Aquitania

Ian
6th April 2004, 15:35
Known as "The Ship Beautiful" the AQUITANIA, Below, was built in 1914 for the Liverpool/New York service of the Cunard S/S Co. After only three round voyages she was requisitioned by the government for use as an armed merchant cruiser but it was decided that the employment of costly liners in this capacity was not practical. She was then converted for use as a troopship then as a hospital ship and again in 1916 as a troopship. Reconditioned and converted from coal to oil firing she resumed trans-Atlantic service in 1920 quickly becoming one of the most popular ships on the Atlantic. In 1939 she was again requisitioned as a troopship, a role she played until being released from government service in 1948. She was sold for demolition in 1950 arriving at Faslane in February and promptly broken up by Bisco Ltd.
AQUITANIA was the last of the four funnelled liners and the only major liner to service in both world wars.

BeyondCruises
19th February 2006, 01:59
Very nice photo.

Daniel

vix
19th February 2006, 03:14
Very nice photo.

Daniel
Yes, a time when ships looked like ships...not floating piers. Vix (Night)

fred henderson
19th February 2006, 13:46
Aquitania was a rare bird for the Transatlantic service. She was built without a Government subsidy, although she did have a share of the Mail income. To make her an economic proposition she needed to have 50% greater carrying capacity than her running mates, Lusitania and Mauritania. She was also significantly slower, with a design speed of 23 knots. She was a great ship for her time, but thankfully those times are long past.
She was 45,647 gross tons, which was almost as big as Titanic. As most members will know, gross registered tonnage (grt) is a measurement of the volume of watertight space within the ship, with 100 cubic feet being equal to 1 grt. I think net tonnage is a more meaningful measurement. This is grt minus all of the space taken up by machinery, bunkers, crew accommodation and stores. In other words the space available for passengers and cargo (the old liners carried mail and express cargo). Aquitania's net tonnage was 21,998.
The early 20th Century Cunarders really packed them in. Aquitania carried 597 First, 614 Second and 2,052 Third Class passengers plus 972 crew. A total of 3,263 passengers. That is 6.74 tons per passenger and 3.36 passengers per crew member. It should be remembered that a considerable number of the crew would be stokers - she burned 680 tons of hand fired coal per day.
Queen Mary 2, is probably the first unsubsidised Premier Division, Transatlantic liner to have been built since Aquitania. For comparison QM2 is 148,258 grt, 98,720 net, 26.5 knots burning 216 tons of oil per day and with a crew of 1,238. Her lower berth capacity is 2,620 passengers and her maximum capacity is 3,090 passengers. Taking the maximum capacity figure, that is 31.95 tons per passenger and 2.5 passengers per crew member.
In my view, most passengers travelled in Aquitania because the competing ships were just as bad and it was "the only way to cross". The majority would never step on board a ship again.
People travel in modern passenger ships for pleasure and return again and again. Of course the ships look different from those that packed in passengers and crew like sardines. If the passenger shipping industry had not moved on, it would not be thriving today.

Fred (Thumb)

James_C
19th February 2006, 14:26
Fred,
But just imadine the ship beautiful was still with us, and modernised in a similar way to QE2, major improvements to engines, better, ensuite cabins etc.
It would be interesting to see what was most popular, as after all, in modern parlance, QE2 is primeval compared to QM2, yet still holds her own (and more) financially.
Interestingly, I thought I'd do a little 'survey' the other day.
We had a lot of friends rounds for a party last week, as well as the normal people coming and going, and I showed them a picture of QM (the real one) and her successor and asked them to pick out which one looked like a ship.
All 28 people who passed through my doors in the past week picked the grand old lady. Seeing the people 'surveyed' ranged in years from 17-62, none of whom coming from a nautical background, I thought that was quite indicative of peoples perceptions, even today.
Other members should try it, you might be surprised!

