Glorius Food!

Peter Martin
6th March 2008, 09:28
Egusi stew with yam flour foofoo, jollof rice, palm oil chop..Does anybody have memories of other delicacies we enjoyed years ago?

Chris Isaac
6th March 2008, 11:03
Cat sick sandwiches in the Bridge supper box

K urgess
6th March 2008, 17:15
They were "dog spew" in Hungry Hogarth's. [=P]
Every night for the whole trip.
Wrapped in greaseproof paper.
Still can't abide the stuff.

Roger Turner
10th March 2008, 23:54
Actually, Elders and Paddy Hendersons were my only companies, so I cannot compare with what others provided, although I did have one meal in Birkenhead on the Clan McTaggart in my training days. that and it wasn`t long after the war, was fairly sumptuous, also my lifelong introduction to and loving of curry.
Paddy`s wasn`t too bad if you liked curry (3 times a day, if you included Kegeree for breakfast)
Elders Palm Oil Chop and Groundnut Stew I loved, but it was probably the booze which preceded it, oiled the works (The African crowd got pepper soup, if they were unlucky trhe only part of the chicken it contained was the legs,claw end) I remember particular delicacies like "Kromeskie a la Russe" and it was always "Bury" Black pudding - don`t know why, when I subsequently found out the best black pudding in the world came from the butcher in Aviemore, Bologna Sausage "sarnies" were awful, but sometimes the Chief Steward got hold of Crayfish or Red Snapper.
Used to like the side dishes that went with curry and palm oil chop etc, especially the little tomato things - I think they called them red chilli peppers!
Feeding generally depended on what was available and the Chief Steward and most were reasonable feeders - the rum ration did help everything down though!
Main benefit after leaving Elders was never had tummy trouble, used to reckon the African Cooks had poisoned us enough to give us future immunity.

trotterdotpom
11th March 2008, 01:12
The claw in the soup was probably strong ju-ju! This interesting topic is also covered extensively in "Merchant Navy Fare" and "BP Culinary Delights". Kromeski a la Russe seems to feature in all our memories although I don't recall seeing one in Murmansk!

John T.

WilliamH
17th March 2008, 10:02
I was on the Patani (2 trips) in the mid 60's. The officers used to chip in 1 each and the Chief Steward, I think his name was Jack Holland, used to buy fresh dover sole in Las Palmas, these fish simply grilled on the bone were out of this world, they hung over both ends of a dinner plate. I think the C.S must have had a contact in the wholsale fish business because he could also get large fresh prawns while in Las Palmas which no other C.S in E.D's seemed able to do.

Burned Toast
17th March 2008, 12:32
Sandwitch Spead Sarni and pilchards in Tomato were great wrapped in greasproof paper, bread rock hard after a couple of hours. You lads were spoiled!!![=P]

Roger Turner
17th March 2008, 22:34
Talking of Prawns
Can`t remember which ship,may have been the "Oti" but called at Fernando Po, tied up alongside a trawler and the Chief Steward (think he was Stan Fowler) bought a bucket of prawns, had the cook cook them and organised a party in the Chief Engineers accommodation at midnight, sat round in a circle, bucket of prawns, waste paper basket, case of Worthington - brilliant party,C/E had put us all on a shake, one lad had the most amazing stutter and said to the Chief "It`s not your birthday chief it`s a f f fffffff............ing piss up chief" - funny how his stutter disappeared as the evening wore on.

Cornishman
27th April 2008, 23:03
It was traditional for EDs to have Roast Norfolk Turkey and chipolatas for Sunday lunch. A J/E, time served in a Lancashire mill town and used to sandwiches for his lunch, is reputed to have observed of ED chop, and in broad Lancastrian, 'Eh! Christmas Dinner on a Sunday; Sunday dinners every day!'

On another tack, there was a Chief Steward known as 'Bring 'em Back Alive' Kelly. This apparently a result of complaints about his feeding and his response to enquiries at the end of voyage interview - 'Well. I brought 'em back alive, didn't I?'. From experience, when coasting the Kabala, he spent the allotted 10/- per man per day, but there was nothing special in the fare or its presentation.

I've forgotten what comprised Kromeski a la Russe, but it did spawn a universal description for any of the more unusual details of maritime life as being 'very kromesk'.

Peter Martin
28th April 2008, 09:07
It was traditional for EDs to have Roast Norfolk Turkey and chipolatas for Sunday lunch. A J/E, time served in a Lancashire mill town and used to sandwiches for his lunch, is reputed to have observed of ED chop, and in broad Lancastrian, 'Eh! Christmas Dinner on a Sunday; Sunday dinners every day!'

