British Hussar 1962-?

David Kenwright
18th May 2005, 17:11
I am writing a short profile on British Hussar and would be interested in any anecdotes of members who may have sailed on her; also when the vessel was sold by BP, and when she was sold for demolition.

I only found this website today, so this is my first foray at posting something. I hope someone out there can help.

Many thanks for reading this.

James_C
18th May 2005, 17:20
Welcome to the site David, always a good place to find out information! Good crowd on here too. Heres the info I have on her:

S.T. British Hussar
32341 grt, 18391 nrt, 52546 dwt
Length: 759 feet 8, Breadth: 97 feet 3, Draught: 42 feet 9
Port of Registry: London
Propulsion: 2 Steam turbines dr geared to sc shaft 16000shp 15.5 knots machy aft.
23.01.1962 Launched by John Brown & Co Ltd, Clydebank.
30.05.1962 Completed and handed over to the BP Tanker Company Ltd.
26.12.1975 Arrived at Kaoshiung pending sale for scrap.
05.01.1976 Sold for demolition to local breakers.

One of our members should be able to supply a photo.

julian anstis
18th May 2005, 18:14
Hi David and welcome aboard our site,

As you can see the reply's have started coming in allready and I'm sure someone will point you in the direction of some photo's as well. Hope you enjoy the site and what we have to offer and we look forward to seeing any photo's etc you think our members would be interested in.

Julian

Ron B Manderson
18th May 2005, 19:14
As they you don't have to be mad here
But It sure does help.
And all the help you will ever need
Best Banter on the net.
Ron

John_F
18th May 2005, 19:57
David,
Have you tried BP direct? They supplied me with photos of all the vessels on which I served. Try e-mailing Beverley Meader at BP if she's still there:
meaderb@bp.com
She was very helpful. Make sure you let her know which Hussar you want a picture of as there were at least 2 of them.
Kind regards,
John_F

Fairfield
18th May 2005, 22:33
Look no further than the Tankers Forum for a excellent piece of artwork by our appropriately named member,Tanker!!!!

tanker
19th May 2005, 11:15
Many thanks Paul, i am always happy for your compliments (*))
Gp

David Kenwright
19th May 2005, 12:43
Jim,

Thanks for the information, it's much appreciated.

Best regards,
David

David Kenwright
19th May 2005, 12:47
John,

Thanks for the contact name. I will approach BP. I received some good information from another member also.

Best regards,
David

ruud
16th February 2007, 12:53
Welcome to the site David, always a good place to find out information! Good crowd on here too. Heres the info I have on her:

S.T. British Hussar
32341 grt, 18391 nrt, 52546 dwt
Length: 759 feet 8, Breadth: 97 feet 3, Draught: 42 feet 9
Port of Registry: London
Propulsion: 2 Steam turbines dr geared to sc shaft 16000shp 15.5 knots machy aft.
23.01.1962 Launched by John Brown & Co Ltd, Clydebank.
30.05.1962 Completed and handed over to the BP Tanker Company Ltd.
26.12.1975 Arrived at Kaoshiung pending sale for scrap.
05.01.1976 Sold for demolition to local breakers.

One of our members should be able to supply a photo.
Ahoy James,
Well it should be me to post the wanted HUSSAR,taken on 07-07-1971 on the Rotterdam New Waterway.
Found some unusually shots of BP tankers taken in the early 70's in the "old box":)
Will post more of them in the next coming days,as most of them are rare found.

HENNEGANOL
16th February 2007, 14:13
Ruud,

If your dates are correct, I was C/E on the Hussar when they were taken.

According to my records we were at Rotterdam for repairs from 5th to the 11th July 1971. But as the previous port had been Mersa El Brega I think we must have discharged at Rotterdam and then proceeded for repairs. Unfortunately I cannot remember what repairs were carried out.

After leaving Amsterdam drydock in May, we had experienced problems with the astern guarding valve leaking and boiler tube failure, so it may have been connected with these.

I also notice that I have written C/E £4,116.00 to £5,382.00, min'm after 7 yrs £4,608.00! These are obviously the new rates of pay for that year, can anyone supply a ball park figure for the present rates for comparison.

Regards.

Gerry Taylor

ruud
16th February 2007, 14:23
Ahoy Gerry,
Definitely sure about the date piccie was shot!
So you were on her that time, good to see someones vessel on which he has been at that moment.

