Small scenic model. HMS EREBUS, abandoned in the ice.

Shipbuilder
9th March 2008, 10:19
Here is an unusual model that I have just completed. HMS EREBUS of the Franklin Expedition, 1845. HM ships EREBUS & TERROR under the overall command of Sir John Franklin, left England in 1854 in search of the Northwest Passage. Neither ship returned. Fragmentary evidence was found indicating their fate. Graves in the permafrost & some notes left by Captain Crozier (HMS TERROR) stating that the two ships were abandoned on April 25th 1848 after being beset in the ice for over two years. Dragging their boats with them, they tried to make it to land across the ice, but they failed. There were no known survivors. This model shows how HMS EREBUS might have looked several years after being abandoned. It is built to a scale of 20 feet to 1 inch and the hull length is approximately three and a half inches.
http://img181.imageshack.us/img181/246/erebuscomp1mediumqk0.jpg

trawlercook
9th March 2008, 11:11
excellent little model on a very interesting subject,thanks for the wonderful posting.
colin

Shipbuilder
13th March 2008, 19:39
Hi Trawlercook. Thanks for comments. I like to ring the changes with different models each time. I have made the odd trawler as well. Have just been admiring your trawlers this afternoon. Not doing much at present, the Distance Selling Rules (internet) have done for me. Apparently, amongst other things, it is the responsibility of the seller to deliver the model intact and if it gets lost or damaged, the seller must foot the bill for repair or replacment. As if this wasn't bad enough, it is virtually impossible to find a courier that will offer transit liability for scale models & from various reports, those who do will usually try & wriggle out with the statement "inadequate packing!" I can't take the chance as most of my sales over the past few years have been overseas, USA, Hong Kong etc!
I will find it hard to give up ship modelmaking, but I can console myself that as I only build miniatures, it will be a while before I have to stop for lack of space.
Best wishes
Bob

JoyceW
13th March 2008, 21:04
What a beautiful model, Bob, and very evocative. Congratulations.

Am I right in thinking that this was the expedition where recent forensic evidence from the bodies suggests that the men may have died from lead poisoning caused by the cans containing the food? Food in cans was a recent innovation in the mid 19th century and no doubt considered a huge boon for long voyages etc, but at that time it wasn't appreciated that over-exposure to lead was dangerous.

Regards, Joyce

Shipbuilder
13th March 2008, 22:12
Hi Joyce,
Yes, that is the one. The model shows the EREBUS how she may have looked ten years or so after being abandoned in the ice. Evidence suggests that it was lead poisoning from the canned food as well as other factors.
Bob

trawlercook
13th March 2008, 23:14
hi bob
i can understand what your saying as i,ve had damaged models when i,ve sent them as you can see i build to a large scale this is because of my disability.i usually send all over the u.k. by royal mail,when i do this i build a packing case for evrey boat individually as they are all differant sizes then the boat itself is packed in bubble wrap all around it.i leavethe front off as i slide the model into the case.i than take several photographs of the boat in situe i always put a couple in the case and then i screw the front on and i keep the rest on my PC until after the delivery,the boat usually cost around 20 -30 depending on where it has to go it cost around 15-20 to build the case.when some one buys the model i always tell them this is how much it cost but i also say that i can deliver or meet halfway and i leave it up to them then.also i have a private courier i use if its not to far he does this off his book and i just treat him ,but all the cost go to the buyer and if i use royal mail every thing is insured up to 500 in with the price .if i have to send abroad i tell them to make their own arrangements.mostly though the people come to my home and pick them up and more often than not they endup buying more or ordering more.as it stands i,ve built over 400 models to date and i only own one myself so as fast as i build them they are gone so i,ve usually got room.i hope this helps you bob so you can carry on with your fantastic hobby i like you only build boats with history and i like to think when i.m gone i,ve left my mark and in the future people will see what our seamen had to work on.
cheers colin

Shipbuilder
14th March 2008, 07:54
Hi Colin,
Thanks for reply. I have been following the same practice as yourself for some time in that I take photographs of the model during every stage of packing & keep them on my PC. I never thought of including pictures of the packing in with the model though. I never use Royal Mail. I have used UPS for over a year now & they have never broken anything, but on speaking to them about their transit liability they said that photographs of the packing would not be accepted as proof of anything! It is not so bad for UK because transport costs, as you say, are not too high - only about 23 each on my small models, but overseas, it is usually well over 100 & that is where most of them have sold. All these new rules are pretty restrictive with the buyer being protected against every eventuality, but the seller having no protection at all! They are even saying that sellers name & address should be displayed permanently on their websites & I am rather uneasy about this. I checked with Trading Standards & they confirmed it. I am hoping that everything will resolve itself as time goes along. I think that is a good idea of yours to ask them to make their own arrangement for sales abroad. I am working on number 224 since I started counting in October 1992 & fortunately everything has gone smoothly until the announcement of the enforcing of the new rules a few weeks ago.
Click on Miniature Merchant Ships below to see my website.
Best wishes
Bob