Copy this sparks !

Gareth Jones
11th April 2008, 15:49
Have you still got the old skills can you copy this ? If it works there should be an attached file!

Gareth Jones
11th April 2008, 16:01
For anyone interested, I did this by feeding sidetone from an electronic keyer into the 'line in' on my PC - then using 'Sound recorder' to make a recording as a WMA file.
The WMA file was then converted to an MP3 file using a free program called Jodix. When converting the file select 32 Kbps bit rate, 32Khz sample rate and Mono. Thats it.
You should be able to create a file which will give you about 4 mins morse (keeping within the 1 Mb forum limit on MP3 files) slower morse will give you more time and faster morse gives you less.
I should think it could be done using a manual key with an oscillator/sig gen ?

BA204259
11th April 2008, 16:05
Quote
sn sn sn de gj = s hi oms just a reminder of how we used to chat in our seagoing days, sorry for any errors and scratchiness but my old fingers and key havent done this for 24 years, I'll add another post to explain how I did it. I hope to receive a reply in morse? anyway best 73's = gareth jones

Unquote

Guess that must be a gash s before hi oms?

Gareth Jones
11th April 2008, 16:12
Quote
sn sn sn de gj = s hi oms just a reminder of how we used to chat in our seagoing days, sorry for any errors and scratchiness but my old fingers and key havent done this for 24 years, I'll add another post to explain how I did it. I hope to receive a reply in morse? anyway best 73's = gareth jones

Unquote

Guess that must be a gash s before hi oms?

quite right - put that in to keep you on your toes (Jester) !!!

BA204259
11th April 2008, 16:17
Gareth
I expect you to easily copy this 30 wpm on your PC keyboard.... if you're really good you can do it on the keyboard of a laptop...(==D)
I must add it isn't my morse!

K urgess
11th April 2008, 16:36
Gareth's was reasonably easy.
But couldn't do that then BA, so doing it now took some concentration. Reasonably OK until we got to numbers.
I used to cheat at sea and record it. Played it back at a slower speed for transcription at my leisure. [=P]

Gareth Jones
11th April 2008, 16:41
Gareth
I expect you to easily copy this 30 wpm on your PC keyboard.... if you're really good you can do it on the keyboard of a laptop...(==D)
I must add it isn't my morse!

nah! its too long and too many numbers in it !(Jester)

surprisingly after all these years i can still read it, but having trouble typing on this keyboard at that speed - learned to copy morse on the old GPO typewriters which only had capital letters, and never really graduated to modern pc keyboards. Need to practise !

BA204259
11th April 2008, 17:02
If I told you that was me practising with my left foot, you wouldn't believe me, would you?:sweat: Know what you mean about the keyboards, I learned on some old World War 2 radio teletype machines. Great keyboards for morse, having only capital letters made life so much easier..

R651400
11th April 2008, 19:03
Gareth I expect you to easily copy this 30 wpm on your PC keyboard.... if you're really good you can do it on the keyboard of a laptop...(==D)
I must add it isn't my morse!

adequate flying weather for the helicopter. then the crew will move as fast as possible to get all men and gear safely ashore before the weather window closes. the group is hoping for two full weeks of operation from peter i. plans to have nine stations with eight amplifiers ready to be on any open band 24 hours a day. so there may be more than one station on a band at a time. suggested frequencies are as follows cw 1826.5, 3504, 7004, 10104/10124, 14024, 18074, 21024, 24894, 28024, 50115 ssb 3799, 7057, 14195, 18145, 21295, 24945, 28475, 50115 rtty 14080, 21080, 28080 details were still coming together as we went to press.
Gave up on next sentence when it asked for a contribution!
Message refers to an amateur DX-pedition to the Kerguelen Islands in the South Indian ocean. Passed same on a trip to Oz when Suez was closed.
For wx window read wx porthole!

More news here; http://www.papays.com/rag0904.pdf

BA204259
11th April 2008, 19:07
R651400

You're a star:)

R651400
11th April 2008, 19:38
R651400 You're a star:)

Thanks your kind words BA204259. Amateur CW contesting helps to keep the hand in.
Am curious at your BA (Buenos Aires) number. 1956 BA558 1960 BA204259, surely not possible?

BA204259
11th April 2008, 19:44
Am curious at your BA (Buenos Aires) number. 1956 BA558 1960 BA204259, surely not possible?

It is an' all, looking at it now. BA/2042 dated 3rd November '59. Not too sure about the 18 year-old pretty boy staring back at me though.... Well, OK then, not that pretty, but at least I had hair!

R651400
11th April 2008, 21:17
Thanks your kind words BA204259. Amateur CW contesting helps to keep the hand in.
Am curious at your BA (Buenos Aires) number. 1956 BA558 1960 BA204259, surely not possible?


Hair or the lack of a very touchy subject BA204259, I know the feeling well. It's good to live in times where one can say my "coiffure" is "a la mode!"

March 56 to November 59, over three and a half years, approximately 1500 PMG passes, less than 500 a year. Little wonder GTZM was battering down the radio college doors.

tunatownshipwreck
11th April 2008, 21:17
My computer doesn't have a bfo.

BA204259
11th April 2008, 21:36
Little wonder GTZM was battering down the radio college doors.

Don't think they were at that time, there was a mini recession going on. I applied to all three radio companies in December '59 and none of them were recruiting. I resolved to go with the first one who offered me a job and IMRCo did so in March '60 and I had another month to wait before being sent to my first ship. The recession was of course laughable compared with what was to come later, but seemed pretty bad at the time

R651400
11th April 2008, 21:54
1960 had just gone free lance from Blueys. In '56 when I collected my ticket from college I circumvented GTZM Leith to avoid the harpoon. Was thinking more along the lines number of ships flying the Red Duster and PMG passes per year. In four years conditions had obviously polarised.

Ron Stringer
11th April 2008, 22:14
I applied to all three radio companies in December '59 and none of them were recruiting. I resolved to go with the first one who offered me a job and IMRCo did so in March '60 and I had another month to wait before being sent to my first ship.