fred henderson
19th February 2006, 17:04
James.
I agree that some of the old timers looked great, just as some were real ugly ducklings. My point is that the only way Cunard could build Aquitania with their own money was by building her slower and 50% bigger than her subsidised running mates then stuffing her with people in awful conditions. They could get away with that because the other liners at the time were just as bad and the poor souls were forced to use them to cross the Atlantic.
The British Government financed a large chunk of QM, QE and QE2. If they had not, then the ships would never have been built. The German, French, Italian and US Transatlantic Liners were all built on government money. In these circumstances it may be possible to take a less rigid financial view. Even then there were huge protests about the appearance of QE2 when she was built.
Carnival is brilliant at providing the ships today's passengers want. When Cunard built Aquitania the passengers did not have the alternative of air travel. Show your sample population interior shots of cabins of the same grade from QM and QM2 and ask them to make a choice. Tell them that they can have the same QM2 cabin standard in a refurbished QM at 50% higher fares and ask them to make a choice. Then tell them that QM cannot comply with the latest safety standards.
Aquitania was a good looking ship of her time. I think British Admiral of 1917 was also a classic, but there is no way that anyone would try to operate her today, or to bring her up to today's requirements. Both were ships of their time. The ships of today need to meet today's requirment, which is why they do not look like the classics, or a pop song sounds like Mozart.

Fred

James_C
19th February 2006, 17:20
But Fred, there is absoltely no reason why ships of today cannot have sheer, tumblehomes, raked masts, funnels etc. Its all down to cost.
Just because the externals show some fine old fashioned flair does in no way mean the internals have to be like broom cupboards.
There are a few innovative naval architects out there who like their ships to look good (as far as that is possible) than them being purely practical. Sadly, they aren't always allowed creative choice.
In my opinion, QM2 is nothing more than a bastardised QE2. Merely taller, longer and uglier (complete lack of sheer and tumblehome). They should have gone on in the same vein as the progression from the likes of Aquitania to QM, QM to the likes of Transvaal Castle, TC to QE2 etc. They all retained the classic lines, but moved with the times.
If that had been done, the ship may generate more respect and admiration from the purists, instead of mongrel she is, being a compromise between a bigger QE2 and the overgrown shopping trolley that is the likes of Diamond Princess.
Just my tuppence worth...

(Night)

fred henderson
19th February 2006, 23:03
You know Jim we shipbuilders are a conservative lot. If something seems to work, why think of changing it. So when we moved from wood to iron, then steel, we continued to build our ships in exactly the same way, with sheer, camber, tumblehome and the raked masts used in sailing ships. We even continued to use clipper stems, bowsprits and counter sterns, until it dawned on us that they had no part to play in a steamship once steam engines became sufficiently reliable to dispense with sails. It took us even longer to realise that a steel ship is far more a girder than an arch.
So the question really is, why should a modern ship have sheer, camber and tumblehome, all of which are very expensive to create, but serve no structural purpose? They were retained in passenger ships for aesthetic reasons far longer than in other types of ships. Yet they cause far more difficulties in passenger ships than in almost any other type of vessel. Every piece of fitted furniture needed to be individually made for the precise position it occupied in the ship. It was a production nightmare created for no technical reason whatsoever. This is clearly shown in the construction time of the Queens: -

Queen Mary – 81,253 grt – Build time from contract to delivery 44 months (excluding period construction suspended)
Queen Elizabeth 2 – 65,863 grt – Build time 52 months, 4 months late.
Queen Mary 2 – 148,258 grt – Build time 37 months.

I am sorry, but I think modern passenger ships are splendid shipbuilding achievements and sad that some people dismiss them out of hand because they do not look like Cutty Sark. I would also point out that these are commercial vessels, so of course cost is a major factor, but the owners are very willing to pay for the “wow factor” that is appreciated by their customers. They are not convinced that the enthusiast’s nostalgia is cost effective.

So we beg to differ

Regards
Fred

dom
20th February 2006, 06:27
bigger,bigger,bigger,but are they better,better,better,soon they'll be that big that wont need to leave the wharfe, and who wants to cruise with 5,000 pass,

fred henderson
20th February 2006, 10:25
bigger,bigger,bigger,but are they better,better,better,soon they'll be that big that wont need to leave the wharfe, and who wants to cruise with 5,000 pass,

They will always need to leave the wharfe Dom, so the owners can load the next one with the crowds waiting to board.

Fred (Thumb)

rstimaru
20th February 2006, 15:04
if you are ever on the isle of wight and can get over to shanklin you will find the smoke room in the park hotel, the reception area is made from its panels plus not only the Aquitania but a whole lot of old shipping photos

rstimaru
21st February 2006, 13:39
Sorry shipmates i said the park hotel it is in fact the parkbury in sandown maybe pompyfan could verify this

Fairfield
21st February 2006, 14:00
It was actually on this day in 1950 that she arrived for breaking.