On another tack, there was a Chief Steward known as 'Bring 'em Back Alive' Kelly. This apparently a result of complaints about his feeding and his response to enquiries at the end of voyage interview - 'Well. I brought 'em back alive, didn't I?'. From experience, when coasting the Kabala, he spent the allotted 10/- per man per day, but there was nothing special in the fare or its presentation.

I've forgotten what comprised Kromeski a la Russe, but it did spawn a universal description for any of the more unusual details of maritime life as being 'very kromesk'.

Kromeski a la Russe - Something about sausages wrapped in bacon and roasted - or were they 'battered' and deep fried? The mists of time.....

spongebob
28th April 2008, 09:57
We had a cook that was only fair to middling most of the time and very below par when in our home port.
He was , however very good at a chicken chow mien and used to serve this for dinner the first night back at sea.
It was very popular and many asked for seconds with the result being that the second mate and I would come into the saloon late after doing our meal reliefs for the mate and second engineer to find barely a single serve left for us.

The next trip the second mate rang me from the bridge to say
"Bob there will be plenty of chow mien left over tonight, I have just put my head in the saloon door and told them the one about"--(A rather crude joke that was sure to put those with a delicate stomachs, especially during those first few hours at sea, right off their tucker)

Yes it worked and we enjoyed our double helpings

degsy
22nd June 2008, 20:43
I remeber on the Onitsha a Chief Steward called John Martin, We reckoned he had 5 Hatch filled with potato salad . Ther all ways seemed to be tons of it . They would throw walnuts in it for Waldorf Salad pineapple for Hawaian and red and green peppers for Mexicaine. Another speciality was Salad Bretonne (BAKED BEANS !) . Mind you I was an egg & chip Junior Engineer so I never complained , me face was always to close to the plate. Soup, entree , main course , cold meat an salad and then a pudding. I have yet to meet a women who could feed me like that , God bless a good Chief Steward say I.
Degsy

Degema
23rd June 2008, 22:38
What about Scouse stew!

degsy
23rd August 2008, 16:30
I was on the Patani (2 trips) in the mid 60's. The officers used to chip in 1 each and the Chief Steward, I think his name was Jack Holland, used to buy fresh dover sole in Las Palmas, these fish simply grilled on the bone were out of this world, they hung over both ends of a dinner plate. I think the C.S must have had a contact in the wholsale fish business because he could also get large fresh prawns while in Las Palmas which no other C.S in E.D's seemed able to do.
Could the Chief Stewards name have been Jack Mulholland , he was a Scouser, and one of the best grocers I ever sailed with. (Thumb)

WilliamH
24th August 2008, 08:32
Could the Chief Stewards name have been Jack Mulholland , he was a Scouser, and one of the best grocers I ever sailed with. (Thumb)

Thats right degsy, we used to call him "grocer jack", there was a song very popular at the time with the line "grocer jack get off your back, go into town, don't let them down". I think the song was called " from a tean age opera"
Like you I would say he was probably one of the best feeder I ever sailed with.

secondcook
1st September 2008, 14:39
recipe for today FOFAR BRIDIES rough mince beef/onions/carrot /plenty pepper/wrapped in short pastry folded flat, baked in oven ,served with mash /peas and onion gravey/ yum lick your lips.

secondcook
6th September 2008, 20:51
recipe for the weekend- Corned beef stovies-sliced onions sweated down/large dice tatties gentley simmered/loads of pepper/dice corned beef added in last 10-15 minutes, yum-yum lick your lips

secondcook
7th September 2008, 16:52
Kromeski a la Russe - Something about sausages wrapped in bacon and roasted - or were they 'battered' and deep fried? The mists of time.....

second cook knows--cooked second hand sausage wrapped round with bacon /battered /deep fried/served with homemade thick tomatoe sauce.Was agood alternative to greasy spam -yuk-fritters(Thumb)

Peter Martin
7th September 2008, 23:16
Second Cook? In my book "Chief Cook"; Had a go at the Kromeskies at lunch time today - a triumph. Gone are the days of "Can't cook. Won't cook" for me! At least in the eyes of the Lady Wife!!
Any thoughts on "Palm Fruit Sundae"?

R798780
7th September 2008, 23:30
Brock ships, leaving Mukalla in the Gulf of Aden, would usually have acquired some crayfish. The Chief Cook ( Bengali crews) would produce a curry with these "chingli". I do not normally care for fish curry, but this one with crayfish was to die for. If someone could turn the clocks back that is one experience to revisit.

degsy
10th September 2008, 23:01
Thats right degsy, we used to call him "grocer jack", there was a song very popular at the time with the line "grocer jack get off your back, go into town, don't let them down". I think the song was called " from a tean age opera"
Like you I would say he was probably one of the best feeder I ever sailed with.