John Hunter
19th February 2007, 20:32
Hi,
The British Hussar was my first ship as N/A . Joined her at Angle bay Sept 1967. Spent the next 5.5 months doing the Cape run to the Gulf.............fairly un-eventful really but a happy ship as I remember. Skipper was Captain Temple who had his wife with him. The only event comes to mind was a very sad one. We were about midway between the Canaries and Cape Town when the 4th Engineer who I had joined with took ill and died. He collapsed in the engine room and passed away about 2 hours later. The best diagnosis was a Brain tumour ! The captains wife was a nurse so we had some medical help.About 8 hours After he died and with agreement with the relevant authorities and his wife we buried him at sea. He was sewn into a canvas bag and weighed down with a shackle. The Captain did the service. We stopped and after he went over the side the ship circled the spot blowing the horn. A number of officers threw there caps in the sea as you can imagine a very emotional moment for all. His wife visited us when we came back to the I.O.G.

John Hunter

ruud
19th February 2007, 20:58
Ahoy John,
Indeed an emotional story,which one never forget.

R883301
21st February 2007, 21:30
Ahoy! Henniganol, Aka, Chief Tailor,
Joined 'Hussar' Amsterdam Floating Dry dock 'May 71'
Had great time on her. Though dont remember many of the crew. Cook was a Scot.2nd cook a Sunderlander, Second Engineer had his wife with him, lovley girl, Fell out with 2nd/cook, Her tab'naps were better than his.
Only lowly mess-man myself, First trip B.P, Finally paid off as engineers stwd.in 'Ras el' if memory serves, Discharge book not available but will look up dates when next home, did a few more years With the company ended up as Cat/off before going private, Happy days of polishing wood & cleaning up oil & grease after you dirty Buggers!!!! Yep, Happy days. Art
After thought, Did not the officers stw'd,Name of Jim, (Thin weedy bloke, Bit Efeminate,) Did he not paint a picture for you, Family members if memory serves again, He did for someone Uptop/down aft! Ter'ra

HENNEGANOL
21st February 2007, 22:28
Hi Art,

I always thought it was the 2/Stwd. who looked after me, but I could well be wrong. I do remember the C/Stwd. complaining to me that the bedding from one of the spare J/Es' cabins had been removed and from the noise the 4/E's wife use to make in their cabin next to mine, when he came off watch, I had a good idea who was guilty.

I remember the 2/E's wife, I think her name was Sally and she came from Glasgow. There lies a tale because the 2/E sh*t himself when I walked on board, as I had thrown him off the same ship two years earlier in drydock, when he was 3/E and I was 2/E. As it happens he turned out to be alright.

I can't remember the engineers' steward, he certainly didn't do a painting for me

Thinking back on it I don't think that it was too bad a trip, I was releived after four months and transferred to the British Sailor, and thereby hangs another tale.

Gerry Taylor

R883301
22nd February 2007, 12:15
Happy days, magic ships,

HENNEGANOL
22nd February 2007, 22:20
Without a doubt.

But most important of all we can look back on those days with nostalgia and thank God that we are not at sea now.

BigNick
26th February 2007, 16:11
This must have been an unsuccessful class of ships if she went to scrap at only 14 years old, does anyone know the story?
I sailed on the Dragoon around 1980, she was a one-off straggler, from the name i guess she was from this class? I have a vague recollection that half were built with centre accomodation and the other half all-aft. Dragoon was all-aft.

Cheers,
Nick

John_F
26th February 2007, 19:05
Nick,
All of this class of 8 vessels, with the exception of the Dragoon, were sold for demolition within 15 years of completion. Half of them had centrecastles & the other half were "all aft." The accommodation on the ones with centrecastles was very spacious & comfortable. The Dragoon lasted until 1982, a life of 19 years but only because she had been converted by BP for lightering duties.
The speed of progress in tanker building overtook this class of 50 - 55,000 dwt, built between 1959 & 1963 & they proved uneconomic when tankers of 3 - 4 times that size were being produced with cheaper running costs.
Kind regards,
John F.