BA I applied to MIMco after I qualified in November 1959 and was accepted but told that there were no available ships on which to do my 6-month supervised seatime. I took a job as a labourer in a warehouse and worked there until a vacancy arrived in June 1960 and I was asked to join Elders & Fyffes 'Golfito' in Avonmouth. As 3rd R/O on that ship, I was paid 40% of what I had been earning as a labourer ashore!

BA204259
12th April 2008, 00:12
As 3rd R/O on that ship, I was paid 40% of what I had been earning as a labourer ashore!

BoT/Radio Company rate for new R/O's - £32 per month rising to £36 pm after six months. Wonder if R651400 can remember pay rates on Niarchos at that time?

K urgess
12th April 2008, 00:38
BoT/Radio Company rate for new R/O's - £32 per month rising to £36 pm after six months. Wonder if R651400 can remember pay rates on Niarchos at that time?

Didn't get much more than that in 1966 as a newbie with MimCo. £45 per month as a starter.
It took about 5 years before I cracked the hundred quid a month barrier.

R651400
12th April 2008, 08:16
Wonder if R651400 can remember pay rates on Niarchos at that time?

£75 p.m. comes to mind BA204259.

BA204259
12th April 2008, 11:04
£75 p.m. comes to mind.....

Lot of money in those days. Remember when I joined the "St Helena"/GBTJ In early '62 I relieved a freelance R/O who was on £75 pm. My own salary would have been in the low £40's. I know I was sorely tempted but never plucked up the courage to take the plunge.

R651400
12th April 2008, 12:48
Lot of money in those days.
My last was over £100.
Greek owners norm being the R/O was paid the same as the mate, only the Master and CE were higher. Dropped to £28 or maybe £32 when I moved to GKA!

K urgess
12th April 2008, 14:08
Excuse my ignorance but is the Buenos Aires number your PMG/1 number?
Never did like the purple colour of those which is why I've still got a black one. Much nicer colour.[=P]
Mine's G/2303 issued in 1966.
My authority to operate was pasted over in 1976 because of the new article 23 of the Radio Regulations, Geneva, 1976.
I notice I had it endorsed for 6 months and 1 year but never bothered for 2 years serviced. Naughty boy, considering I was at sea for 11 years.
I certainly look deadly serious with my button down collar and definitely serious haircut.
Cheers
Kris

Degema
12th April 2008, 15:35
Got a purple one number BA847 issued 17 May 1960. Went with Marconi and joined my first ship Shell Tanker on 30 May 1960. Tried freelance later on. Was getting £34 a month with Marconi which went up to £75 when I joined the Greeks.

R651400
12th April 2008, 16:09
Excuse my ignorance but is the Buenos Aires number your PMG/1 number?

BA, Buenos Aires was 1950's and was on all PMG's after the convention date. I think C... Cairo was the one previous. What followed have no idea.

BA204259
12th April 2008, 16:28
Excuse my ignorance but is the Buenos Aires number your PMG/1 number?


Yes, BA from the Buenos Aires convention (to sort out frequency and c/s allocations etc). Mine is black and only a second class. Always meant to go back and get the first class but forever seemed to be enjoying myself too much and/or couldn't afford it. By the time I could afford it the future Mrs BA204259 was around to have a say in the matter, so I came ashore. The BA convention was followed at some time in the sixties by the Geneva convention - hence the G number on your ticket.

K urgess
12th April 2008, 19:53
BA, Buenos Aires was 1950's and was on all PMG's after the convention date. I think C... Cairo was the one previous. What followed have no idea.

If that was all PMGs then they'd got to G by May 1966. Must've been a new convention or more in between.
My radar, dated 30th December 1965, is number 3021 by the way.

Ivor Lloyd
12th April 2008, 20:53
When I joined GTZM in 1942 as first tripper I was on £9 - 17s- 6d per month. This was supplemented by a war bonus of £10 per month whilst at sea.

Ivor R297868

petesake
12th April 2008, 21:01
BA I applied to MIMco after I qualified in November 1959 and was accepted but told that there were no available ships on which to do my 6-month supervised seatime. I took a job as a labourer in a warehouse and worked there until a vacancy arrived in June 1960 and I was asked to join Elders & Fyffes 'Golfito' in Avonmouth. As 3rd R/O on that ship, I was paid 40% of what I had been earning as a labourer ashore!

you were overpaid in both jobs.

R651400
13th April 2008, 06:22
I still maintain that the radio company stranglehold on the vast percentage of British shipping had a lot to do with R/0 pay.
I cannot remember a single Blue Funnel R/O being a member of the ROU. I was told on joining, it was a paper-tiger and not worth wasting my money.
Greek operators had a different outlook and those with foc flagged ships employed R/O's of any nationality. If I may be so bold, Niarchos preferred British because of the high standard required to pass the PMG.
£75 pm in '59 was really a free-lance minimum. There were bigger players like Onassis, Universe Tankships, NBC etc but they were almost dead man's shoes.

Ron Stringer
13th April 2008, 08:30
you were overpaid in both jobs.

Curses! Yet another one that didn't appreciate my true worth. Is there no end to them?

Ron Stringer
13th April 2008, 08:34
Looking at it from the "glass half full" point of view, the low NMB/radio company pay rates for R/Os meant that it didn't come as so much of a shock when you left the sea to take a job ashore. Dropping your income by 50% from seagoing money to shore money was bad enough. I'm not sure that my mind could have handled an 80% drop.

Moulder
13th April 2008, 10:47
Did you get paid leave when 'freelance' or Greek flag?

