What type of wood?

KShips
12th April 2008, 15:57
Hello,

I am planning to build a RC model of the 'Loch Ranza'. (3 feet 5 inches long)
Picture - www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=107341

Can anyone help me what type of wood can I use to make it watertight, please?

Thank you,
KShips

Jim MacIntyre
12th April 2008, 17:52
KShips
I don't think the type of wood matters too much. Whatever you are comfortable working with. You should plan to fiberglass the hull - that will provide the watertight integrity and give it added stregth.
Also in a model that size you should have plenty buoyancy so the weight will not be a concern.
Good luck - look forward to some piccies in due course.
Jim Mac

john webster
12th April 2008, 18:40
How are you planning to build her, bread and butter , or plank on frame ?

Shipbuilder
12th April 2008, 19:46
Don't think it matters what wood you use, model probably wont be in water all that long anyway. Over a year ago, I put a small plank on frame model of something I had lost interest in, in the water butt, loaded with several small steel bars. It is still floating, but needs pumping occasionally. It was built with frames cut from standard three ply. The planks were obeche stuck on with a combination of superglue & contact adhesive & sprayed with red primer followed by black gloss.

Problem (as far as I am concerned) with using firbreglass, resins etc, is the lung-busting fumes they give out!

Bob

KShips
14th April 2008, 12:29
Hello,

Thank you for giving me advice all of you.

I know nothing about model shipbuilding for I never built one. John Webster, please, can you explain to me what "bread and butter" and "plank on frame" mean?

Thank you,

KShips

JimC
14th April 2008, 17:15
Hello,

I am planning to build a RC model of the 'Loch Ranza'. (3 feet 5 inches long)
Picture - www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=107341

Can anyone help me what type of wood can I use to make it watertight, please?

Thank you,
KShips
Agree with the'almost any type of wood bit but I would think that larch or just plain old white pine will do -both are soft, easily worked. Make sure you make the seams tight. Both woods readily expand when wet but both dry-out equally as well. They can be made watertight by immersing the finished hull in water then stirring -in plenty of very fine, dry sawdust. The sawdust finds its way into the tiniest fissures and expands with the water. Only one problem with fibre glass - if water gets between the glass/wood sandwich it'll set-up rot eventually. Another way is to double skin the hull with a layer of fine canvas in between. Whatever you use - make sure you seal the wood best as you can to exclude any freash water residue. Salt water does not create the same problems. Best of luck.

Jim C.

PJG1412
14th April 2008, 19:21
My first build was wood (soft and hard) and fibre glass (West System laminated cloth) easy to use and no smell. Hope that helps.
PJ

nhp651
14th April 2008, 21:01
I don't mean to be in any way derogatory in what I say next but you might think of the similarity of the two, Kships,but your boat Loch Ranza has a shape akin to a "skip".From what I remember from her when she served at Largs she was square, slab sided and basically flat bottomed.
Tjhis model lends herself beautifully to working in plane birch faced ply of say 6mm thicness for the basic hull, which would make it a strong structure, and use a thinner ply( of similar birch face or modellers marine ply for the inner structure and then plasticard for the superstructure.
However, as you are un aware of such basic knowledge as "bread and butter" and plank on frame construction, you really should go down to your local club, and also pick up the two model boat monthly mags which give good sound advice.
In fact one of the mags covered a build of one of the cal mac ferries not long ago.hope this helps a little.neil.

Jim MacIntyre
14th April 2008, 23:10
KShips
This could develop into a very long thread......
1) Do you have plans for the model ? Plans drawn for model building will usually come with some information on how to build. Yard plans do not.
2) If you look at PJ's thumbnail above - that is plank on frame.. the keel/stem/stern are cut and frames are notched onto it along the length.
Planks are then glued on to form the hull.
3) Bread and butter consists of horizontal layers cut to shape and then glued together just like slices of 'bread and butter'. Then sanded to the final shape.

I think Neil has given you the best advice so far - if you have a local hobby shop in the area browse their books, there are a variety of publications on building hulls etc. If you know of a model boat club nearby that is definitely worth a visit.

Also there are plenty of photos in the model ship photo archive of SN where you can see a variety of photos on the hull construction - Miniman (Barry) and Carlos Mariano have both recently documented construction of their models but I think they were both beyond the hull when they started.

As you can see there are plenty of modellers here ready and willing to help and many of them are experts, but I think you would be best off doing some basic reading before 'launching' the project.

Jim Mac

john webster
15th April 2008, 11:55
hi, kships, bread and butter is where the construction takes the form of layers of wood cut out to the shapes of the lines as looked at from above, the layers are generally about 1/2 inch in thickness and laid one on top of the other , and have a space cut out in the center,and glued together, ie wood is the bread and glue the butter, the shatp edges are then cut planed sanded smooth , and the center cut away. hope you understand what I am trying to say.

KShips
15th April 2008, 20:03
Hello all,

Wow! Very useful information. Thanks for your help.

I am no expert and do not expect something state of art from someone who is fifteen but I'll do my best.

By the way, in Malta there is only 1 club that formed some 4 years ago with only tens of members. But, all the same thanks for the advice.

Thanks,
KShips

KShips
15th April 2008, 20:27
Hi,

So, what is the best method from 'plank on frame' and 'bread and butter'?

KShips

Jim MacIntyre
16th April 2008, 03:14
KShip
There is no real 'best' in this case. Each modeller is likely to have a preference for one or the other. My own choice is plank on frame, I think you get more usable space inside the hull for motors and radio etc.
As to more information in Malta check the web-site listed below:

http://www.a-m-e.org/new/ameweb/default.htm

According to their application form they have areas of interest in 'Marine' and in 'Electric RC Marine'.
You have picked a fairly ambitious project and the investment in joining an association like the one listed might save you in the long run from making expensive mistakes.
All the best
Jim Mac

nhp651
16th April 2008, 09:26
kships,
if you look up and join the forum of www.modelboats.co.uk you will find a wealth of help from that site, and also if you post a question about the Calmac ferries, of which Loch Ranza is part of the fleet you will probably find someone with plans for her and may even be some one who has built her who will be able to offer advice and tips on building.(Thumb)
neil.

KShips
16th April 2008, 11:05
Hi,

Jim, I did not know about that association. I knew about another one. So there are 2 in Malta. Thanks.

Neil, I don't think that 'Loch Ranza' is a ferry. It was built in 1944 as Empire Swordsman. Maybe you thought of another ship whose name is 'Loch Ranza' too. But don't worry, thanks for your effort to help me. (The 'Loch Ranza' that I want to build can be found when you click on the link the first thing on this thread.)

Thank you,
KShips

nhp651
16th April 2008, 18:31
sorry kships.
the Loch Ranza that I know and love so well is a Caledonian McBraine scottish ferry, and therefore totally different to the ship that you wish to model.
therefore, forgive me putting you on false tracks with my other posts and as discribed I would also go for a plank on frame model. Easier to get a good shape, less heavy to manhandle and less costly to build.
Again. forgive my ignorance in your choice of ship.
neil.

KShips
16th April 2008, 19:33
Hello neil

Don't worry, just a small mistake. I saw your effort to help me. Don't worry.

KShips