GeorgeM13
27th February 2007, 01:56
Size wasn't the problem it was the fact that they were steam ships using too much F.O. per day. It was only after BP got rid of their small/medium crude carriers that they found they had a problem supplying crude to ports that could only handle those sizes of vessel. They were taken to the cleaners by the charter outfits at a time when charter rates were rock bottom. Finally they started building again to meet that market.
I had the pleasure of serving on 3 of the class, British Queen, Guardsman and Grenadier, all good ships in their way.
George

BigNick
1st March 2007, 17:31
Thanks John and George,

Thorough answer to my question about this class, i think i knew about the Dragoon having been converted for lightering but had forgotten. Wasn't a happy ship for me, C/E was Paul Brennand and we didn't get on so it was a doomed trip for me as J/E. I do remember that the D/A was a lovely slow speed Rolls-Royce, a nice change from the screaming Paxmans of the 'River' and 'Itty' boats.
Cheers,
Nick

alastairjs
2nd March 2007, 12:55
GeorgeM13, Snap, I was an apprentice on the Guardsman in 1964 when she was still pretty new and shiny and later senior app. on the Bombardier. They were both comfortable and well appointed ships in my opinion. The Bombardier was particularly pleasent to live on as our accommodation was amidships so you hardly knew the engines were beavering away down aft. Unlike John & Richard I spent the larger part of my apprenticeship on crude carriers.
Regards,
Alastair

johnstonj
10th June 2007, 18:27
I am writing a short profile on British Hussar and would be interested in any anecdotes of members who may have sailed on her; also when the vessel was sold by BP, and when she was sold for demolition.

I only found this website today, so this is my first foray at posting something. I hope someone out there can help.

Many thanks for reading this.

I served on British Hussar in 1970 for 6 months while along side in Trieste there was three fires deliberately set in three cabins in the aft accommadation the tanker was pulled off and then anchored to fight the fires does anyone else know about this incident.

James_C
10th June 2007, 19:58
Not sure if this is related, but I seem to recall a story about a Pyromaniac J/E in the fleet. I think he did something similar, and was eventually found out, I think, in Llandarcy.
Last thing you need on a tanker eh?

HENNEGANOL
10th June 2007, 20:44
If my memory serves me correctly, there was a fleet rumour, that the fire in the saloon of the Br. Queen was due to arson. The arsonist on that occasion had apparently, on a previous occasion, rescued his landlady's daughter from his S. Shields digs, which were on fire and was commended for his actions. Only to be found out at a later date.

It was also a fleet rumour, that the crew from the RN ship which assisted the Queen whilst she was on fire up the Gulf, stole the saloon silver.

As I mentioned in an earlier post, I sailed on the Hussar in 1969/70 and again in 1971 but, I cannot recall having heard about the J/E cabins being set on fire.

So just how much truth may be attached to these rumours after all these years? As I wasn't there, on my part it is all hearsay!

Gerry.

wtaylor
11th June 2007, 12:58
Did time on both the Bombardier and the Dragoon. Hated both and suspect they were jinxed from day one. Dragoon had a series of incidents and the Bombardier had a murder (not during my time officer). I think that the Bombardier was the second ship I was on with Alistair if he did the run to Ulsan via the minefields.
Wilt

twogrumpy
11th June 2007, 20:43
Was on the Hussar 10/71 to 5/72 & 4/73(joined St Vincent CVI, quite novel) to 8/73, couple of pictures taken in the bar in my gallery.
Unable to remember the C/E's names, but seem to remember one was tallish and slim build, with a small beard and glasses, ring any bells?
Medi coasting quite a lot, coming off standby early one morning(full away) it turned out we had just loaded our millionth ton of cargo since drydock, and certain people well led by the C/O decided to have a party, will not go into detail, but was a good one.
There was a rubber dingy on board and some of the braver(foolhardy) would row across Trieste harbour in search of new watering holes.
Was not on board when they had the fire, but the story of the J/E who rescued the kids from a house fire rings a bell.
Did have an O/M who had his wife and son on board, the son could not be left at home as he was a known arsonist,I believe a crew mwmber was designated to keep an eye on him at all times. There were a number of people most unhappy with this situation, and there were moves to make a complaint direct to HQ.
Also did a trip on the Guardsman, both 50's, accomadation wise I consider to be the best I sailed on.
twogrumpy

barnsey
13th June 2007, 07:05
Shift thy butt then Rudd ..... you have been holding out on us ... Tut Tut and you a senior member too

Barnsey ... just going down town to avoid flak...

barnsey
13th June 2007, 07:24
Jim et all ..... the J/E mentioned in the stories was indeed the lad who rescued his landlady or someone from a house on fire .... he was much praised in the media and it was an anti climax afterwards. Then there was the fire on the Queen .... apparantly the same bloke. The fires on the Hussar are something I had not heard about.