(Thumb)

Tai Pan
13th April 2008, 12:25
My maroonwas BA64. that was 1955. signed by L Harris Ward. MIMC wages in 1951 was £5 per week. still got wages slip from 1st Bluie in 1952. 1 guinea a day. (£30.10 per month)

Tai Pan
13th April 2008, 12:40
amazing what you find when you root around, found my first foreign going pay slip, "Asturias" GLQS I think, dated 18 may 1951. rate of pay £8 per month. 3rd R/O. in 1952 Esso Bedford still shows £8 per month. went to Holts in 1952 for £31.10 shillings a month as 2nd R/O, plus leave. last pay chit Glengarry was £67.10 per month(1960) was it any wonder I moved.

R651400
13th April 2008, 13:01
1 guinea a day. (£30.10 per month)

Things hadn't moved much in four years my monthly pay I think was the same. Oh those lovely crisp "A4 size" white five pound notes. Real money.
Leave was unpaid free-lancing but who cared with that sort of pay.
December '62 Marchessini offered me a retainer if I would stay, but my seafaring days were over. QTP CL AR VA...

athinai
13th April 2008, 14:45
Think Niarchos were paying about £147 around 1966, Remember ''All Salaries were Negotiable'' if you could get past the Famous ''ID''. Supply and Demand was the Catchword., and is still in todays society. I only did short term Contracts of Minimum Two Max Six (Months) If I stood by or sailed for less than 2 months I would get the full 2 months pay etc., (Should they decide to give u the Heave Ho or whatever.) They also paid your National Insurance, all though I might be wrong on that one, it was certainly deducted. My Grandmother was dying and I received a Cable from Home approaching the PG, I cabled Loniar London and was relieved Kharg Island and flown home at Their expence. I came back after the Funeral etc., Busy Ships for R/O's.
Rgds/

K urgess
13th April 2008, 14:58
So when I came ashore after 11 years with Marconi I was even worse off than I thought!
Including tanker bonus, radar bonus, electronics bonus, 11 years seniority I was on £9k pa. With leave at 1 for 2 that adds another £4.5k to the package.
So in reality I was getting the equivalent of £13.5k pa. Oh yes and the free food and accommodation on top.
I came ashore to a job as a shore side technician that paid just under £3k pa. Which was the national average at the time.
Shows how much I needed to get out of a dying trade.[=P]
The only regret is that it's the only professional qualification I've ever had and now it's a museum piece.

macrae
13th April 2008, 15:58
Hi Gareth,
Thats amazing !
Hav'nt heard morse for over 40 years and was able to copy it OK.
Brought back a lot of memories.
Thanks for posting it,
kind regards
Macrae

ChasD
13th April 2008, 16:48
Nice one Gareth ! = R QSL TKS = Good to see the old brain cells can still be stirred up from the residual sludge ! There has been mention made of interest in the old dots and dashes, and the fact that it is now drifting into obscurity. I had toyed with the idea of using "Skype" to set up a "Skypecast" dedicated to morse users. There are obviously dedicated users among the Radio Amature groups, but this requires the relevant ticket and is fairly restricted. Using something like a Skypecast would allow any interested devotee to comunicate, and learn from the Olduns, with no more than a key and an oscillator. Any thoughts ?

R651400
13th April 2008, 17:35
but this requires the relevant ticket and is fairly restricted.

Entry into the amateur world has never been easier.
Foundation licence is a simple multiple choice test. My nephew has just passed after a brief course with a radio club, the test conducted under the same auspices.
Foundation allows any mode, morse/speech/digital but restricted to 10W output.
Next step up is the intermediate, well within any ex R/O's grasp. A bit stiffer than the foundation but with a pass, 100w output.
Morse is far from dead and since it is no longer a compulsory part of the amateur syllabus, a lot of newcomers are trying it out and enjoying the experience.

R651400
13th April 2008, 17:52
Niarchos pay £70 to £147 in six years was a big jump. They definitely paid my NHS stamps which I was thankful for. After leaving the sea I had one trip to the dole office and was given a job before I could claim any unemployment. £11 pw, it certainly showed me a different world to what I'd been used to.
Url below will lead into SN member Ian Coombes'/VE2DOH excellent website showing a letter from Niarchos dated 1960 offering him a job at £70 plus bonuses.

http://iancoombe.tripod.com/id20.html

Tai Pan
14th April 2008, 14:41
6am this morning, it came to me how we were paid by MIMC. it was £20 per month, you had a pay book, MIMC paid your tax, NHI and union dues, plus any allotment. on signing articles the pay rate was £8 per month, this was for your onboard usage, eg bar, postage, giggies, cash advance and best of all, Channel Money ( how nostalgic). you paid off and then visited MIMC office and handed in your pay off slip, your pay book was then deducted the gross amont. If you needed extra cash abroad you had to visit MIMC office, along with pay book, not a good idea especially around India, could get shanghaied. this book also recorded your leave entitlment, plus any leave taken, my pages were snow white as I never had been given any leave in 18 months. I wonder if that was still in use many years later?

K urgess
14th April 2008, 14:56
Oh Yes, John.
The paybook was still going strong when I handed mine in after resigning in 1977.
The only bit you really needed was the little advances book with the pink pages.
It went up to a maximum of £24 per month before they started signing us on for a shilling/5p and taking a cheque for shipboard expenses.
I never had to hand in my pay off slip 'cos the bill was settled at signing off if you'd gone over the allowance and the shipowner notified MimCo how long you'd been onboard.
I'm still bloody annoyed that Marconi dumped skips full of Paybooks dating back to when it all began. All that history down the landfill or incinerator. (Cloud)
Kris

BA204259
14th April 2008, 15:07
Never had a paybook (that I can remember) with IMRCo. On signing articles we had the choice of opting for a sub of £4, £8 or £12 per month. Having always had ideas above my station I opted for £12 every time. IMR would pay my salary (less the £12) into my bank account. If I was in a foreign port and needed more cash I had to find out if IMR had a local agent and could usually get a fiver from them. Only had to have my tap stopped once and then for only a short time. Didn't take long to recover on £12 a month, did it? :)

trotterdotpom
14th April 2008, 15:45
Thanks for reminding me about that paybook, I've no idea what happened to mine. I suppose I returned it.