Frank Holleran
21st February 2006, 19:10
In New Zealand..a lot of the Maori returned servicemen, of the Maori Battalion.. named their children after different places and events during the war, overseas.... My father-in-laws elders' named my wife after the troop ship which took them to the war..Her full name is Aquitania Aramina Hinehou..of course everone calls her Tania.
Regards
Frank.

PS: Aramina in Maori (means Alamein) one of her fathers cousins was killed in the battle.

rstimaru
23rd February 2006, 19:50
It was my proud and privilege to have known a stewadess from the aquitania she was on the QM and on the Carmania she was only known as auntie her first name was Margret and she looked after all the new people that came on board not as her job but because she was like that

Baltic Wal
23rd February 2006, 19:52
My firsy ship, sailed to Halifax on her in 1948. Still have the card with log extract on back.

Longships
27th December 2006, 08:41
I was in a Royal Navy draft that took passage in her in 1945 - Southampton to Sydney. As a troopship they really packed the passengers into her, as they did on all troopships of course.

KIWI
1st January 2007, 03:05
The tune Blue Smoke written by Ruru Karitiana relates to his voyage on Aquitania to Egypt in the early days of WW2.Blue smoke was of course from funnels.Kiwi

cathyb
3rd January 2007, 14:53
Does anyone know of any other places (other than Sydney and New Zealand) that the Aquitania actually visited during her time in the Southern Hemishere? I'm trying to track down where my husband's Great uncle may have jumped ship!!

Lksimcoe
3rd January 2007, 21:31
I beleive that after the war she also made a stop in Hong Kong when on one of her war bride voyages. I also remember reading about a stop in Singapore on that same trip, but cannot find the link. Chances are on one of the trips to Australia and New Zealand, she visited other Commonwealth sites as well.

But she made a lot of post war trips to Canada as well delivering war brides, so who knows, maybe your uncle is a Canuk. (My mom came to Canada on the Aquitania in 1944)

:)

Keith Adams
4th January 2007, 02:08
The "Aquitania" had a beautiful counter stern with old fashioned scroll work,
gilded and all... better than "Cutty Sark". She really was a good looker when
fully loaded... used to pass right by her on the Wallasey ferry boat. Snowy.

Stephen J. Card
4th January 2007, 06:46
The "Aquitania" had a beautiful counter stern with old fashioned scroll work,
gilded and all... better than "Cutty Sark". She really was a good looker when
fully loaded... used to pass right by her on the Wallasey ferry boat. Snowy.



Snowy,

Just read your profile.

PSNC cadet to Deck Hand on a clapped out old Liberty ship. What was the cause of your downfall? Women or grog?

I've only had one opportunity to visit the O'Brian.... several years ago. I think I felt more excitement visiting her than I did visiting the Queen Mary in Long Beach!

The Liberty that interests me most is Leicester from Federal Steam N. Co. She went ashore in Bermuda during a hurricane in 1948. The story is told in Farley's Mowat's excellent book 'The Serpent's Coil'.

I wish I'd had a shot at sailing in a Liberty, but by the time I went to sea they were all but finished. I even missed out on the SD14's.

Hope you enjoy a few more trips around the Bay this year.

Stephen

Keith Adams
5th January 2007, 04:35
Hi Stephen, Mostly women! Anyway... spent alot of time gaining USCG Certification ... had to start all over, although they did end up giving me credit for served sea-time. The Survival and Firefighting courses were really intense and of great value to me,but the seamanship stuff was a waste of time as is aimed at beginners, taught by ex Navy, examined by Coast Guard and very little to do with what a Deckie really does.There is THE NAVY WAY, THE MERCHANT NAVY WAY and THE COAST GUARD WAY...one has to answer questions the USCG WAY to pass!... enough said. Great being a seaman on a ship with a real steering wheel, steam winches and derricks (booms). Snowy

Stephen J. Card
5th January 2007, 05:44
Hi Stephen, Mostly women! Anyway... spent alot of time gaining USCG Certification ... had to start all over, although they did end up giving me credit for served sea-time. The Survival and Firefighting courses were really intense and of great value to me,but the seamanship stuff was a waste of time as is aimed at beginners, taught by ex Navy, examined by Coast Guard and very little to do with what a Deckie really does.There is THE NAVY WAY, THE MERCHANT NAVY WAY and THE COAST GUARD WAY...one has to answer questions the USCG WAY to pass!... enough said. Great being a seaman on a ship with a real steering wheel, steam winches and derricks (booms). Snowy



A good friend of mine from Baltimore is a very keen supported and sometimes 'crewmember' on the John W. Brown. Ben is Kings Pint trained cadet now USCH Certified Master, sailing as First officer on board Cunard's new Queen Mary 2. First American national to serve as a deck officer with Cunard!