I was yanked off the "Gunner" whilst coasting at the Isle of Grain, very much to my annoyance to join the "Hussar" as extra second mate to take her via Lands End to drydock in Birkenhead.

The British crew were quite mutinous for some reason or other and amongst a few "Incidents" they streamed a brand new Polyprop over the "back end" on route ..... stupid idiots ... why in the hell they couldnt have streamed one of the Ginormous, soaking wet, heavy, stiff manilas God alone knows... THICKO's.

barnsey

johnstonj
22nd June 2007, 23:43
I joined the Hussar in July 70 until November 70 Chief engineer was
J W Walsh and the Captain A L Gordon.
The company sent out two detectives from the UK to investigate they interviewed the whole crew and took statements. Turned out to be two lads from the Liverpool crew and the detectives took them back to the UK at the next port. The lads had been suspected of this before and the police had a good idea who was responsible before they even joined the ship.

Johnstonj

Beadle
6th July 2007, 20:41
Hi. David
The Hussar was my one and only ship in my brief career as Junior Engineer. I stood by when she was being built in Clydebank, sailed on her sea trials and then on to Falmouth were she had her cradle removed. We sailed to Banias (Syria) twice and Tripoli (Lebanon) once before I was invalided off with a perforated ulcer at Malta. To any of my shipmates who may read this, yes I did survive in spite of the chief steward loading me up with salt tablets. I attach a pic of the Hussar taken from the BP magazine.

red devil
13th November 2008, 13:19
I sailed on the Hussar for six months as first trip N/A from March to September 1969. I joined her in Cammel Laird's yard in Birkenhead, it was the biggest ship I had ever seen!!
Did you know that British Ropes chose the Hussar as a floating experiment to check the long term effects of weather exposure on their ropes? A wooden frame on the monkey island was hung with dozens of different types in an experiment that was due to last for 5 years.
It was on this ship were I learned all about chipping, scraping, painting,tank diving and cement washing F.W. tanks!!
On our way to the gulf we made the usual stop at Capetown, but whilst manouvering one of the astern turbines was damaged. The ship was ordered to Durban where we stayed in the docks for a week to repair several rows of turbine blades which had been stripped off.We were so close to the city and the beach - fantastic!!
I paid off at the IOG where it took longer to get home than if I had left in the gulf!!

twogrumpy
13th November 2008, 20:15
I did two trips on the Hussar, 2/4/73 to 26/8/73 & 25/10/71 to 9/5/72.
Nice ship, still have a soft spot for the 50's, seem to recall a lot of Medi coasting, Trieste quite often.
There was a great p*** up one morning after stand by, well led by the mate, think it was to celebrate the the number of cargoes loaded since drydock.
As said thank god we are not at sea now, glad I did a runner in 86.

the pig
4th February 2010, 21:26
i think it was the hussar drydock in malta fire in the engine room every body running here and there with hoses and breathing gear suddenly twigged no water laughed myself silly regards the pig

theold49'er
9th February 2010, 21:35
Ah lovely memories of the Hussar sailed on her twice, as fourth engineer and then third. My favourite ship in my BP Career. Also sailed on the Grenadier 1st trip cadet back in 1968 and on the Dragoon when she was a lightering vessel.

Dave P.

derekhore
10th February 2010, 10:56
....... and on the Dragoon when she was a lightering vessel.

Dave P.


Perchance did you know Dave Cummins .. mate on the dragoon ..'Drag 1' I think he was!