I seem to recall that BoT leave was 23 days per year plus half-days for Saturdays on articles and Sundays at Sea. I used to diligently record times of arrival and departure in a diary and then tot up the Sundays for my leave application. Eventually it dawned on me that nobody knew how many Sundays were at sea except me!

Not that it mattered really as they always called you back before your leave was up anyway.

John T.

Ron Stringer
14th April 2008, 22:13
on signing articles the pay rate was £8 per month, this was for your onboard usage, eg bar, postage, giggies, cash advance and best of all, Channel Money ( how nostalgic).

John,

While I was at sea with Marconi in the early 1960s, the money on board was an advance on your wages. You had to nominate in advance (no pun intended) the amount that you wanted on board and could choose from £4, £8 or £12 per month. From what Kris says, the amount was increased in later years - I suppose to adjust for price inflation.

Tai Pan
15th April 2008, 10:07
Thanks Ron. its all fitting in place now.

BobClay
15th April 2008, 10:46
The morse message was certainly a blast from the past. :-). Haven't done that in a while. Left the sea in 1986 and eventually joined GCHQ in 1988. They had a pretty instensive training course which included reasonably fast morse requirement, but on leaving the training school atTaunton (now defunct) I never heard a note of morse again. Just stood by computers in a satellite station !

Worked for Marconi, Kelvin Hughes, Freelance and finally CP Ships. When I started in 1970 I was on less money than when I had been a fireman/greaser at sea in 1967, which made me wonder what I was doing for a while.

Have a few pics of radio rooms at: http://www.bob-clay.co.uk/Sea.htm

trotterdotpom
15th April 2008, 11:44
Enjoyed your website, Bob. Could the wreck at Hartland Point be Johanna - went aground New Years Eve 1982? There are a couple of photos in the gallery.

John T.

mikeg
15th April 2008, 15:27
Nice Website Bob. Which CP ships were you on? I did a few trips on the Container ship CP Voyageur in late 1972, the first ship I took my wife away on as well - the north Atlantic in winter :-)
Is that a Heathkit Automatic morse keyer in the photo's?

Mike

King Ratt
15th April 2008, 16:55
For Bob Clay. Very interesting website, Bob. Think our paths may have crossed way back. Were you in Leith Nautical College decades ago?

Cheers

R Thomson.

R651400
16th April 2008, 19:40
Knocked this up on my portable MP3 player. Had to make it in two parts because limit on SN mp3 upload. Sounded a lot better in WAV but should bring back a few memories and maybe recognition in there for some members.
Neville, hope the note sounds right!!

K urgess
16th April 2008, 19:58
Brought tears to the eyes. :sweat:

Only getting the left channel though.

King Ratt
16th April 2008, 20:15
cq cq cq de gld gld gqtc elir elir gmrs gmrs gohn gohn qtkx gtkx ibba ibba kjeh kjeh hlvc hvlc de gld qtc 5tt.
Nice one R651400-I wasn't on his list!

R651400
16th April 2008, 20:37
GTZM-S... R/hand channel disappeared when I converted to MP3. Running headphones so as not to disturb the Memsahib?? Rmbr the Atlanta wasn't stereophonic...

KR... Last one wasn't Korean or Vatican even if it is the Pope's birthday today! Recognise any of the call-signs?

BA204259
16th April 2008, 21:06
Nice drop of cream there, lovely tone. I recognise two of the c/s:-

Ivernia/GTKX

United States/KJEH


Don't remember the Italian one but will guess that its the Leonardo da Vinci, Guglielmo Marconi or Galileo Galilei.

Edit: was the Liberian registered 5LVC one of your Greeks?

K urgess
16th April 2008, 21:07
Wanted to heighten the experience using the phones. [=P]
You're right about the Atalanta but mono comes out into both ears.
I keep meaning to rig up my key and do a bit of practice.
We did have another thread somewhere that had links to morse practice sites but I can't find it any more.
One of 'em was called "morsemail".

Gareth Jones
16th April 2008, 22:07
Here's one I use.

http://morsecode.scphillips.com/jtranslator.html


73's


Gareth

K urgess
16th April 2008, 23:15
You can get morsemail here (http://brasspounder.com:8873/).
It allows you to use your mouse buttons as your morse key.
I'm trying to adapt an old mouse so that I can connect a morse key to it.
With your PC recording software set to pick up and record any sound you can capture the morse to wav and then convert it quite easily to mp3 or whatever.

trotterdotpom
17th April 2008, 02:05
King R - think that last one should be 5LVC not HLVC - are you sure you're not on the list? Just kidding.

John T.

R651400
17th April 2008, 08:30
Ivernia/GTKX United States/KJEH Don't remember the Italian one but will guess that its the Leonardo da Vinci, Guglielmo Marconi or Galilei Galileo.
Edit: was the Liberian registered 5LVC one of your Greeks?

All the ships excepting two are H24, quoted from memory except GTKX which I got from one of your postings.Thought you would have got ELIR.
IBBA not sure if CC, LdV or maybe Andrea Doria!
"World Banner/5LVC."
Another SN member should recognise only H8 on the list.

BA204259
17th April 2008, 09:05
Can't finger ELIR, my guess is that it is another of your Liberian registered Greeks. GOHN rings a faint bell but, as you mention H24 can only hazard a wild guess at P&O-Orient. Ditto GMRS. Doubt IBBA is Andrea Doria, more likely CC or one of the others... beautiful ships. Plus the fact that AD sank in July '56.

Bill Greig
17th April 2008, 09:23
Nice one, how the memories came flooding back. 30 years since I last did it in ernest, not too rusty. Cheers !

King Ratt
17th April 2008, 10:19
Hi Trotterdotpom...I must be getting rusty! Typed it straight off the replay into the message box..nice posting .. dont recognise any of the c/s though.