I have two books on the Liberty ships. I'm sure you have see them also... Ian Stewart's LIBERTY SHIPS IN PEACETIME and LE LIBERTY SHIPS by Jean-Yves Brouard. Both are excellent volumes.

It is amazing how simple Liberty ships are... especially the engine rooms.

I am originally from Bermuda. The PSNC ships were a familiar sight of course. I was just six when the whole family went out in grandfather's boat to see the Reina Del Pacifico aground on the reefs. Funny, I don't remember seeing Reina Del Mar at all. What ships did you sail in?

Stephen

Keith Adams
6th January 2007, 05:26
Hello again, glad I checked my site again... I posted a "Reina del Pacifico" pic
in the gallery yesterday. As for ships, they were,in order:- mv"Losada"
mv"Salaverry" mv"Santander" ss"Cuzco" mv"Salamanca" mv"Salaverry"
mv"Walsingham" and back on the mv"Salaverry" Left PSNC May 7 1956.
As for the books... I have not read either but will look them up, thanks!
We had a Cadet on the "Santander" from Bermuda... can`t recall his name...
Oh, we take the "J.O.B." out to meet the "QM 2" when she arrives San Francisco afternoon of Feb 4th... big welcome! Snowy

dom
6th January 2007, 05:34
steam winches, derricks,topping lifts, stoppers,hatch boards and tarps,man for the wheel LUXUARY

Allan Wareing
10th January 2007, 11:36
I was in a Royal Navy draft that took passage in her in 1945 - Southampton to Sydney. As a troopship they really packed the passengers into her, as they did on all troopships of course.

Hi Longships, I made the return passage Sydney-Southampton as a DBS in her in 1955. I'll try to upload a pic taken at that time in Sydney.
Not a clue where I got it from.
Regards, Allan wareing

Lksimcoe
10th January 2007, 15:45
Allan

Couldn't have been the Aquitania in 1955. She was scrapped in 1950.

Baltic Wal
10th January 2007, 17:07
Allan

Couldn't have been the Aquitania in 1955. She was scrapped in 1950.


You beat me to it, she arrived at Faslane on 21st February 1950, after sailing over 3 million miles during 2 wars and peacetime. All was gone by the end of the year. My voyage in her in 1948 certainly influenced my life.

Baltic Wal
10th January 2007, 17:13
Does anyone know of any other places (other than Sydney and New Zealand) that the Aquitania actually visited during her time in the Southern Hemishere? I'm trying to track down where my husband's Great uncle may have jumped ship!!

Cathy,

Some years ago Arnold Hague gave me the full list of voyages of the Aquitania. I will try and dig it out and PM it to you.

Ian

Lksimcoe
10th January 2007, 17:54
My mother came to Canada on her in 1944. Her and 31 other women on her, and 3,500 Canadian troops coming home. They were under armed guards the whole time. All I remember her saying about the ship that even in wartime, she was beautiful.

In 1953 she and my 2 sisters went to England on a CP ship. Somewhere is the black hole called my storage room are pictures of them on the ship. Don't know which one, but if I can ever find them, I'll post them.

Mark Chirnside
3rd February 2007, 20:18
Cathy,

Some years ago Arnold Hague gave me the full list of voyages of the Aquitania. I will try and dig it out and PM it to you.

Ian

Did you find the list, Ian? I ask because I have a list from the Cunard archive typed-up on my computer. I'd be very happy to share it if anyone wanted to contact me.

Best wishes,

Mark.

Allan Wareing
5th February 2007, 11:33
Allan

Couldn't have been the Aquitania in 1955. She was scrapped in 1950.

Oops! sorry, that should have been 1945. Also sailed in her again after returning the Cunard managed ss Empire Battleaxe ( I was an AB in her ) to Norfolk, Virginia in 1947. Cunard put us all on a train to Halifax, Nova Scotia where we joined Aquitania for passage to Southampton. She still only had troopship accomodation.
Allan

Mark Chirnside
5th February 2007, 13:10
Thanks for sharing your memories, Allan. It is wonderful to know that so many who sailed on Aquitania are still around, as she had such a long life.

Did you make many voyages?

Best wishes,

Mark.