Sailed with him as a Deck Cadet with BP a couple of times ... then as mate with him when with Rowbothams, he was Skipper on my last trip with them.

chrishandel
18th February 2010, 00:03
British Grenadier was my 1st ship in 1972. John Riach Scott was the Captain. BP were fitting the Bush reel to reel VCR and TV's on ships at the time and we found a huge collection of Port Said porn when removing the decjhead to lay the TV cables

Mariner44
5th February 2012, 21:10
Hi. David
The Hussar was my one and only ship in my brief career as Junior Engineer. I stood by when she was being built in Clydebank, sailed on her sea trials and then on to Falmouth were she had her cradle removed. We sailed to Banias (Syria) twice and Tripoli (Lebanon) once before I was invalided off with a perforated ulcer at Malta. To any of my shipmates who may read this, yes I did survive in spite of the chief steward loading me up with salt tablets. I attach a pic of the Hussar taken from the BP magazine.

I joined the Hussar at IOG in June 62 as a first trip deck apprentice. I vividly remember a foremast fire on my first morning cargo watch. I had not been to sea school and had no training whatsoever, so helped fight the fire (ineffectually) as other folks disembarked rapidly. The IOG fire team were conspicuous by their absence, and it was two fire tugs from Sheerness who eventually extinguished the flames.

I also remember your disembarkation in Malta. Even though we were in the approaches to Valetta harbour, it wasn't very calm so I guess you'd have had a bit of a rough ride to hospital!

sparks69
11th February 2012, 22:05
I painted my deckhead sky blue for a bit of a change. The o/m (N D C Michaels) took one look and said it was not company colours so I had to repaint it back to mouldy magnolia. He never noticed the Radio Room though. Smashing ship though. The only one I was never sea sick on in 19 years at sea. Spent most of the 6 months on board sailing from Adriatic ports in Italy to Banias or Tripoli.

david freeman
18th February 2012, 12:45
The Rudolf V/v. sailed as a J/E in the period you are looking for. Great crowd of engineers. maybe 64/65. We had a 4 engineer Rudolf Henerson who insisted that an accommodation steam drain return was in the clossed position: Every time on watch this vavle had to be checked (Regardless of reason) and it became know to us enginneers at that time as the Rudolph V/V and as such entered into the dirty log. Rudolph I had previosly sailed with on the Queen.

michael mcaree
26th August 2013, 21:17
I am writing a short profile on British Hussar and would be interested in any anecdotes of members who may have sailed on her; also when the vessel was sold by BP, and when she was sold for demolition.(Whaaa)

I only found this website today, so this is my first foray at posting something. I hope someone out there can help.

Many thanks for reading this.

Hi David, would prefer to know if you are still around after all this time. I done my first trip to sea on the hussar on her maiden voyage, mike

DAVELECKIE
26th August 2013, 22:48
Hi David, would prefer to know if you are still around after all this time. I done my first trip to sea on the hussar on her maiden voyage, mike

David Kenwright is now MD of Achater offshore Ltd in Aberdeen.

Graham Wallace
27th August 2013, 06:11
Hi,
The British Hussar was my first ship as N/A . Joined her at Angle bay Sept 1967. Spent the next 5.5 months doing the Cape run to the Gulf.............fairly un-eventful really but a happy ship as I remember. Skipper was Captain Temple who had his wife with him. The only event comes to mind was a very sad one. We were about midway between the Canaries and Cape Town when the 4th Engineer who I had joined with took ill and died. He collapsed in the engine room and passed away about 2 hours later. The best diagnosis was a Brain tumour ! The captains wife was a nurse so we had some medical help.About 8 hours After he died and with agreement with the relevant authorities and his wife we buried him at sea. He was sewn into a canvas bag and weighed down with a shackle. The Captain did the service. We stopped and after he went over the side the ship circled the spot blowing the horn. A number of officers threw there caps in the sea as you can imagine a very emotional moment for all. His wife visited us when we came back to the I.O.G.

John Hunter

The unfortunate 4E was Malcolm Coates a 1961 BP Engineering Apprentice. In late 2008 I came across someone who was one of the other watchkeeping engineers.
Quote,
He was 12 to 4 watch at 0200 approx when he collapsed on bottom plates by stbd l/o pump into a coma. His junior called me. We got Malcom to the "hospital midships" where the captain's wife (apparatly a nurse) declared he had died at about 06.00. We buried him at sea the same afternoon!
Unquote,

Wow! a couple of days off Capetown.

The 2 senior watchkeeping engineers had a pretty rough time from there on working 6 on /6 off to the Gulf and back to Wilemshaven. 2E did not work a watch and neither CE. Malcolm's replacement was a Motor CE doing steam time... I would have thought BP should/would have done better than that. This was after the Crown incident ......things were different back then!