73 de KR

R651400
17th April 2008, 12:19
Doubt IBBA is Andrea Doria, more likely CC or one of the others... beautiful ships.
Only a couple of Italian H24 come to mind IBBA and IAAS or something near.
ELIR? One of the few Greek H24 new builds.
GOHN? No GZWB SN members?

hawkey01
17th April 2008, 12:54
Malcolm,

Like the GLD replica - Sounded pretty good. Probably slightly deeper but - good try.

GOHN - Edinburgh Castle.
KJEH - United States and her sister was WEDI - America.
ELIR is in there but cant get it maybe FairSky or similar.
IBBA there but cant retrieve it!.

Neville - Hawkey01

BA204259
17th April 2008, 13:02
There is certainly one member (not too active) that I know of who would have recognised GOHN. Hawkey01 rings a bell.... ELIR. ..are we a million miles off with Sitmar? Fairsea, Fairsky or Fairwind? For such a seafaring nation I can think of fewer Greek H24's than many others. I can think of lots of Italians, some beautiful Dutch liners and some American and German ones...but not Greek. I can even remember that rarest of countries to produce a liner...Stefan Batory/SPEE. Anyone crossing the North Atlantic in the '60's would remember her.

Edit: Ooops! Forgetting the French for a moment - that would never do..

trotterdotpom
17th April 2008, 14:22
Just curious, how do you know from that traffic list that the ships are H24 (24 hour radio watch for the uninitiated)?

ELIR may well be Fairsky or something (I recall ELAN, Fairstar, was forever on VIS traffic lists but by then she was P&O's "Funship").

SITMAR was an abbreviation of Societa Italiana Transporti Maritimi and therefore, not Greek - surprisingly.

John T.

BA204259
17th April 2008, 15:05
SITMAR was an abbreviation of Societa Italiana Transporti Maritimi and therefore, not Greek - surprisingly.

John T.

I knew that really, just checking if you were still awake down under.

Thanks for clearing that up for me though tdp. Have to say then, offhand I can't think of any Greek liners..(EEK) No doubt R651400 will enlighten me!:)

Roger Bentley
17th April 2008, 16:46
CC was ICCA

Roger Bentley
17th April 2008, 17:00
Fairsea HOLN Then another Fairsea with Sitmar was IBJF Fairsky HOQZ

R651400
17th April 2008, 17:52
TdotP H24 was to save typing...passenger ship. ELIR even though a passenger ship may have been same as 5LVC HX
BA204259 et al Olympia/ELIR, built on the Clyde 1953, as you say passenger new-builds not a Greek forte.

http://www.simplonpc.co.uk/GreekLinePCs.html#anchor69664

CGT ss France - FNRN ??

BA204259
17th April 2008, 18:03
CGT ss France - FNRN ??

"France" was FNRR. Another was "Liberté"/FNTT

hawkey01
17th April 2008, 19:00
A good few Greek pax ships.
Australis - Britianis - Ellenis - Patris - The Victoria - Queen Anna Maria. To name but a few.

I cannot remember all the c/s though.
Australis - HOOJ.
Patris - I think was SYPP OR SYYP.
Britanis - Possibly SXXE or was that Ellenis!
The Victoria - SXWE

Wish I had all my old c/s books.

6ZNV was I think Fairstar.

Hawkey01

K urgess
17th April 2008, 19:26
While on the Greeks was SVVV the Greek collective callsign?

R651400
17th April 2008, 19:38
While on the Greeks was SVVV the Greek collective callsign?

Affirmative....

Couple of popular Italian liners Italy-Oz in the '50s were Flotta Lauro's Roma and Sydney.

K urgess
17th April 2008, 19:41
Thanks R651400.(Thumb)
Been niggling for days. Can sleep again.

trotterdotpom
18th April 2008, 00:40
TdotP H24 was to save typing...passenger ship. ELIR even though a passenger ship may have been same as 5LVC HX
BA204259 et al ELIR, built on the Clyde 1953, as you say passenger new-builds not a Greek forte.

http://www.simplonpc.co.uk/GreekLinePCs.html#anchor69664

CGT ss France - FNRN ??

I knew what H24 meant, just wondered how everyone could tell from the traffic list that it was all passenger ships - just looked like any old traffic list to me.

John T.

R651400
18th April 2008, 06:02
I knew what H24 meant, just wondered how everyone could tell from the traffic list that it was all passenger ships - just looked like any old traffic list to me.
John T.

Posted H24 to give a clue to some of the ships on the spoof tfc list - must've been a fairly realistic simulation.

Roger Bentley
18th April 2008, 14:51
Done a bit more on Italian call signs, and Michelangelo was ICVI, Raffaello IBLO, Galileo Galilwi ICGN, Leonardo Da Vinci ICLN, and for Greeks Ellinis was SWXX, Queen Frederica actually registered as Vasilissa Frederiki SWIA. Homeric HPHY. Regards, Roger

Roger Bentley
18th April 2008, 15:33
My maroonwas BA64. that was 1955. signed by L Harris Ward. MIMC wages in 1951 was £5 per week. still got wages slip from 1st Bluie in 1952. 1 guinea a day. (£30.10 per month)

Hi John, My black was AC527 and my maroon AC580 dated 7 May 1952, I guess your black would have been an AC one as well, as we both sailed on our first trips around the same time i.e. 1950. AC for Atlantic City.
My ticket was then endorsed in January 1961 to comply with the Geneva convention 1959. I left the sea in Feb 1961 so it didn't really matter anymore! Regards, Roger (K)

hawkey01
19th April 2008, 14:33
Here are a few Greek Liners with callsigns.
Amerkanis/SXXE - X - Kenya Castle/GNCF.
Ellinis/SWXX - X - Lurline.
Queen Frederica/SWIA.
Patris/SVVY - X - Blomfontein Castle.
Britanis/SZWE - then HPEN - X - Monterey.
Romanza/HPEJ
The Victoria/3FEB2 - X - Victoria/5LQK. - X - Dunnotar Castle/GYVM. (GND situated near this castle)
Regina Magna/SXJG - X - Pasteur.
Australis/HOOJ - X - America/WEDI.
Queen Anna Maria/SYYX -X - Empress of Britain was still trading as Topaz but reported on April 13th sold for scrap to India. Previous names Empress of Britain - Queen Anna Maria - Carnivale - Fiesta Marina.

