it on to the Scots (another thread??)

Sister Eleff
21st March 2008, 01:00
Bill you must be expecting some 'incoming' for that remark - surely it's the other way around (==D) (==D)

Derek Roger
21st March 2008, 01:16
Bill you must be expecting some 'incoming' for that remark - surely it's the other way around (==D) (==D)

Either way Sis ; the Scots and Japanese got it right !.

There is a place in Cape Breton Nova Scotia which makes a Single Malt but it is not very good at all ( or was not about 5 years ago )
They intended to import barley from Scotland to see if it would improve . Their water seemed to be OK but with little or no peat content .



Derek

spongebob
21st March 2008, 01:18
John, there was a recent excellent article in our local paper titled

"Life is too short not to use the best china".

It went onto remind us of the crystal wine glasses, the cut glass salad bowl, the silver teapot and all the heirloom bits and pieces cluttering up the china cabinet.
It was a good tongue in cheek render that made the point that what was the use of the finer things in life if you did not use or indulge in them. It was certainly a reminder to this household dust them off, wallow in their finery and live it up.
Your beneficiaries will do it if you don't

surfaceblow
21st March 2008, 01:32
Just do not drink a lot from very old cut crystal. Too much lead in some of the old sets. One set I have has way to much lead in it to be used.

Bill Davies
21st March 2008, 01:41
Sister Eleff,
Sure, I am expecting some incoming but that is what it is all about.
I do believe that the Irish discovered the art of distilling whisky

Sister Eleff
21st March 2008, 02:12
Bill, I must admit I do enjoy both the Irish whiskey & the Scotch whisky - just opened a fine bottle of Laphroaig yesterday and will drink a toast to you next time we have one (Pint)

Bill Davies
21st March 2008, 12:17
Sister Eleff,
I can see you are high maintenance!
Cheers!

Bill

John Briggs
22nd March 2008, 00:56
It was my bloody Laphroaig that she opened!!!!!

notnila
22nd March 2008, 02:08
The trouble is that we all remember Japan"as it was",and I'm sure we all harbour pipedreams of returning to our old haunts.Unfortunately today,most of us would probably have to remortgage the house to do so.Maybe it's better to remember the days when THEY paid US to go there!

oceangoer
22nd March 2008, 02:18
The trouble is that we all remember Japan"as it was". Unfortunately today,most of us would probably have to remortgage the house to do so.

Actually the cost is not that bad. last year I spent a couple of weeks split between Otaru and Kobe. If you're prepared to travel by bus and stay in 2 star hotels (clean and comfortable) then it's much cheaper than Britain. Kobe cost me US$ 51 per night close to Sannomiya station, the bars are still there, Kobe beef is reasonable and okinomiyaki makes a cheap lunch. Tours round the docks and up the mountain. It's still a sailors town.

Tai Pan
22nd March 2008, 12:11
sounds as if the all night bath and massage would be cheaper!

Bill Davies
22nd March 2008, 12:18
Quote: notnilla: The trouble is that we all remember Japan"as it was",and I'm sure we all harbour pipedreams of returning to our old haunts.Unfortunately today,most of us would probably have to remortgage the house to do so.Maybe it's better to remember the days when THEY paid US to go there!Unquote:

Good point. I visit Hong Kong last year after a long abstinence. Not the same.

R651400
23rd March 2008, 08:08
I was lucky to have the opportunity to work in Japan from '79 to '82 and even then it was very expensive if one went down the "Tokyo Plaza" route.
There are however almost in every Japanese town even Tokyo, traditional hotels called "ryokans" which were relatively inexpensive and well worth the experience.
My memory of a lovely ryokan stay in a Kyoto was the remark in the visitors book. "Kyoto is a very beautiful city but after a few days, I feel I've been templed to death."

BA204259
23rd March 2008, 12:16
sounds as if the all night bath and massage would be cheaper!

If I remember correctly and I'm sure I do (just for a change), the going rate in '63 was 5000 yen, at the then going rate of 1 = 1,000 yen. Hearsay, you understand, just hearsay....[=P] (EEK)

Tai Pan
23rd March 2008, 12:42
As Trevor will confirm, Glengarry's Chief Officer was the king of the massage parlours. I used to accompany him , some times three different establishments in one evening. I was only the minder of course and very innocent, although my skin still shines to this day.