Baltic Wal
5th February 2007, 14:47
Did you find the list, Ian? I ask because I have a list from the Cunard archive typed-up on my computer. I'd be very happy to share it if anyone wanted to contact me.

Best wishes,

Mark.

Mark, have just found the list but not typed onto my PC, covers the period 1939 to 1945. Would therefore be quicker for you to respond.

Thanks, Ian

Mark Chirnside
5th February 2007, 15:05
Here we go, Ian:

Voyage Number Date Itinerary
329 November 29th 1939 – December 21st 1939 Southampton, Halifax, Gourock, Southampton.
330 January 16th 1940 – February 13th 1940 Southampton, Halifax, Gourock, Southampton.
331 March 9th 1940 – April 20th 1940 Southampton, Freetown, Capetown, Fremantle, Sydney, Wellington.
332 May 2nd 1940 – June 22nd 1940 Wellington, Fremantle, Capetown, Simonstown, Freetown, Greenock, Liverpool.
333 June 29th 1940 – July 29th 1940 Liverpool, Freetown, Capetown, Simonstown, Colombo.
334 August 3rd 1940 – September 15th 1940 Colombo, Fremantle, Sydney, Fremantle, Bombay.
335 September 22nd 1940 – November 4th 1940 Bombay, Fremantle, Sydney, Fremantle, Bombay.
336 November 8th 1940 – January 29th 1941 Bombay, Fremantle, Sydney, Fremantle, Colombo, Fremantle, Sydney.
337 February 8th 1941 – March 17th 1941 Sydney, Fremantle, Bombay, Singapore (dry-dock).
338 April 26th 1941 – June 15th 1941 Singapore, Colombo, Suez, Trincomalee, Fremantle, Sydney.
339 June 22nd 1941 – August 23rd 1941 Sydney, Wellington, Fremantle, Trincomalee, Port Tewfik, Colombo, Fremantle, Sydney.
340 September 5th 1941 – November 28th 1941 Sydney, Wellington, Fremantle, Colombo, Port Tewfik, Bombay, Colombo, Singapore, Sydney.
341 December 28th 1941 – January 8th 1942 Sydney, Port Moresby, Sydney.
342 January 10th 1942 – January 31st 1942 Sydney, Fremantle, Ratui Bay, Fremantle, Sydney.
343 February 10th 1942 – March 1st 1942 Sydney, Honolulu, San Francisco.
344 March 10th 1942 – March 24th 1942 San Francisco, Honolulu, San Francisco.
345 March 30th 1942 – April 23rd 1942 San Francisco, Honolulu, San Pedro, Panama, New York.
346 April 30th 1942 – May 12th 1942 New York, Clyde.
347 May 31st 1942 – August 14th 1942 Clyde, Freetown, Simonstown, Diego Suarez, Aden, Suez, Diego Suarez, Capetown, Freetown, Boston.
348 September 6th 1942 – November 27th 1942 Boston, New York, Rio de Janeiro, Capetown, Aden, Suez, Aden, Fremantle, Wellington.
349 December 12th 1942 – February 26th 1943 Wellington, Fremantle, Port Tewfik, Massawa, Port Tewfik, Massawa, H.M. Base East Indies, Fremantle, Sydney.
350 March 23rd 1943 – May 31st 1943 Sydney, Fremantle, Capetown, Rio de Janeiro, New York, Clyde.
351 May 31st 1943 – July 15th 1943 Clyde, New York (dry-dock), Clyde.
352 July 21st 1943 – August 11th 1943 Clyde, New York, Clyde.
353 August 16th 1943 – October 9th 1943 Clyde, New York, Clyde.
354 October 12th 1943 – October 29th 1943 Clyde, New York, Clyde.
355-62 November 4th 1943 – June 29th 1944 Clyde, New York, Clyde.
363-74 July 3rd 1944 – May 16th 1945 North Atlantic voyages – Clyde-Halifax (4), Clyde-New York (8).


I'd better apologise in advance, as it was in a tabular format in a Word document and I am not sure if the lines will all come out OK in this post. I think it should be clear enough -- it's the voyage number(s) followed by the dates and then the destinations.

I should say that I have seen one or two dates contradicted in other sources. It always gets complicated trying to sort these things; I've merely copied the data from a set of documents in the Cunard archives which were summarised on a sheet or two. I am involved in a small writing project related to Aquitania, and have noted one or two discrepencies in the list but those were displayed as footnotes in another file and I don't have the disk with me right now. Apologies.