Hawkey01

R651400
19th April 2008, 17:21
Now there's a cracking GLD tfc list Neville, or maybe SVA.
Have you got an old copy of "Les Indicatifs d'Appels" tucked under your pillow?
Another US call I've got swirling around in empty space topside is WEMS or WIMS??

hawkey01
19th April 2008, 17:48
Malcolm,

No! but I know a man who does! One of my ex colleagues who used to keep all our ship name files etc up to date is my source. He still has all his old books and even now keeps up with the passenger ship side using various contacts. When I was trying to dig them out of my memory the other day it dawned on me who would know.

Neville

R651400
19th April 2008, 18:08
Thanks above Neville, ask him if he can come up with a WIMS or WEMS and if IBBA existed.
A 50/60s List of Call Signs slipped through the net a couple of years ago.
Twud be nice to sit and peruse from time to time, dreaming of the days when ships were ships.
Regds

hawkey01
20th April 2008, 12:07
Malcolm,

I certainly will.
I am sure IBBA is genuine but which one I cannot recall.

Neville

Roger Bentley
20th April 2008, 15:33
Malcolm and Neville, Re callsigns I have a 1955 copy of the list of ship and coast stations. Given to me by a soldier ex MN who liberated it in Port Said during the abortive 1956 campaign. He and his mates were on sentry duty in the old Lloyds signal station and he took a fancy to it. It is now part of the ROA archives but held by me for the time being. Lloyds Registers are also useful for call signs and I have 1950-51, 1962-63, 1974-75, and 1977 - 78. The last two liberated by me when an attache was throwing them out at one of my overseas postings. Glad to help if anyone has specific queries on call signs. Salaams, Roger

hawkey01
20th April 2008, 19:16
Malcolm
Firstly thank you Roger for your info.

I am sure that it will be most useful and called on in the future. My source has his own database and some LLoyds info but as he says the ships callsign book has gone missing. We used to have another source which was internationally used called Mackay's. I am wondering what happened to that when GKA closed. I will have to investigate.

Reference IBBA - she was the Italian passenger vessel ASIA which was converted to a livestock carrier in 1975. I do have a list of the other big Italian passenger ships of that era but will not list them all now.

Neville

K urgess
20th April 2008, 19:25
The only callsigns I've got are the ones I QSO'd when at sea and the ones published in the Marconi house magazine.
Plus all the ship stations around in 1913 but those are all 3 letter callsigns before the new postwar convention.
Usual story. I used to have a full set of publications but they got dumped as unwanted about 10 years after I gave up marine radio.
One day I'll make up a list of the ones I've got.

Roger Bentley
20th April 2008, 19:58
Malcolm
Firstly thank you Roger for your info.

I am sure that it will be most useful and called on in the future. My source has his own database and some LLoyds info but as he says the ships callsign book has gone missing. We used to have another source which was internationally used called Mackay's. I am wondering what happened to that when GKA closed. I will have to investigate.

Reference IBBA - she was the Italian passenger vessel ASIA which was converted to a livestock carrier in 1975. I do have a list of the other big Italian passenger ships of that era but will not list them all now.

Neville Thanks I will stand by! While checking on some of the other Italian ships I did find the Andrea Doria's call sign it was ICEH. Also came across a lot American collectives and particularly liked WOOL. Anyone like to guess where it was used? Cheers, Roger

R651400
21st April 2008, 06:51
Also came across a lot American collectives and particularly liked WOOL. Anyone like to guess where it was used?

Neville, Thanks for IBBA, haven't a clue how it popped out of the woodwork, Asia, LLoyd Triestino, running between Trieste to India and Far East.

Roger, WOOL? You say where it was used? Does that mean shipping company or something different like an historic occasion?

Regards

Roger Bentley
21st April 2008, 15:28
Hi, This was the general Call sign for all (presumably American ships) as per 1955 list in the Great Lakes. There is a large number of collective call signs beginning with the letter W some for areas and others for specific companies. e.g. WALC for all ships in the Alcoa SS Co. Regards, Roger

R651400
25th April 2008, 12:17
Further to my GLD effort somewhere in this thread, there may be some of you out there who would like to hear that old call sign rasp out of the PC again. If you pm me with call sign/TR or short QTC, including email address, I'll do my best to knock up a reasonably realistic WAV file copy to send via em.

ps Should have added if non broadband download may take some time and all email addresses will be treated confidentially and then binned.

Tai Pan
26th April 2008, 11:13
I have a tape recording of GLDs last transmission, but dont know how to put it here. My QTH is Cornwall so I was able to directly tape it.

R651400
26th April 2008, 13:09
I have a tape recording of GLDs last transmission, but dont know how to put it here. My QTH is Cornwall so I was able to directly tape it.
John, There's a QTC on the GLD posting 53. One ship still not recognised.
For tape/record to mp3/wav conversion I use an excellent program called "ripvinyl".

K urgess
26th April 2008, 15:34
I've got the whole of the 500kcs session up to GLD closing down on MP3.
I copied it from the QRT 500kcs DVD and play it when I want to make myself feel really miserable.
Unfortunately it's copyright so I can't post it or any section of it.
If you feel inclined to make yourself miserable and haven't got a copy already it's available from greatbritainonline.

Most sound card software will allow you to record "what your hear" so can be used to copy soundtrack etc.