I well remember Jack, a privelige to have sailed with him. Talking of songs, Jack, whilist not being a Duane Eddy, could none the less handle a guitar. I remember one night in the Onitsha bar him treating us to a favourite from his grande repetoire. Lyrics below
We had a Tom cat his name was Ben
He had nine A###holes, F###ing near ten
He'd S##t all around the room of a night
And the green grass grew all around it
Oh! you take the poker I'll take the broom
We'll chase Sh###y A##e all around the room
He would'nt eat pie an he would'nt eat crust
But he'd eat rice pudding till he F###ing near Bust.

Then the refrain
Oh! star of the evening shining on the one I love
Star of the evening shining on our Sh##house door
Please dont pull our Sh##house down
Mother said she'd pay
If you pull our Sh##house down
We'll have no place to stay.

I can see Jack now in my mind's, pushing his glasses back up his nose whilst he strummed the guitar. Imagine if you can a balmy night on the West Coast of Africa . A beautiful Sunset, and Jack's melodious voice carrying to the African shore. It would have brought a tear to a glass eye, not a dry eye in the house. Happy Days(Jester) (Jester) (Thumb)

Peter Martin
11th September 2008, 19:18
Can you remember the yune this was sung to? I'd really like to have a go at it!

degsy
11th September 2008, 20:14
Can you remember the yune this was sung to? I'd really like to have a go at it!

Unfortunately I cant recollect the tune, I think it was just a song that had been hashed together. It meant allot to Jack he always became emotional when he sang it. It was either the song or the Tennants. (Pint) (Jester)

orcades
6th October 2008, 03:21
Egusi stew with yam flour foofoo, jollof rice, palm oil chop..Does anybody have memories of other delicacies we enjoyed years ago?

Yes happy memories of palm oil chop washed down with large quantities of gin,much looked forward to. I was sailing on the Winnebar at the time.[=P]

Steve Woodward
6th October 2008, 18:11
Sandwitch Spead Sarni and pilchards in Tomato were great wrapped in greasproof paper, bread rock hard after a couple of hours. You lads were spoiled!!![=P]

Ooh how I remember those sarnies BT (Jester)

Burned Toast
16th October 2008, 11:28
Brings back the memories eh Steve(Smoke) Give them plenty one between twenty(Thumb)

ed glover
16th October 2008, 14:24
I sailed out of the Clyde on the Dalla (Paddy Henderson) on her maiden voyage. I remember lunch was a curry thought I had died and gone to heaven. I thought all E.D. and Paddy H ships were great feeders. was on the Kindat the Chief Steward was a great big man he could not get into his bunk he had a photo of himself and his wife and his hand was bigger than her head. his pants belt was about 61/2 to 7 feet long.he fed us well.have not had palm oil chop or groundnut stew in 40 odd years but would love some anytime.

Ed Glover
Controlled drifting

csturnbull
2nd April 2010, 21:32
Talking of Prawns
Can`t remember which ship,may have been the "Oti" but called at Fernando Po, tied up alongside a trawler and the Chief Steward (think he was Stan Fowler) bought a bucket of prawns, had the cook cook them and organised a party in the Chief Engineers accommodation at midnight, sat round in a circle, bucket of prawns, waste paper basket, case of Worthington - brilliant party,C/E had put us all on a shake, one lad had the most amazing stutter and said to the Chief "It`s not your birthday chief it`s a f f fffffff............ing piss up chief" - funny how his stutter disappeared as the evening wore on.
It was Stan (one eye) Fowler I once went ashore with in Port Harcourt. We nearly got murdered! Great guy but somewhat belligerent when he had supped a few, after which he would start to question the parenthood of the locals! It didn't take long to realize why nobody else wanted to come ashore as well! I too think this was the Oti. Chief Engineer was Vince Taylor.
Think Stan was known as "Fowler the Feeder"
Jolt any memories?

eldersuk
3rd April 2010, 01:36
I well remember Jack, a privelige to have sailed with him. Talking of songs, Jack, whilist not being a Duane Eddy, could none the less handle a guitar. I remember one night in the Onitsha bar him treating us to a favourite from his grande repetoire. Lyrics below
We had a Tom cat his name was Ben
He had nine A###holes, F###ing near ten
He'd S##t all around the room of a night
And the green grass grew all around it
Oh! you take the poker I'll take the broom
We'll chase Sh###y A##e all around the room
He would'nt eat pie an he would'nt eat crust
But he'd eat rice pudding till he F###ing near Bust.