Best wishes,

Mark.

Baltic Wal
5th February 2007, 17:52
OK I'll copy my list as it is dates listed port by port plus convoy numbers, could be of assistance to you Mark.

Ian

Baltic Wal
5th February 2007, 19:21
OK here it is, not well formatted but id departure date, Departure port, arrival date, arrival port and convoy.

10/12/1939 Halifax 17/12/1939 Clyde TC 001
16/01/1939 Clyde 21/01/1940 Halifax Indep
30/01/1940 Halifax 07/02/1940 Clyde TC 003
09/03/1940 Clyde 16/03/1940 Freetown Indep
19/03/1940 Freetown 25/03/1940 Cape Town Indep
27/03/1940 Cape Town 03/04/1940 Fremantle Indep
06/04/1940 Fremantle 20/04/1940 Wellington Indep
02/05/1940 Wellington 16/06/1940 Clyde US 003
29/06/1940 Liverpool 29/07/1940 Colombo WS 001
10/08/1940 Fremantle 15/08/1940 Sydney Indep
05/09/1940 Fremantle 15/09/1940 Bombay US 004
22/09/1940 Bombay 30/09/1940 Fremantle Indep
01/10/1940 Fremantle 06/10/1940 Sydney Indep
20/10/1940 Sydney 04/11/1940 Bombay US 004
06/11/1940 Bombay 16/11/1940 Fremantle Indep
19/11/1940 Fremantle 24/11/1940 Sydney Indep
19/12/1940 Wellington 12/01/1941 Colombo US 008
14/01/1941 Trincomalee Sydney Indep
04/02/1941 Sydney 22/02/1941 Bombay US 009
05/03/1941 Bombay 11/03/1941 Singapore WS 5BX
07/04/1941 Wellington 26/04/1941 Colombo US 010
06/05/1941 Colombo 11/05/1941 dispersed US 010B
22/05/1941 Suez 25/06/1941 Wellington Indep
09/07/1941 Fremantle 29/07/1941 Suez US 011A
30/07/1941 Suez 22/08/1941 Sydney Indep
15/09/1941 Sydney 18/09/1941 Wellington VK 019
28/09/1941 Fremantle 19/10/1941 Suez US 012B
20/10/1941 Suez 27/10/1941 Bombay Indep
31/10/1941 Bombay 27/10/1941 Colombo Indep
02/11/1941 Colombo 11/11/1941 Singapore Indep
19/11/1941 Singapore 28/11/1941 Sydney Indep
27/12/1941 Sydney 04/01/1942 Port Moresby Indep
04/01/1942 Port Moresby 09/01/1942 Sydney Indep
10/01/1942 Sydney 20/01/1942 Ratai Bay, Java MS 002
20/01/1942 Ratai Bay Java 25/01/1942 Fremantle Indep
28/01/1942 Fremantle 31/01/1942 Sydney Indep
10/02/1942 Sydney 01/03/1942 San Francisco Indep
10/03/1942 San Francisco 14/03/1942 Honolulu Indep
20/03/1942 Honolulu 24/03/1942 San Francisco Indep
31/03/1942 San Francisco 03/04/1942 Honolulu Indep
06/04/1942 Honolulu 10/04/1942 Los Angeles Indep
10/04/1942 Los Angeles 23/04/1942 New York City Indep
28/04/1942 New York 11/05/1942 Belfast AT 015
31/05/1942 Clyde 06/06/1942 detached as WS 19Q WS 019P
06/06/1942 Detached 08/07/1942 Suez WS 019Q
10/07/1942 Suez 14/08/1942 Boston Indep
06/09/1942 Boston 07/09/1942 New York City Indep
21/09/1942 New York 31/10/1942 Suez AS 007
03/11/1942 Suez 27/11/1942 Wellington Indep
11/12/1942 Wellington 05/01/1943 Suez US 016
09/01/1943 Suez 11/01/1943 Massawa Indep
23/01/1943 Massawa 25/01/1943 Suez Indep
27/01/1943 Suez 27/02/1943 Sydney PAMPHLET
23/03/1943 Sydney 04/05/1943 New York City Indep
10/05/1943 New York 18/05/1943 Clyde AT 421
31/05/1943 Clyde 08/06/1943 New York City TA 42A
08/07/1943 New York 15/07/1943 Clyde AT 53
21/07/1943 Clyde 28/07/1943 New York City TA 53
04/08/1943 New York 11/08/1943 Clyde AT 57
16/08/1943 Clyde 23/08/1943 New York City TA 57
30/09/1943 New York 09/10/1943 Clyde AT 65
12/10/1943 Clyde 18/10/1943 Halifax TA 65
23/10/1943 Halifax 29/10/1943 Clyde AT 70
04/11/1943 Clyde 12/11/1943 New York City TA 70
17/11/1943 New York 24/11/1943 Clyde AT 74