King Ratt
26th April 2008, 15:52
I have a cassette tape of the UK Coast stations going QRT which I recorded directly off 500 on the evening of 31 Dec 1997. Begins with GPK, QSLd immediately by EJM and many others including IAR. This tape is probably far too long to turn into an MP3 unless any of you know otherwise but I can probably flash up an old cassette to cassette player and copy if anyone is interested.
I took some stick from quite a few fellow SCots when I left the pub that Hogmanay evening to go and listen to the various QRTs but it is certainly a nostalgic half hour or so.
73 de R thomson

K urgess
26th April 2008, 17:35
Doesn't need to be HiFi, KR.
The one I've got is 43 minutes long and 4.9Mb. Its recorded in mono at something like 16 Kbps.
Cheers
Kris

King Ratt
26th April 2008, 18:36
OK on that Kris, I must have a go at getting it onto the site. I live 42 miles from GPK as the crow flies and got a QSA5 from there. No problem with copyright issues being my own handywork. Watch this space.
73
Rab T

K urgess
26th April 2008, 18:48
Look forward to it, Rab T.
You may have to post it in chunks and fiddle with the bit rate a bit because of the site limit on MP3s.
Currently 1Mb if I read it right.
73 OM
Kris

NoMoss
24th July 2008, 21:57
I've got the whole of the 500kcs session up to GLD closing down on MP3.
I copied it from the QRT 500kcs DVD and play it when I want to make myself feel really miserable.
Unfortunately it's copyright so I can't post it or any section of it.
If you feel inclined to make yourself miserable and haven't got a copy already it's available from greatbritainonline.

Most sound card software will allow you to record "what your hear" so can be used to copy soundtrack etc.

Thanks to hearing about the QRT 500kcs DVD I obtained a copy and watched (and listened) it yesterday. Made me very sad but proud as well. Incidentally the morse key shown in close up at GLD is the same as the one I use as a book-end to keep books form falling off a shelf. Mine still has the original bakelite cover and is screwed to a heavy piec of brass. I got it from a PO engineer in exchange for some stamps when GNI was moving up to its new station.

King Ratt
25th July 2008, 11:45
Further to my posting of 26 Apr I still have not got around to putting my QRT of the UK coast stations onto a CD or into MP3 form-too much to do in other places eg gardening and the likes! Will get round to it eventually.

73

Rab T

mikeg
25th July 2008, 12:27
Further to my posting of 26 Apr I still have not got around to putting my QRT of the UK coast stations onto a CD or into MP3 form-too much to do in other places eg gardening and the likes! Will get round to it eventually.

73

Rab T

Ah, another 'round toit', I'm sure Kris has a special award for that (==D)
Here in the north of Scotland it's too hot for gardening would you believe!

K urgess
25th July 2008, 13:06
Coming up! [=P]

The sun is shining in Yorkshire for almost the first time in a month. No gardening without a hat!

charles henry
25th July 2008, 21:21
Have you still got the old skills can you copy this ? If it works there should be an attached file!

Very pleasant sending and it was amusing that you used some of the punctuations. Havent a clue as to how I could reply in morse but having been "hamming" since "47 would be inclined to QRQ and use some accented letters just to confuse the great unwashed!
regards chas(Pint)

tedc
3rd August 2008, 16:28
BA, Buenos Aires was 1950's and was on all PMG's after the convention date. I think C... Cairo was the one previous. What followed have no idea.

Yes, I have BA/116 on my 1st & BA/317 on my 2nd! (1955ish)

Radar was 1494 (i think that was the year I sat it!)

Rhodri Mawr
10th August 2008, 20:13
I seem to have found this thread a little late. However, I have some info to add to what has already been posted.

My PMG1 cert, dated 06.06.66, was numbered G/974 (issued under the terms of the Geneva Convention). What followed were M (Montreux), MT (Malaga-Torremolinos) and, I think, back to G for Geneva yet again. One certificate prefix which has not been mentioned was AC (Atlantic City) but I have no idea was year that was. Think it goes back to just before or just after the BA (Buenos Aires) years.

That takes us up to the 80's when the DTI (in the shape of the Radiocomms Agency) finally took over from the old Post Office (latterly BT) and issued all radio certs directly themselves. The use of prefixes was then discontinued - the modern GMDSS certs have only the serial number.

As far as identifying the callsigns of those old ships, check out this link which lists all the ships throughout the world which were enlisted to compile and send the OBS reports. The info goes back to 1955 and lists ships of all flags/nationalities.

http://icoads.noaa.gov/metadata/wmo47/cdmp_1955-72/

73s
RM

charles henry
11th August 2008, 21:29
Excuse my ignorance but is the Buenos Aires number your PMG/1 number?
Never did like the purple colour of those which is why I've still got a black one. Much nicer colour.[=P]
Mine's G/2303 issued in 1966.
My authority to operate was pasted over in 1976 because of the new article 23 of the Radio Regulations, Geneva, 1976.
I notice I had it endorsed for 6 months and 1 year but never bothered for 2 years serviced. Naughty boy, considering I was at sea for 11 years.
I certainly look deadly serious with my button down collar and definitely serious haircut.
Cheers
Kris

PURPLE COLOUR??? What happened to the red PMG1 were they afraid of the Russians taking over or did the Post Master General become a bit queer?
Mine is still red (Except for a few beer stains I got on it celebrating in the State Bar in Glasgow the night I received it). colour lasted better than I have
de chas(Pint)

K urgess
11th August 2008, 21:40
Well it was a sort of maroon colour if I remember right if not exactly purple then a cross between that and red.
Still prefer the black [=P]

SWXX
12th August 2013, 13:29
Hawkey01 thanks to your posts which came up on a search, I was able to fill in a few of the blanks in my memory... I was on board SS Ellinis SWXX in 1975 aged 11y11m and already had the most unusual hobby. As a small boy I used to listen to ship short MF and HF communications in CW. I knew all the frequencies, call signs, procedures, codes. So I immediately went to the radio room, and chirped "Sydney radio" on hearing vis5 coming from the speaker in morse. I was too short to reach to the window. The R/O Manolis looked out, then down at me in bewilderment. "What boy, what?!" and turned the dial. And this? XSG/4/7 in CW me: "Shanghai Radio". He ran out, grabbed me, plonked me on the chair after adding a cushion, and tuned in a weather report. "Write this down." I copied it perfectly, he whisked me right up to the Captain, just about to leave Melbourne. Spoke to him in Greek no doubt along the lines of "See this skinny little runt? It's a miracle. He not only knows Morse and all the ship shore procedures, he copied down this weather report without error!" The Captain turned to me and said in English as along the lines of "I Captain... the Law at Sea, hereby designate you as full time Radio Officer (without pay!?) rank of Apprentice. You start your 8 hour shift (tomorrow?). A female officer uniform was adjusted by the tailor and within hours I had a full uniform with R/O stripes and apprentice rank. Ate with the crew every day and did 8 hour shift for the next 5 weeks. Best time of my life.