Then the refrain
Oh! star of the evening shining on the one I love
Star of the evening shining on our Sh##house door
Please dont pull our Sh##house down
Mother said she'd pay
If you pull our Sh##house down
We'll have no place to stay.

I can see Jack now in my mind's, pushing his glasses back up his nose whilst he strummed the guitar. Imagine if you can a balmy night on the West Coast of Africa . A beautiful Sunset, and Jack's melodious voice carrying to the African shore. It would have brought a tear to a glass eye, not a dry eye in the house. Happy Days(Jester) (Jester) (Thumb)

jack will probably be at the ED's Annual Lunch in Liverppol in June. If you (or anyone else) are interested in attending, give me a PM. Derek

clibb
3rd April 2010, 18:57
Wasn't it Stan Fowler who use to leave his glass eye on the counter in the galley, together with his false teeth, and say the eye would watch the Chief Cook, and his teeth would tell him what went on ? For those who sailed on Paddy Henderson's ships with Burmese crews, the 'dish to die for' was Kau Shwei (not sure of the spelling) but I do remember being in Glasgow, and having various dockyard mateys finding reasons to be onboard when this was on the menu.

Nick C

eldersuk
4th April 2010, 02:09
On the Eboe we had Charlie Howard, once known as Minister of Chop for Calabar. A new delicacy appeared on the breakfast menu - Split Sausage. We had visions of plump sausages split and stuffed with maybe mushrooms or herbs and exotic spices.
No such luck, he split the sausage and we got half a sausage each!

On another ship the OM enquired of the steward what sort of soup was on.
Mushroom came the reply. On tasting his soup the OM said, "This is chicken, don't you know the difference between a chicken and a mushroom?"
"Yessir, chicken has two legs, mushroom only has one."

Derek

omcgarry
4th April 2010, 14:12
Ok for you lot ! but what is a " Palm Oil Chop" (A

Norm
6th January 2011, 06:34
Getting back on course for the West Coast...what about pepper pot soup and ready made garri. Yams and plantain. "White man chop plenty, but no power"
" go chop for power". I recall buying some river prawns from a canoe, and when they were cooked they tasted like......mud. First time there, a man paddled up on a canoe and asked me if I wanted to buy a hot drink, what Bovril, cocoa ?? No..whiskey bottle. (Mansion House Whiskey, never heard of it) going cheap so I bought and drank. Ever tried paddling those canoes? Not easy, I tipped over many times much to the amusement of various piccins.

Norm
8th January 2011, 00:44
Ever drank Kai-Kai? Lovely drink, gets right into the joints of your bones. They tap the sap of palm trees and distil it..dont look too closely at the process. Our boys sometimes went on benders and spent the whole night drinking kai-kai and chewing cola nuts. Best to leave them alone next day. I've chewed the cola nut, but you cant get to sleep afterwards. I think thats what Coca Cola was first made from.

Roger Turner
10th February 2011, 01:25
Cannot remember which Chief Steward - maybe Kenny Onions,used to serve "Mexican Pepperpot" apart from White beans and Red pepper can`t remember what else went into it.
Still keep a pot of red pepper and use it regularly.Anybody get caught out on first trip to sea.Curry,Groundnut stew,Palm oil chop - side dishes (small chop) do have some of those little tomatoes ! Red Peppers - little sods those helpful apprentices. they always knew who was sleeping with who and it was also worth going ashore with them they knew all the best places (3rd mates weren`t too bad that way also )

Mike Thurman
13th March 2012, 19:06
Best feeding Chief Steward in Elders (in my opinion) had to be Ken Young followed by Ken Onions. How lucky they were both on Sunjarv while I was there in 1965/66 !

Cheers

Mike Thurman

eldersuk
14th March 2012, 02:30
Best feeding Chief Steward in Elders (in my opinion) had to be Ken Young followed by Ken Onions. How lucky they were both on Sunjarv while I was there in 1965/66 !

Cheers

Mike Thurman


Alas both since crossed the bar. Ken Onions must be 20-25 years ago and Ken Young four or five years ago.
Two "lovable loudmouths" as Freddy Griffiths called them, and great feeders - as I and many others called them.

Derek

Roger Turner
14th March 2012, 22:03
Alas both since crossed the bar. Ken Onions must be 20-25 years ago and Ken Young four or five years ago.
Two "lovable loudmouths" as Freddy Griffiths called them, and great feeders - as I and many others called them.

Now you mention it Freddy Griffiths was right re Ken Onions, also remember he had a habit of hammering on the bulkheads as he wandered down the alleyways - by the way haven`t heard from Freddy Lately.
Roger

eldersuk
15th March 2012, 02:24
I rang Fred a couple of weeks ago, sadly he sounded quite old and feeble.

Derek