Osaka Bay

Fairfield
20th May 2005, 13:17
One of what was termed the G2-Second Generation-container ships of about 50000grt built in the 1970s.
She and her sisters were all built in Hamburg for Overseas Containers and I can remember seeing CARDIGAN BAY and another one of them under construction.Now dwarfed by the new breed of giant containerships.
This was taken in Southampton in 1978.

Doug Rogers
21st May 2005, 04:54
Good picture Paul, not a bad looking vessel as container ships go!!.
Doug

Fairfield
22nd May 2005, 19:54
Yes,they looked good as did quite a lot of similar ships built then.Can/t say the same for these biggies of today!

Bob S
22nd May 2005, 20:25
Followed her down Southampton Water on one of the old Red Funnel ferries with camera in hand, never did catch up with her.

Rhiw.com
23rd May 2005, 00:43
:rolleyes: Good picture Paul, not a bad looking vessel as container ships go!!.
Doug
They all look good from the back of a taxi!!!!!

Doug Rogers
23rd May 2005, 01:16
Followed her down Southampton Water on one of the old Red Funnel ferries with camera in hand, never did catch up with her.

Yes they did move along a little whereas the old Red Funnel puffers probably managed a bit over twelve knots or so..but perhaps they are a bit faster now..long time since I travelled on the ferry by that route..happy days tho!!.

Doug Rogers
23rd May 2005, 01:18
:rolleyes:
They all look good from the back of a taxi!!!!!

Good comment!! (H) (H)

janbonde
12th November 2005, 21:14
The first OCL were 28800 t a couple of friends of mine were in them Encounter,Botany,Flinders,Moreton,Jarvis Bay,one other I cannot remember

Frank P
12th November 2005, 23:51
My brother worked on the Osaka Bay, Liverpool Bay, Cardigan bay and Tokyo Bay for many years, first for Blue funnel/OCL and then P+O.
Frank

jimmaclean
13th November 2005, 21:44
I sailed on the Cardigan, Osaka & Liverpool. All were originally steamers but were re-engined with 2 off 8RND90M sulzers. Good accommodation, excellent bars & built with teak decks aft of the accom block in the swimming pool area. Newer far easters were not as people friendly and lacked the character.

Any Port in a Storm
3rd March 2006, 10:49
janblonde - the other was the Discovery Bay.
I had the 'pleasure' of sailing on the Flinders, Cardigan and Tokyo a good few years ago.
Apparently, before the Liverpool Bay class were re-engined (around 1980, although they kept the same shafting) they could do over 30kts. They were built like brick sh*t houses which is why they were able to run almost flat out right up until they were scrapped, although as duty engineer you spent a good portion of your night down below...

ruud
17th February 2007, 09:11
Ahoy,
Just found these in the old box:

Twerp
20th October 2014, 23:58
I sailed on Osaka Bay in the 70s

Twerp
21st October 2014, 00:00
Sailed on 4 of the Liverpool Bay class in the 70s. Liverpool Bay, Kowloon Bay, Osaka Bay and Tokyo Bay.

makko
21st October 2014, 19:57
What department, Twerp? They were all Ocean Fleets vessels.
Rgds.
Dave

Twerp
21st October 2014, 20:16
Engine room. I done my steam time on them. Last one I was on was in dry dock Hamburg 1979.

Twerp
21st October 2014, 20:26
Yes I sailed on them all except Cardigan Bay. Tokyo, Kowloon, Liverpool and Osaka Bay. I was withe Ocean from 1962 to 1987.

makko
22nd October 2014, 16:12
Twerp,

Did you know Dave Hooper, 2/E from Manchester? I sailed with him on Barber Blue Sea when he was getting motor time in for a return to the Bays after re-engining.

I heard that they were a complete nightmare following the conversion, the principal problem being that the engines were mounted at an angle to couple to the existing shafts. I remember one trip on the Barber Priam when we were arrested in New Orleans after a Bay boat had clipped a bulker when accelerating up (people told me it was akin to a power boat!) after exiting the Suez Canal.

Rgds.
Dave

Twerp
24th October 2014, 01:02
I did know Dave Hooper. But not heard of him for a long time. He lived in Flixton.

Twerp
24th October 2014, 01:06
Correction Davyhulme

James_C
24th October 2014, 01:21
Twerp,

Did you know Dave Hooper, 2/E from Manchester? I sailed with him on Barber Blue Sea when he was getting motor time in for a return to the Bays after re-engining.

I heard that they were a complete nightmare following the conversion, the principal problem being that the engines were mounted at an angle to couple to the existing shafts. I remember one trip on the Barber Priam when we were arrested in New Orleans after a Bay boat had clipped a bulker when accelerating up (people told me it was akin to a power boat!) after exiting the Suez Canal.

Rgds.
Dave

Dave,
You are correct in that the converted Bays had that problem with inclined engines. BP had a similar issue when they converted BRITISH RESOURCE from steam turbine to slow speed diesel in the late 80s. Their solution was to leave the stern tube/shaft arrangement intact on cost grounds, but build the slow speed diesel on stilts on the level (so to speak) with a coupling between the two. They also left all the auxiliaries steam powered, so she retained her two large boilers.
Not exactly ideal as you might imagine and she was known as something of a work up for the engineers. I'm sure Satanic Mechanic can elaborate further - I'm but a mere deckie!

makko
24th October 2014, 15:04
Dave,
You are correct in that the converted Bays had that problem with inclined engines.

Thanks, Jim. Some of the guys that I talked to were literally on the verge of a nervous breakdown! The biggest problem were scavenge fires as the oil would not drain and would pool in the scavenge manifold. Added to that was the reutilization of various odd bits of pipe to cut costs with attendant dissimilar metal corrosion leading to leaks everywhere. I have it on good authority that a lot of the old steam queens were brought to tears!
Rgds.
Dave