You reminded me which CS belonged to which ship. I remembered of course in addition to SWXX, SZWE, SZRE, HOOJ, SVVY, and had forgotten about SXXE. Remaining mystery which one at Chandris was SZRE? There was an Olympis as I remember so perhaps that was it. Also I remember the 3 R/Os on that Voyage 52N (51N?54N?) their names, two Dimitris and one Manolis (the chief R/O who was the one on duty when I went to the radio room before setting sail and who took me to the Captain), and that they used to meet up for a sked on some freq in 17MHz band, using MAN, DS, and DIM as their "callsigns". Also I remember the unusual QSW of SWXX, 2 of them, 8343 and 12508. I think another was something like 17569 or so but only vaguely. Also forgot the unusual MF QSW something like 432. Lovely big old ship, born 1932. Sad it is no more, or its metal is dispersed wherever via its destruction in Taiwan?

Troppo
12th August 2013, 15:18
Hawkey01 thanks to your posts which came up on a search, I was able to fill in a few of the blanks in my memory... I was on board SS Ellinis SWXX in 1975 aged 11y11m and already had the most unusual hobby.

What a GREAT story!

(Applause)

Troppo
12th August 2013, 15:23
A most interesting thread!

Yes, I could copy the CW as well. Cheating, actually....it was perfectly sent with no QRM/N or QSB...

(*))

In Australia, our certificate (MRGC) numbers were state based. You got a letter for the state of issue and then a number. Mine was the one hundred and fifth issued in NSW, so I got N105.

For any of you contemplating amateur radio, your 1st or 2nd class or MRGC should get you a complete exemption for any amateur exams....well, it does down under, anyway.

Ian Beattie
13th August 2013, 17:16
Could be wrong but I seem to remember a figure of £48ish in 65 and it increased to about £54ish later that year with MIMco as a first tripper but it was put up in increments according to sea time, after 3 years sea time it went on seniority. Or is it just a figment of my very shakey imagination.
Cheers Ian

Ian Beattie
13th August 2013, 17:25
I certainly would need a typewriter or a bigger keyboard than is with this computer to go faster than 30 but long ago we had to do 40 plain text 30 code 25 numbers and 20 cyco - try listening in to the russian trawlers in the White Sea (no longer exist) but when we chatted we didn't write it down 'cos it was just like somebody talking to you and you would butt in or one would be on cw and the other on r/t and it was a two way coversation just the same as talking for other folks LOL
Cheers Ian

IAN M
13th August 2013, 23:00
I started with a Special Certificate, No. C/9954, in June, 1943 which was replaced by my 2nd Class PMG, No. C/8969, in February, 1946.

My 1st Class PMG, No.3689, is dated 2nd April, 1948. On 31st May, 1956, when I worked at Portishead Radio, a notice, relating to the BA Convention of 1952, was stuck on the inside of the back cover, and G.655 is shown is very small black letters.

Regarding holders of 1st and 2nd Class PMGs being excused the Amateur Radio tests. I know this was the case in the UK for some years after the Second World War, but was certainly not the case in 1963 when I applied. I had to sit a written paper and to pass the 10 wpm Morse test and, of course, had to pay for the privilege.

As for Morse test put on SN by Gareth, I passed that one and thank him for his ingenuity. Well done.

Regards to all

Ian

Troppo
14th August 2013, 10:11
It was certainly the case in Australia and is still the case (just checked).

You were screwed over Ian if they made you sit a piddling 10 WPM amateur morse test and a basic amateur theory exam, mate.......

King Ratt
14th August 2013, 12:42
There was no problem in the Falklands in 1983. Just show your PMG plus ten pounds and that was it. However they got my first allocated c/s wrong and had to change it to VP8ARR.

James Clarke
14th August 2013, 14:38
It was certainly the case in Australia and is still the case (just checked).

You were screwed over Ian if they made you sit a piddling 10 WPM amateur morse test and a basic amateur theory exam, mate.......

I can confirm that Ian is right - here in UK. In 1985 after many years of wishing I was on-air (had been ashore since late 1973) I signed-up to the RAE course at Bangor University (one of the Technicians there ran it in the evenings for some pocket money) and of course I passed the written exam. However, despite having my RAE Cert I just couldn't work up to applying for and doing the 10wpm morse test (more money to be paid) since I felt very aggrieved at the insult that this implied. The written exam was one thing - since it was important to know the Amateur regs and procedures - and I needed something outside of my work to distract me in the evenings.

Sadly, I never did get my Amateur licence - I (being Irish and having an address in Ireland) had hoped to get one of those unusual Ireland Call-Signs but based in Wales and therefore with an add-on to match. I understand they were rare and attracted a lot of attention on-air by those wanting to have a QSL to match.

Sometimes the "Law is an Ass" and that certainly applied to the above situation - complete bonkers.

James

IAN M
15th August 2013, 20:31
Can't finger ELIR, my guess is that it is another of your Liberian registered Greeks. GOHN rings a faint bell but, as you mention H24 can only hazard a wild guess at P&O-Orient. Ditto GMRS. Doubt IBBA is Andrea Doria, more likely CC or one of the others... beautiful ships. Plus the fact that AD sank in July '56.

GMRS was Alfred Holt's Achilles.

Ian