Need help in ship's bow design

Tidalstreamjohn
8th April 2008, 19:12
Hello, new to this site, happened to wander by... Am designing a tidal stream generating system that has to survive 12+ knots, rough water etc in the Pentland Firth, low drag, buoyant, good storm resistance. The structure will be more submerged than not, deadweight about 350 tons. I would like to find someone interested in ship's design who can advise on bow shapes for the structure that supports the turbine... please let me know.

K urgess
8th April 2008, 23:04
Welcome aboard from East Yorkshire, John.
I'm sure you'll find someone who will be able to help among the crew.
Meanwhile find your way around the ship and enjoy the voyage.

benjidog
8th April 2008, 23:25
Welcome from Lancashire.

I hope you will enjoy the site.

Regards,

Brian

Gulpers
8th April 2008, 23:27
John,

A warm welcome to the site from the Isle of Anglesey!
I hope you thoroughly enjoy the SN experience and get many happy hours entertainment from your membership. (Thumb)

gdynia
9th April 2008, 06:05
Welcome onboard to SN and enjoy the voyage

JimC
10th April 2008, 21:11
Hello, new to this site, happened to wander by... Am designing a tidal stream generating system that has to survive 12+ knots, rough water etc in the Pentland Firth, low drag, buoyant, good storm resistance. The structure will be more submerged than not, deadweight about 350 tons. I would like to find someone interested in ship's design who can advise on bow shapes for the structure that supports the turbine... please let me know.
I take it the turbine will be suspended from the underside of the floatation arrangement and that any bow design must not interefere with the flow into the turbine system
If so, there would be a problem with conventional ship's bow design. Such a design creates minimum turbulence and drag but tends to push water to either side. Possibly a catamaran arrangement with concave inner sides to the hulls might be considered. It might also be possible to incorporate a venturi effect thus increasing speed of flow across the turbine props/blades. Just a few ideas.
As you may know - there is also a problem in the Pentland Firth which many of us have encountered. This is to do with sudden, violent, unaccounted-for changes in current direction. In this case; an efficient rudder system would be of great importance - a bit like a self-steering vane which would align the structure with the direction of current flow. Don't know how you're going to maintain current alignment while encorporating some type positon keeping or mooring system but sounds very interesting and no doubt - great fun.

Lots of luck amd welcome to our world!

Jim C.