30/11/1943 Clyde 06/12/1943 New York City TA 74
12/12/1943 New York 19/12/1943 Clyde AT 79
22/12/1943 Clyde 30/12/1943 New York City TA 79
02/01/1944 New York 10/01/1944 Clyde AT 85
14/01/1944 Clyde 25/01/1944 New York City TA 85
29/01/1944 New York 05/02/1944 Clyde AT 89
09/02/1944 Clyde 17/02/1944 New York City TA 89
21/02/1944 New York 28/02/1944 Clyde AT 94
02/03/1944 Clyde 09/03/1944 New York City TA 94
14/03/1944 New York 21/03/1944 Clyde AT 100
26/03/1944 Clyde 03/04/1944 New York City TA 100
06/04/1944 New York 13/04/1944 Clyde AT 106
17/04/1944 Clyde 25/04/1944 Boston TA 106
24/06/1944 Boston 29/06/1944 Clyde AT 124
04/07/1944 Clyde 11/07/1944 New York City TA 124
15/07/1944 New York 21/07/1944 Clyde AT133
26/07/1944 Clyde 02/08/1944 New York City TA 133
07/08/1944 New York 14/08/1944 Clyde AT 141
17/08/1944 Clyde 23/08/1944 Halifax TA 141
30/08/1944 Halifax 04/09/1944 Clyde AT 147
13/09/1944 Clyde 21/09/1944 New York City TA 147
27/09/1944 New York 04/10/1944 Clyde AT 154
09/10/1944 Clyde 17/10/1944 New York City TA 154
21/10/1944 New York 28/10/1944 Clyde AT 161
02/11/1944 Clyde 09/11/1944 New York City TA 161
15/11/1944 New York 22/11/1944 Clyde AT 167
26/11/1944 Clyde 04/12/1944 New York City TA 167
15/12/1944 New York 29/12/1944 Clyde AT 176
04/01/1945 Clyde 12/01/1945 New York City TA 176
23/01/1945 New York 30/01/1945 Clyde AT 184
06/02/1945 Clyde 14/02/1945 Halifax TA 184
24/02/1945 Halifax 03/03/1945 Clyde AT 192
08/03/1945 Clyde 14/03/1945 Halifax TA 192
20/03/1945 Halifax 28/03/1945 Clyde AT 199
01/04/1945 Clyde 08/04/1945 Halifax TA 199
14/04/1945 Halifax 21/04/1945 Clyde AT 204
26/04/1945 Clyde 05/05/1945 New York City TA 204
09/05/1945 New York Clyde AT 208
21/05/1945 Clyde 28/05/1945 New York City TA 208
09/06/1945 New York 15/06/1945 Clyde AT 212

ggrammer
6th February 2007, 03:36
To All,

Does anyone remember the approximate time in Aquitania's career where her bridge was modified from its Promenade deck level? I have an early photograph just after her fitting out of her original bridge placement. It seems that it might have been modified during WW1 when she temporarily was fitted out as an armed merchant. Certainly her new bridge position was evident in her sailings in the "twenties". I have never heard the real explanation for this modification. Your replies please.

George Grammer

Baltic Wal
6th February 2007, 09:05
After her service as an AMC the Officers complained about the views from the bridge, which resulted in a collision with the Leyland liner CANADIAN. When this short service ended she had a Wooden wheelhouse fitted.

She had this enlarged during the second world war as I have sen photo's of her in service with the two bridge styles. Probably took place when she had a refit in Singapore, end 1941/

Mark Chirnside
7th February 2007, 15:22
Goodness, thanks for the list Ian. I had not seen some of the convoy numbers before; I have not cross-checked them yet but it looks like the voyages all tie in with the one in Cunard's archives.

The interesting thing about the bridge is that Aquitania's original, 1910 specification book stipulated that the bridge should be situated for a good view ahead. You'd think this would be obvious, but they put it in the specification anyway, and it looks like it didn't work!

Best wishes,

Mark.