I think a 'happy ship' is an an unusual statement, certainly not for the black gang!

Graham

I find it unfortunate that I know no more about Malcolm Coates from College years through to this sad incident.

rjer
8th July 2014, 21:44
Hi,
I saw the British Hussar ship's bell today and thought the name was unusual so looked it up and found this discussion.

It is lot 7 in the auction on Thursday 10th July http://www.rdauctions.co.uk/

sparks69
9th July 2014, 20:34
Amazing - I'm tempted to put a bid in but where would I put it.................? At our time of life we are downsizing rather than collecting even more stuff !

lewmart
18th August 2014, 16:09
Hi,
The British Hussar was my first ship as N/A . Joined her at Angle bay Sept 1967. Spent the next 5.5 months doing the Cape run to the Gulf.............fairly un-eventful really but a happy ship as I remember. Skipper was Captain Temple who had his wife with him. The only event comes to mind was a very sad one. We were about midway between the Canaries and Cape Town when the 4th Engineer who I had joined with took ill and died. He collapsed in the engine room and passed away about 2 hours later. The best diagnosis was a Brain tumour ! The captains wife was a nurse so we had some medical help.About 8 hours After he died and with agreement with the relevant authorities and his wife we buried him at sea. He was sewn into a canvas bag and weighed down with a shackle. The Captain did the service. We stopped and after he went over the side the ship circled the spot blowing the horn. A number of officers threw there caps in the sea as you can imagine a very emotional moment for all. His wife visited us when we came back to the I.O.G.

John Hunter

I was one of the two engineers that worked 6 on 6off after the death of Malcom who I knew from South Shields college in 1963. I left B.P. after this trip as I was not happy with the way things were going. I am most interested in any information from other engineers who were on the Hussar at this time. Martin Lewis (known as Lew)

lewmart
18th August 2014, 16:14
I am writing a short profile on British Hussar and would be interested in any anecdotes of members who may have sailed on her; also when the vessel was sold by BP, and when she was sold for demolition.

I only found this website today, so this is my first foray at posting something. I hope someone out there can help.

Many thanks for reading this.

I was sailing as 4th engineer on the Hussar in 1967 during which time the other 4th engineer Malcom Coates died whilst on watch.I am interested to know the other engineers names at the time, I seem to remember Whiehouse was the 2nd engineer. Martin Lewis (known as Lew)

twogrumpy
18th August 2014, 16:36
There you are, bar of the Hussar.(Pint)

lewmart
18th August 2014, 16:46
The unfortunate 4E was Malcolm Coates a 1961 BP Engineering Apprentice. In late 2008 I came across someone who was one of the other watchkeeping engineers.
Quote,
He was 12 to 4 watch at 0200 approx when he collapsed on bottom plates by stbd l/o pump into a coma. His junior called me. We got Malcom to the "hospital midships" where the captain's wife (apparatly a nurse) declared he had died at about 06.00. We buried him at sea the same afternoon!
Unquote,

Wow! a couple of days off Capetown.

The 2 senior watchkeeping engineers had a pretty rough time from there on working 6 on /6 off to the Gulf and back to Wilemshaven. 2E did not work a watch and neither CE. Malcolm's replacement was a Motor CE doing steam time... I would have thought BP should/would have done better than that. This was after the Crown incident ......things were different back then!

I think a 'happy ship' is an an unusual statement, certainly not for the black gang!

Graham

I find it unfortunate that I know no more about Malcolm Coates from College years through to this sad incident.
I was one of the two engineers who did 6 on 6 off for the rest of that trip. Tough going. Martin Lewis (Lew)

lewmart
18th August 2014, 16:52
I was an engineer on the Hussar when the other 4th engineer, Malcom Coates died and worked 6on 6 off back to Whilemshaven in 1967. I would like to see any information there is available. Martin Lewis (Lew)

Graham Wallace
18th August 2014, 17:42
I was one of the two engineers who did 6 on 6 off for the rest of that trip. Tough going. Martin Lewis (Lew)

Martin,

Long time since we were in touch (2008), How is Ralph Jenkins, still around? You were my contact that gave me the above info in 2008 about Malcolm.

I'll send you a shipsnostalgia email.

Graham