Underwater Radio Transmission

Jan7
3rd April 2008, 14:21
Hi Martin, welcome to the site, a couple of posts ago you just answered a question I posed here a few weeks ago....could subs communicate by radio under water...From your posts it looks like the answer is no. I'd heard tales of them towing a long wire behind the vessel but obviously that's just not so. Anyway I hope you enjoy the site.

Dear Thunerd, the subs may be communicate submerged. If are in the Low Frequencies ( 15-60 KHz frequencies and minus) who whas capable of penetrate in the water a few -tipically 6-12 meter....

All of the rest of radio waves, not have this curious property. See and read this link (http://www.fas.org/spp/military/docops/afwa/U2.htm)....



Jan.

non descript
3rd April 2008, 14:50
Jan, as the post was not Fact or Fiction, I have taken the liberty of moving your posting to a fresh location in line with the subject.
(Thumb)

Gavin Gait
3rd April 2008, 15:02
The US Navy uses Ultra-Low Frequency down to 10khz but the data transmission rate is very low ( 3-4 characters per second ) and these are received aboard submarines by them towing a very long cable with a small hydrofoil body on the end which comes up near the surface when the sub is typically at 4-500ft deep.

Jan7
3rd April 2008, 15:04
Many thanks, Tonga!

In (U-Historia Forum) I posted more information on the Goliath transmitter, the powerest radio transmitter in the World War Two -From the german U-Boote. Are in Spanish language, and is possible translate online means Google or similar machines.
Sobre el Transmisor "Goliath" (http://www.u-historia.com/uhistoria/foro/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=399&hilit=Goliath)


Jan.

surfaceblow
3rd April 2008, 15:56
While on the USNS Kane in the mid 80's we use to tow an array that made underwater noises like a Russian Sub. The ideal was to give the US subs some practice tracking.

While on our round about track we picked up an Russian Sub that tried to talk to our array.(H)

Jan7
3rd April 2008, 16:14
Dear Surfaceblow: And your sub answered his questions :cool: ......?

Do you can explain more of this matter?

Jan.

surfaceblow
3rd April 2008, 18:22
We had a tape of Russian Sub noises that we would send to the towed array so it would mimic a Russian Sub under water thur speakers. On the other channels on the array you could pick up the normal information like the depth, water temp, water density, map the bottom, and pick up water noises. The "Scientists" on board would then listen for the American Subs and underwater noises using the Tow Array and the sonar and underwater radio setup. Most of the information would than be drawn on a very large plotter. The plotter would often pick up schools of fish, thermal layers and other interesting bits.

The real Russian Sub after hearing and tracking the fake Russian Sub (the towed array) tried to communicate with us.

Jan7
3rd April 2008, 18:43
Its a very interesting information!

Many thanks for share (Thumb)!

Jan.

Norm
11th April 2008, 08:33
The new Australian Collins class subs have a tube like device fitted aft, out of which they tow the very long comunications wire when submerged.
.I believe the USAF base Edzel in Fife Scotland had a large transmitting/recieveing coil buried in the ground. It was used for very low frequency communication with submarines. The low frequency signal could permeate the ground and ocean and be picked up by nuclear submarines. Even though satellite transmission is now the thing, I'll bet it's still there.
If you dont see any more posts from me, you'll know the CIA came knockin'.

Jan7
11th April 2008, 09:40
If you dont see any more posts from me, you'll know the CIA came knockin'.

I hope that this question not will pass......

Many thanks for share to you, dear Norm!


Jan.

Bill Greig
11th April 2008, 12:56
Norm,
Edzel is in Angus, Scotland, and is now closed down, but you are probaby right about the buried coil. Whose that at the door?

surfaceblow
11th April 2008, 15:13
Also on the Kane we also tested the fixed system of arrays of underwater hydrophones. It was possible to sit above the hydrophone and put through a phone call to the listening station and they would call your home number for you.
One of the nice things is that the Coast Guard could not look in our Oil Record Book unless we black out the positions recorded since you could figure out where we have been.

Norm
14th April 2008, 02:42
Bill, Fit like loon? I knew that, but I was trying to keep the exact location a secret. Now the CIA will be looking for you !! (or their friends the MI5) LOL

Bill Greig
14th April 2008, 12:56
Norm,
in the words of Homer Simpson "DOH"!

Jan7
9th November 2008, 18:45
Dear friends and others:

This article its very interesting: http://www.godfreydykes.info/SUBMARINE%20RADIO%20TRAFFIC%20FROM%20THE%20RUGBY%2 0TRANSMITTER.htm







Jan.

benjidog
9th November 2008, 19:18
Dear friends and others:

This article its very interesting: http://www.godfreydykes.info/SUBMARINE%20RADIO%20TRAFFIC%20FROM%20THE%20RUGBY%2 0TRANSMITTER.htm

Jan.

Thanks for the link Jan. Mr Godfrey's site is quite difficult to navigate but there are indeed some interesting things there.